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Developmental Language Disorder: The most common childhood condition you've never heard of
Professor Courtenay Norbury debunks some myths about children with this common but poorly understood conditionDevelopmental Language Disorder (DLD) is diagnosed when children fail to acquire their own language for no obvious reason. This results in children who have difficulty understanding what people say to them, and struggle to articulate their ideas and feelings. Recentresearch has shown that, on average, 2 children in every class of 30 will experience DLD severe enough to hinder academic progress.In aprevious post for Head Quarters about DLD, some of the reader comments reflected commonly held misconceptions about chi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Psychology Science Education Parents and parenting Source Type: news

What Can Parents Do To Promote Literacy?
Discussion Positive parenting has been shown to improve the overall health and well-being of children. Positive parenting includes: Respecting the individuality of the child and the adult in the relationship – accept the child for their strengths and weaknesses, encourage children to take risks, encourage their confidence in themselves Respecting that the individuals are part of a family and community – help children understand that they cannot have everything their way, that other people and the world they live in must be considered too. Even in a resource poor environment, data shows that positive parenting ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Language disorder and retrospectively reported sexual abuse of girls: severity and disclosure - Brownlie EB, Graham E, Bao L, Koyama E, Beitchman JH.
BACKGROUND: Despite emerging evidence for an association between communication disorders and maltreatment, little research has examined sexual abuse characteristics or disclosure experiences among individuals with language disorder (LD). Given that communi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Penn State study shows aphasia may not solely be a language disorder
(Penn State) Aphasia, a language disorder commonly diagnosed in stroke patients, may not be solely a language issue as traditionally believed, according to a Penn State study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Language disorders in victims of domestic violence in children's homes - Cobos-Cali M, Ladera V, Perea MV, Garc ía R.
Studies that deal with child maltreatment have become relevant during these past years. One important aspect to consider is the impact of maltreatment on the cognitive functioning and more precisely on language. Our objective is to analyze the different co... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Factors associated with speech-language disorders in motorcycle accident victims - Silva MG, Silva VL, Vilela MR, Gomes AO, Falc ão IV, Cabral AK, Lima ML.
PURPOSE: To investigate factors associated with speech-language disorders in victims of motorcycle accidents. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study. Victims of motorcycle accidents studied were treated at Hospital da Restaura METHODS: ção betw... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 26, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Making Sense of Sensory Processing Disorder
Our bodies are wired for sensory input. Touch, (which includes temperature, texture and pressure), taste, sound, sight and smell are the ways in which we explore the world, from the moment we enter it. When all systems are functioning, we experience a feedback loop. For example, if you were shivering from the cold and wanted to feel warmth, you might put on a cozy sweater or wrap a fleece blanket around your shoulders. Your body would likely respond by relaxing, followed by an emotional relief and perhaps even a sigh. The next time you felt chilly, you would remember what it took to remedy that sensation and follow th...
Source: Psych Central - November 22, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Edie Weinstein, MSW, LSW Tags: Attention Deficit Disorder Autism / Asperger's Caregivers Children and Teens Genetics Parenting Asperger Syndrome Pervasive Developmental Disorder Sensory integration dysfunction Sensory Processing Disorder Source Type: news

Equip teachers to support children with language disorders in the classroom
It is estimated that two children in every class of 30 suffers from language disorders but their difficulties are often mistaken for bad behaviour.Language is a fantastically important human achievement. It is one of the main tools we have to form social bonds and to share our ideas, emotions and experiences. It is also the foundation of learning, problem solving and literacy development and an important predictor of academic success.Typically, language is easily learned through our everyday interactions with the world - people talk to us and we learn to talk back. There is little direct instruction or conscious thought ab...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Courtenay Norbury and Emma Broddle Tags: Science Psychology Education Source Type: news

Automated screening for childhood communication disorders
For children with speech and language disorders, early-childhood intervention can make a great difference in their later academic and social success. But many such children -- one study estimates 60 percent -- go undiagnosed until kindergarten or even later. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Genetics Home Reference: FOXP2-related speech and language disorder
https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/foxp2-related-speech-and-language-disorder (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - September 13, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Sign language may be helpful for children with rare speech disorder
Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Speech therapy for children with dysarthia acquired before three years of age
Children with motor impairments often have the motor speech disorder dysarthria, a condition which effects the tone, strength and co-ordination of any or all of the muscles used for speech. Resulting speech difficulties can range from mild, with slightly slurred articulation and breathy voice, to profound, with an inability to produce any recognisable words. Children with dysarthria are often prescribed communication aids to supplement their natural forms of communication. However, there is variation in practice regarding the provision of therapy focusing on voice and speech production. Descriptive studies have suggested t...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Texas mom wakes up from surgery with a British accent
Rare speech disorder leaves a Houston-area mother of three sounding like she belongs on "Downton Abbey" (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stuttering mouse experiment sheds light on common human speech disorder
Genetic mutation given to squeaky rodents found halting patterns in early life squeaks, investigating causes of the human stammerThe closest thing to a stuttering mouse has been created by scientists who gave rodents a genetic mutation that causes the speech disorder in humans.Mouse pups recorded in the first week of life squeaked with more pauses and displayed more repetitive, halting patterns in the noises they produced when they carried the mutation. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Language Science Biology Source Type: news

Mice with genetic defect for human stuttering offer new insight into speech disorder
Mice that vocalize in a repetitive, halting pattern similar to human stuttering may provide insight into a condition that has perplexed scientists for centuries, according to a new study. These mice, which carry a mutation in a gene associated with stuttering in humans, may help scientists understand the biological basis of the disorder, and potentially lead to treatments. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Making the case for active learning
By Dawn Hackman, M.S., AHIP, Research & Education Librarian University of North Dakota Library of the Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND On January 8, 2016 the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) hosted a workshop called “The Librarian and Active Learning Models,” which is available via the Medical Library Association’s Educational Clearinghouse. I worked with the SMHS’s Associate Dean for Teaching & Learning to identify a workshop on active learning that would be relevant to both librarians and faculty. We noticed that this workshop focused on three a...
Source: The Cornflower - March 14, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: admin Tags: Funding General News from the Region Training Source Type: news

Apraxia Speech Disorder Can Progress to Neurodegenerative Disease
It may start with a simple word you can not pronounce, your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - February 15, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Neurological Disorders Source Type: news

Speech disorder called apraxia can progress to neurodegenerative disease
It may start with a simple word you can't pronounce. Your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out. Misspeaking might draw a chuckle from family and friends. But, then, it keeps happening. Progressively, more and more speech is lost. Some patients eventually become mute from primary progressive apraxia of speech, a disorder related to degenerative neurologic disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Speech Disorder Called Apraxia can Progress to Neurodegenerative Disease
ROCHESTER, Minn. – It may start with a simple word you can’t pronounce. Your tongue and lips stumble, and gibberish comes out. Misspeaking might draw a chuckle from family and friends. But, then, it keeps happening. Progressively, more and more speech is lost. Some patients eventually become mute from primary progressive apraxia of speech, a [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - February 15, 2016 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Increase in the Number of Children Who Receive Federal Disability Benefits for Speech and Language Disorders Similar to Trends in the General Population
The increase in the number of children from low-income families who are receiving federal disability benefits for speech and language disorders over the past decade parallels the rise in the prevalence of these disorders among all U.S. children, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report's findings underscore the long-term and profound impact of severe speech and language disorders on children, as well as the degree to which children with such disorders can be expected to be a "significant presence" in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. Read More (S...
Source: News from the National Academies - January 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

How music, language shape the brain
A researcher has pioneered a way to measure how the brain makes sense of sound, suggesting that the brain's ability to process sound is influenced by everything from playing music and learning a new language to aging, language disorders and hearing loss. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Eczema associated with childhood speech disorder
Pediatric eczema was significantly associated with a higher risk of speech disorder, reported Dr. Mark A. Strom and his coauthors from Northwestern University, Chicago. A retrospective analysis of 354,416 children in 19 U.S. population–based cohorts found that the prevalence of speech disorder was... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - November 10, 2015 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Finches offer researchers a new tool with which to study Huntington's disease
The most common lab animals, rats and mice, can't tell scientists much about speech disorders. However, a new study shows how songbirds, specifically zebra finches, may be able to aid research on neurodegenerative disorders that affect speech and vocalization. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Finches offer researchers a new tool to study Huntington’s disease
The most common lab animals, rats and mice, can’t tell scientists much about speech disorders. However, a new study shows how songbirds, specifically zebra finches, may be able to aid research on neurodegenerative disorders that affect speech and vocalization. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - October 5, 2015 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Science News Fernando Nottebohm Huntington's disease Laboratory of Animal Behavior neurodegeneration neurosciences and behavior Wan-chun Liu Source Type: news

New Technology Could Restore Paralysis Patients' Power Of Speech
Individuals suffering from speech disorders or severe muscular weakness soon may have a way to communicate with doctors and loved ones just by breathing their words. A new augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device uses an algorithm that learns speech patterns from a patient’s breath, and researchers say the technology could prove particularly useful in intensive care units by establishing early diagnosis of locked-in syndrome. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - September 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

Autism and rare childhood speech disorder often coincide
Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to researchers. It's estimated that one in 68 children in the United States has autism and one to two in 1,000 have apraxia. With increased recognition and improved evaluation measures, more children are being identified with autism and apraxia. Developmental experts have long noted autism and apraxia seem to frequently coincide. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Autism and rare childhood speech disorder often coincide
(Penn State) Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tasha David says NOT vaccinating her kids was the best decision
Tasha David, an Australian mother of eight from Bungalow in New South Wales, has six vaccinated children who suffer with autism, ADHD, language disorder, and severe mood swings. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Relationships between language disorders and socio-emotional competence - Baixauli-Fortea I, Rosello-Miranda B, Colomer-Diago C.
INTRODUCTION. The rate of comorbidity between language disorders and behavioural, emotional and social problems is high. AIM. To review the literature on the social and emotional difficulties of children with specific language impairment from a development... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The Neurophysiology of Stuttering
Stuttering - a speech disorder in which sounds, syllables or words are repeated or prolonged - affects more than 70 million people worldwide. That's 1 percent of the global population. Four times as many men as women are afflicted with the disorder and, while the condition is not life-threatening, it is debilitating as it interferes with effective communication and erodes self-esteem and confidence. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - February 24, 2015 Category: Disability Tags: Cognitive Source Type: news

Little Kids Learn The Same Way Pigeons Do
We often point to language as evidence of our species' superiority. But the way humans learn language may not be so foreign to other animals, after all. A new study has found that the lowly pigeon may provide insight into how young children acquire language. Researchers at the University of Iowa found that pigeons are able to categorize and name dozens of objects, which means they engage in a type of associative learning that children also use to learn new words. "Our main thesis is that associative learning may underlie the acquisition of complex behaviors, including human language," lead researcher Dr. Ed Wa...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 9, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Speech and Language Disorders: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, we learn about speech and language disorders from Dr. Keith Josephs. To listen, click the link below. Speech and Language Disorders (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 5, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Language evolution: Quicker on the uptake
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Defects in the gene FOXP2 result in a severe speech disorder. As LMU researchers now show, when the functional version of the human gene is introduced into mice, it facilitates learning, and alters neuronal circuits in the brain which may have played a role in the evolution of language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 18, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Clinical assessment of motor speech disorders in adults with concussion - Cannito MP.
This article reviews the occurrence of motor speech disorders of dysarthria and apraxia of speech following closed head injury and other traumatic brain injuries in adults as they apply to sport concussion and related trauma. Athletic sideline and speech-l... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - August 16, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Gene that fosters synapse formation in the brain has Implications for language development, autism, epilepsy
Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice. The finding, they say, adds to scientific understanding of how language develops, as well as the way synapses - the connections among brain cells that enable us to think - are formed. A description of their experiments appears in Science Express. A group led by Richard Huganir, Ph.D., director of the Solomon H... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Autism Source Type: news

Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice. The finding, they say, adds to scientific understanding of how language develops, as well as the way synapses -- the connections among brain cells that enable us to think -- are formed. A description of their experiments appears in Science Express on Oct. 31. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 31, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Occupational Hazard for Teachers?
Researchers link speech and language disorders with the profession Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Occupational Health, Speech and Communication Disorders (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Progressive speech and language disorders an increased risk for teachers
Mayo Clinic researchers have found a surprising occupational hazard for teachers: progressive speech and language disorders. The research, recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias, found that people with speech and language disorders are about 3.5 times more likely to be teachers than patients with Alzheimer's dementia. Speech and language disorders are typically characterized by people losing their ability to communicate - they can't find words to use in sentences, or they'll speak around a word... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Study: Teachers More Likely to Have Progressive Speech and Language Disorders
Mayo Clinic researchers have found a surprising occupational hazard for teachers: progressive speech and language disorders News Minnesota Research News and Discovery's Edge (Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News - October 15, 2013 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Study: Teachers More Likely to Have Progressive Speech and Language Disorders
Mayo Clinic researchers have found a surprising occupational hazard for teachers: progressive speech and language disorders News Minnesota Research News and Discovery's Edge (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 15, 2013 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Study: Teachers More Likely to Have Progressive Speech and Language Disorders
Mayo Clinic researchers have found a surprising occupational hazard for teachers: progressive speech and language disorders News Minnesota Research News and Discovery's Edge (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - October 15, 2013 Category: Research Authors: Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic study: Teachers more likely to have progressive speech and language disorders
(Mayo Clinic) Mayo Clinic researchers have found a surprising occupational hazard for teachers: progressive speech and language disorders. The research, recently published in the American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias, found that people with speech and language disorders are about 3.5 times more likely to be teachers than patients with Alzheimer's dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 15, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The experts' guide to ageing
Experts on the ageing process explain why having good friends, lifting weights and learning languages can lead to a longer lifeJERRALD RECTOR, 26: Lift weights for better immunityBy the time we reach 80, most of us will be infected with a type of herpes virus which erodes the immune system and takes years off your life without you even knowing it. PhD student Jerrald Rector, at the University of Birmingham, knows he has the bug, and is working on ways to keep it from doing harm.What is this virus?Cytomegalovirus – CMV – is a kind of herpes virus that is symptom-free and harmless until your immune syst...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 7, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Catherine de Lange Tags: Culture Health and fitness Death and dying & wellbeing Features Life and style Ageing The Observer Science Source Type: news

Singing mice may give clues for human speech disorders
Researchers are in the process of studying singing mice to gain insight into their unique behavior, in the hopes of identifying genes that cause speech disorders in humans. The research team from the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas in Austin are analyzing the genes of the singing mice (scotinomys teguina), which hail from forests in the mountains of Costa Rica. They produce a string of high-pitched chirps of up to 20 squeaks per second, which sounds similar to a birdsong, in order to communicate with other mice... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Must-read: Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis
4.5 out of 5 stars Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis: an etiology worth considering in the differential of delirium. Punja M et al. Clin Toxicol 2013 Aug 20 [Epub ahead of print] Abstract This important paper is a must-read, especially for toxicologists who have not heard of this under-appreciated neurological disorder. (I was not aware of it until several days ago, when I found out that a friend of a relative had received the diagnosis.) Anti-NMDA encephalitis was first described in 2005. Advanced cases often develop altered mental status, autonomic instability, increased muscle tone, ...
Source: The Poison Review - August 28, 2013 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Best of TPR Medical anti-n-methyl-d-aspartate receptor anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis autoimmune neurologic Source Type: news

SimuCase avatars advance speech-language pathology training
(Case Western Reserve University) A new commercial venture, using technology developed at Case Western Reserve University's College of Arts and Sciences and Case School of Engineering, has made available avatars -- virtual patients -- to train speech-language pathologists. SimuCase allows graduate students and others training to evaluate speech-language disorders to practice using an interactive, Web-based program, reducing stress on the trainee, because a diagnosis doesn't have to be made on a real person. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Childhood apraxia of speech
— Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment for this childhood motor speech disorder. (Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - May 9, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

$12 million for a center for research on aphasia
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University has received a $12 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a center devoted to research on aphasia, a devastating language disorder that essentially robs the brain of language. The Center for the Neurobiology of Language Recovery will bring together the field's best researchers to find biomarkers that can predict language recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Uncovering The Secrets Of Human Speech Has Implications For Developing Computer-Brain Interfaces
A team of researchers at UC San Francisco has uncovered the neurological basis of speech motor control, the complex coordinated activity of tiny brain regions that controls our lips, jaw, tongue and larynx as we speak. Described in the journal Nature, the work has potential implications for developing computer-brain interfaces for artificial speech communication and for the treatment of speech disorders. It also sheds light on an ability that is unique to humans among living creatures but poorly understood... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news