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Altering gut bacteria pathways may stimulate fat tissue to prevent obesity
(Cleveland Clinic) Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered a biological link between gut bacteria metabolism and obesity. The team showed that blocking a specific intestinal microbial pathway can prevent obesity and insulin resistance, as well as cause fat tissue to become more metabolically active. The study was recently published in Cell Reports. The research team, led by J. Mark Brown, Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute, studied the metabolic pathway that creates trimethylamine oxide, a chemical produced by gut bacteria during digestion of key nutrients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood Levels of Meat-Linked Chemical Tied to Odds of Heart Trouble
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 -- A molecule produced in the digestion of red meat, eggs and dairy products is linked to an increased risk of a fatal heart attack or stroke, researchers say. Patients with high blood levels of trimethylamine N-oxide... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 11, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

How to make fish less fishy (video)
(American Chemical Society) Freshly caught fish is delicious. But with every passing day, the nice filet in your fridge smells a little fishier, thanks to a stinky molecule known as trimethylamine. Is there any hope? This week, Reactions helps make fish taste and smell less fishy with chemistry. Learn about the amino acids that give fresh fish its sweet and savory flavor, and get three chemistry-backed tricks to cut down the fishy taste and smell. Check it out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJugFcBWNY4. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trimethylamine N-oxide and Prognosis in Acute Heart FailureTrimethylamine N-oxide and Prognosis in Acute Heart Failure
Might plasma levels of the gut-derived metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide have utility as a prognostic marker in acute heart failure? Heart (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Gut bacteria byproduct linked to chronic kidney disease for the first time
For the first time, researchers have linked trimethylamine N-oxide -- a gut metabolite formed during the digestion of egg-, red meat- or dairy-derived nutrients choline and carnitine -- to chronic kidney disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Intestinal Trimethylamine-N-Oxide in Heart FailureIntestinal Trimethylamine-N-Oxide in Heart Failure
Links between gut microbiota metabolism, TMAO formation, and cardiorenal pathophysiology are explored. Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 1, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Cassie Graves battles rare metabolic disorder that causes her to smell of FISH
Cassie Graves, 22, from South London suffers from Trimethylaminuria - a rare metabolic disorder where the body can’t break down trimethylamine - found in certain foods. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Choline/Betaine Prognostics Depend on Trimethylamine-N-OxideCholine/Betaine Prognostics Depend on Trimethylamine-N-Oxide
Find out why these biomarkers for coronary heart disease should always go with their gut. . . European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Trimethylaminuria (TMAU) - Fishy Body Odor Causes and Treatment
When an individual tends to give off a strong fishy smelling body odor it can caused by a compound called trimethylamine or TMAU. TMAU is a rare metabolic disorder also known as fish odor syndrome or fish malodor syndrome. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - March 25, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Health and Disability Source Type: news

Eggs, Also, May Raise Heart Risk Via Gut Bacteria
Yet another study, by the same US research team, links raised risk of heart attack and stroke to the action of gut bacteria on certain compounds contained in digested food. This time the link is to a compound found in eggs: lecithin. Earlier this month, researchers reported in Nature Medicine how they found L-carnitine, a compound found in red meat and added to energy drinks, can increase heart risk because gut bacteria digest it to produce trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite already suspected of helping to clog up arteries... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

New Link Discovered Between Heart Disease And Red Meat
A compound abundant in red meat and added as a supplement to popular energy drinks has been found to promote atherosclerosis - or the hardening or clogging of the arteries - according to Cleveland Clinic research published online this week in the journal Nature Medicine. The study shows that bacteria living in the human digestive tract metabolize the compound carnitine, turning it into trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite the researchers previously linked in a 2011 study to the promotion of atherosclerosis in humans... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

'Red meat chemical' link to heart disease
Conclusion Links To The Headlines Red meat nutrient used in weight-loss and muscle-building supplements could cause heart disease. Mail Online, April 7 2013 Red meat chemical 'damages heart', say US scientists. BBC News, April 8 2013 Eating a lot of red meat can cause heart disease. Daily Express, April 8 2013 Links To Science Koeth RA, Wang Z, Levison BS, et al. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of l-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis. Nature Medicine. Published online April 7 2013 (Source: NHS News Feed)
Source: NHS News Feed - April 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Source Type: news

Compound In Red Meat, Energy Drinks, Raises Heart Risk Via Gut Bacteria
Researchers in the US have discovered a surprising new connection between red meat and heart risk that involves bacteria living in the gut. Gut bacteria digest L-carnitine, a compound abundant in red meat and added to popular energy drinks, to produce trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a metabolite already suspected of helping to clog up arteries. Previous studies that have tied red meat consumption to increased cardiovascular risk have shown while some of the raised risk is due to the fat and cholesterol in red meat, these culprits aren't enough to explain all of it... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news