What to use instead of NICE Evidence Search - a first thought
I have been promoting NICE Evidence Search much more systematically this year to " my " first year undergraduates in their first library session.  It is also on the resource lists I ' ve made for each of their courses.  I like the idea that there is one source, where all the results have been evaluated by health information professionals, and I ' ve suggested it ' s a good first place to search for any health topic.  But NICE Evidence Search is closing at the end of March 2022.  So what to use instead?NICE Evidence Search has two lists of sources, one of sites where some of the content is...
Source: Browsing - February 9, 2022 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: NICE Evidence Search Source Type: blogs

Neurostimulation of Tongue Relieves Tinnitus Symptoms
Tinnitus, the sensation of ringing in the ears, is one of the most common medical conditions. Approximately 15% of the population suffers from it, but the nature of this malady makes it difficult to study and find therapeutic options. Now, a multinational collaboration of researchers has shown that a neurostimulation system made by Neuromod Devices Limited, an Irish company, can significantly reduce the symptoms of tinnitus. The technology is based on a finding that stimulating the trigeminal nerve, which scientists believe is related to the auditory system, seems to have an effect on tinnitus. Coupling this effect wit...
Source: Medgadget - October 8, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: ENT Neurology Source Type: blogs

Adverse effects of hydroxychloroquine
In case you were ever stupid enough to follow Trump’s lead you would have already injected ultraviolets in your eyeballs by now to save you from Covid and maybe bathed in Domestos or sulfuric acid or both! Anyway, his latest bullshine claim is that he’s been taking the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine to keep Covid at bay. Well, for starters there is no evidence that this drug acts as a prophylactic against infection with SARS CoV-2 or indeed any pathogen other than the causative agent of otherwise drug-resistant malaria. It’s primary use is in treating lupus. There was some testing done weeks ago to...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Health and Medicine Source Type: blogs

Chemotherapy and hearing loss: Monitoring is essential
Treatment for cancer is a difficult time for patients and their families. While there are significant benefits of chemotherapy in treating and managing many types of cancers, some of the negative side effects may not always be so obvious. One of the potential negative effects of chemotherapy that you may not be aware of is hearing loss. Hearing loss caused by chemotherapy is generally considered a type of sudden hearing loss, so monitoring hearing before and after treatment with hearing tests is important. How are chemotherapy and hearing loss connected? Hearing loss as a potential side effect of chemotherapy is more likel...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Naples, MD Tags: Cancer Ear, nose, and throat Hearing Loss Source Type: blogs

Masks Pose Barriers for People With Hearing Loss: Here ’s a Novel Solution
Federal health officials are on the brink of recommending face coverings to help stem the spread of COVID-19, according to recent news reports. But masks and other face coverings muffle the wearers’ voices and prevent people from reading their lips, writes University of Florida graduate student Laken Brookes in a CNN article. For people who are hard of hearing, that’s a problem, she says. Brookes, who has tinnitus, connected with a number of people with and without hearing challenges about communication problems related to masks. She notes that the fallback method—using a whiteboard passed back and forth—isn’...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 3, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Carol Polovoy Tags: Audiology Health Care Slider audiologist COVID-19 face masks Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and Audiology: Closed Practices, Empty Campuses, Halted Research
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the country, most everyone has had to adapt in some way to accommodate this strange new normal—audiologists and hearing researchers included. With calls and procedures for self-quarantine and guidance for small businesses and universities varying from state to state, hearing care professionals may find themselves thrust into new situations. Some are being asked to adopt telepractice for the foreseeable future, and others are quickly switching to virtual-only learning for their audiology students. ASHA is constantly monitoring the situation as it evolves daily. For more informa...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 31, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jillian Kornak Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care News Private Practice Slider audiologist COVID-19 Telepractice Source Type: blogs

Acoustic neuroma: A slow-growing tumor that requires specialized care
An acoustic neuroma, also known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a tumor of the hearing and balance nerve complex in the brain. They are rare, and account for less than 10% of all brain tumors. The tumor involves an area of the brain and ear called the lateral skull base; an acoustic neuroma can range in size, and it can cause a variety of troublesome symptoms related to hearing and balance. It is important to note that although the diagnosis of a brain tumor can cause significant anxiety, acoustic neuromas are noncancerous and grow very slowly. This means that immediate treatment is rarely necessary. What are the most commo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Naples, MD Tags: Brain and cognitive health Ear, nose, and throat Hearing Loss Radiation Source Type: blogs

When should I be concerned about ringing in my ears?
What is tinnitus? Tinnitus is a generic term used to describe a ringing or noise in the ears that occurs in the absence of external sound. This is a very common condition that is thought to occur in up to 15% of people. It can occur in one or both ears, and often people will describe the sound as “coming from their head.” There are a variety of descriptions that people use for their tinnitus such as whooshing, ringing, pulsing, and/or buzzing, and the quality of the sound varies by individual. Symptoms of tinnitus can cause great distress While tinnitus can be caused by conditions that require medical attention, it is ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Naples, MD Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Hearing Loss Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

TBI Leaders Respond to Comments Dismissive of Traumatic Brain Injury
Reporters recently asked President Trump about news that U.S. troops had sustained various degrees of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in an Iranian missile strike. He responded, “I heard they had headaches and a couple of other things, but I would say, and I can report, it’s not very serious.” An outcry followed these remarks, with military leaders and others noting that TBI has been called a “signature injury” among U.S. troops in the recent conflicts in the Middle East. Fifty U.S. troops are reported to have TBI resulting from the Iranian strike.  Research has tied mild TBI (mTBI, the predominant form) to...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - January 29, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Bridget Murray Law Tags: Audiology Slider Speech-Language Pathology blast injuries Cognitive Rehabilitation cognitive-communication disorder hearing loss TBI tinnitus Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Discovers How To Start an Irish Medtech Company
Ireland has long been a hub for technology. Many of the large, well-known tech corporations have offices in Dublin, and 18 of the 25 largest medtech companies in the world have offices and headquarters in Ireland. But besides being known as a major hub (and tax shelter) for many multinational companies, Ireland is also an attractive location for medtech startups. Last month, Medgadget was invited to Ireland to experience the story of many of its successful startups, from the early idea generation and incubation phase to the handshakes that help bring the technology into the Irish marketplace, the European Union, and the re...
Source: Medgadget - November 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Neuromodulation for Tinnitus Relief: Interview with Neuromod Devices CEO Dr. Ross O ’Neill
Our nervous system plays a central role in how we sense things in our environment, and modulating the signals that pass through our nerves can manipulate our brain in various ways. Neuromodulation is commonly used for pain relief and is being researched to help restore movement, sight, hearing, and cognitive function for those who are impaired. It was this amazing technology that excited Dr. Ross O’Neill, founder and CEO of Dublin, Ireland based Neuromod Devices. Neuromod Devices has developed “Lenire,” a non-invasive therapy for patients with tinnitus, a debilitating symptom of several hearing-related dis...
Source: Medgadget - October 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: ENT Exclusive Neurology Source Type: blogs

Why We Went To Capitol Hill, and Why We ’ll Go Back
As members of the Coordinating Committee for ASHA Special Interest Group 7, Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation, we—Deb Culbertson, Beth Humphrey, Jani Johnson, Nicole Marrone, and Jessica Sullivan—recently spent a day on Capitol Hill. As a group, we visited our various representatives to advocate for the professions—with guidance from ASHA’s legislative team—the day before our annual business meeting at the National Office. After our visit, we debriefed about the experiences so other audiologists and speech-language pathologists considering advocating for our professions on the Hill might gain some insi...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 10, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Deb Culbertson Tags: Academia & Research Advocacy Audiology Health Care Private Practice Slider Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss hearing protection Source Type: blogs

I Can’t Hear You!
​A 50-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of ringing in his ears and difficulty understanding what people were saying. He was concerned that he was having a stroke. A full neurological exam was unremarkable aside from decreased hearing, but his hearing deficits appeared to be equal bilaterally. Otoscopic exam demonstrated a normal tympanic membrane, and the rest of his physical exam was unremarkable. The patient's past medical history was significant for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, for which he took lisinopril and atorvastatin. He was recently treated with a 10-day course of doxycycl...
Source: The Tox Cave - April 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Spotlight on Special Interest Group 8, Audiology and Public Health
Looking for a group that explores the relationship between audiological services and public health issues? Let Amy Boudin-George explain why this SIG is for you. When did you join your SIG—and what made you want to join? I joined after I began working in the Department of Defense (DoD), where hearing loss and prevention are seen as being in the public health domain, in addition to being a medical issue. SIG 8 hits that exact mark and goes beyond, showing how hearing loss and tinnitus are public health issues on a global scale. How has your involvement with the SIG helped you in your career? ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 15, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Amy Boudin-George Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care Private Practice Slider audiologist educational audiologist Hearing Aids Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss hearing protection public health Source Type: blogs

Implant Simultaneously Reads and Stimulates Brain to Control Parkinson ’s, Other Diseases
Electrical stimulation may serve to treat a variety of brain-related conditions, and there are already a number of products that help to control Parkinson’s, essential tremor, addiction, and depression. Though there’s a considerable ongoing progress, most of the currently available technologies are not very smart and certainly can’t measure brain activity and respond to it simultaneously. Researchers at University of California, Berkeley, have developed a wireless electrode array implant that can read and contemporaneously stimulate the brain. The technology, being commercialized by Cortera Neurotechnol...
Source: Medgadget - January 2, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Neurology Neurosurgery Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs