Author J.K. Rowling Donates $18.8 Million to Research Into the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis
(LONDON) — Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has made a substantial donation for research into the treatment of multiple sclerosis at a center named after her late mother. The 15.3 million-pound ($18.8 million) donation announced Thursday will be used for new facilities at a research center based at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. The author’s mother suffered from the disease and died at the age of 45. The new gift follows a major donation Rowling made in 2010 that started the Anne Rowling clinic at the university. Rowling said she is encouraged by advances being made and proud that the clinic is not on...
Source: TIME: Health - September 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news

Incidence of diagnosed type 2 diabetes declining since 2006
'Sensibly optimistic systematic review does not provide definitive evidence that true incidence is falling ’ Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Even athletes can ’t outrun the effects of a bad diet (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 13, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Billy Connolly health: ‘My life is slipping away’ comedian on his chronic condition
BILLY CONNOLLY has been making people laugh for decades. His affable persona makes his health condition all the more poignant. In a recent documentary, the Scottish comedian reflected about his progressive condition. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Life-changing' cystic fibrosis drug deal for Scotland is welcomed
Campaigners are calling for patients in other parts of the UK to be allowed to access the treatment. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Best Way to Save Nature? More Nature
Avocets, terns and gulls swoop down onto Wallasea Island on England’s eastern coast, searching for food between blades of grass ruffled by the summer sea breeze. Aside from the wind, and the odd chirp or squawk, it’s quiet—the kind of peaceful scene that seems like it’s been going on for centuries. Yet five years ago, these wetlands didn’t exist. The mud the birds have landed on once lay under the streets of central London. In 2015, as part of a railway project, a construction crew scooped more than 3 million metric tons of dirt out from beneath the capital, drove it 50 miles east and piled it...
Source: TIME: Science - September 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: By Ciara Nugent / Wallasea Island, U.K. Tags: Uncategorized Climate 2019 climate change europe Source Type: news

Nearly two-thirds of Scottish doctors hit with large tax bills
Lead doctors warns of critical need for pension reform Related items fromOnMedica Health secretary ‘committed’ to contract negotiations Ageing medical workforce - a growing trend Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing Sharp increase in vacant consultant posts in Scotland GPs warn government: fund service properly or it will collapse (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Trusts must tackle staff burnout, says BMJ editor
Call for trusts to appoint wellness officers Related items fromOnMedica Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing Sharp increase in vacant consultant posts in Scotland NHS pension rules get an overhaul GPs welcome 'biggest reform to services in 15 years' Health Secretary sets out plans for NHS workforce (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A typology of street robbery and gang organization: insights from qualitative research in Scotland - Harding S, Deuchar R, Densley J, McLean R.
Utilizing interviews with 42 current and ex-street offenders, this study explores the relationship between street gang organization and robbery. Robbery type is affected by level of organization exhibited by the gang. For recreational and territorial young... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Putting the 'street' in gang: place and space in the organization of Scotland's drug-selling gangs - McLean R, Deuchar R, Harding S, Densley J.
Street gangs, by definition, enjoy a special relationship with the street. Prior research shows that some communities are synonymous with gangs and that turf holds a combination of expressive and instrumental value for gang members. As gangs evolve over ti... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The men most at risk from suicide in Scotland
The unemployed and those in traditionally male-dominated jobs face the biggest suicide risk, figures show. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New blood test trialled on 12,000 Scots catches lung cancer early
Thousands of Scots at risk of lung cancer took part in a trial, described as "globally significant". (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-Sensitivity Troponin Implementation: HiSTORIC in Practice High-Sensitivity Troponin Implementation: HiSTORIC in Practice
Lessons from the High-STEACS trial helped Scottish investigators devise the best strategy for implementing the very high-sensitivity troponin tests for chest pain triage, explains Prof Mills at ESC 2019.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Assault-related sharp force injury among adults in Scotland 2001-2013: incidence, socio-demographic determinants and relationship to violence reduction measures - Goodall CA, MacFie F, Conway DI, McMahon AD.
This study aimed to determine the incidence of these injuries over time and to explore their key socio-demographic determinants. Methods ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Nursing vacancies in Scotland reach record level
Latest figures from NHS Scotland show that the shortfall now tops 4000 Related items fromOnMedica How the new nursing associate role will break new ground RCGP calls for longer patient consultations Staffing has improved since Francis, claims Hunt Rethink study funds for nurses to bolster headcount, government urged NHS Learning Disability nurse numbers plummet (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 9, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Toughen up ban of ‘glamour’ knife sales, urges violence reduction tzar
Despite recent legislation, zombie knives, with cutting blades of up to 25 inches, are still available Related items fromOnMedica RCGP sets out priorities for general practice for new prime minister Scotland sets out its Public Health priorities Extra annual £3.2bn needed to reverse impact of cuts to public health grant Promise to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030 Workforce shortages and Brexit threaten long-term NHS Plan goals (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 9, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Boost strength and balance, says new exercise guidance
UK chief medical officers issue new physical activity guidelines across the life course Related items fromOnMedica Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Under-fives must play more and spend less time sitting with screens GPs failing to follow women at risk after gestational diabetes Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Flu jabs to be offered to all children (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 9, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Responding to the health needs of trafficked people: a qualitative study of professionals in England and Scotland - Williamson V, Borschmann R, Zimmerman C, Howard LM, Stanley N, Oram S.
Trafficked people require timely and ongoing access to healthcare services. Yet, many encounter difficulties accessing and utilising healthcare services, both while in situations of exploitation and after their escape. This research investigated barriers t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Scientist: DNA Samples Suggest Famed ‘Loch Ness Monster’ Might Be a Giant Eel. Or Maybe There’s Just Lots of Regular-Sized Eel in the Loch?
(NEW YORK) — A scientist who has collected DNA from Scotland’s Loch Ness suggests the lake’s fabled monster might be a giant eel. Neil Gemmell, from the University of Otago in New Zealand, says the project found a surprisingly high amount of eel DNA in the water. He cautioned, though, that it’s not clear whether that indicates a gigantic eel or just a lot of little ones. But he said at a news conference in Scotland on Thursday that the idea of a giant eel is at least plausible. ANDY BUCHANAN—AFP/Getty ImagesUniversity of Otago geneticist Neil Gemmell poses with a beaker of water on the shores...
Source: TIME: Science - September 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Malcolm Ritter / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Scotland Source Type: news

If We Want to Address the Crisis of Veteran Suicide, We Must Acknowledge Its History
In 2018, 33-year-old American Marine veteran Justin Miller died by suicide in the parking lot of the very organization he had turned to for help. After four days in the Minneapolis Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospital, Miller had been released and immediately took his own life. Between October 2017 and November 2018, 18 additional suicides were recorded on VA campuses around the country. As recently as Aug. 7, 2019, another veteran took his own life in a VA parking lot. These types of deaths are not limited to the United States. In December of 2018, a public mass vigil in Britain remembered 70 Scottish veterans who...
Source: TIME: Health - September 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Harold Walker Tags: Uncategorized health Military Opinion Source Type: news

Loch Ness monster could be a giant eel, say scientists
Otago University researchers confirm the loch contains no monster – or dinosaur – DNAThe Loch Ness monster could be a giant eel, according to a fishy new theory that will keep Highland tourists guessing.Inone of the biggest DNA studies of its kind, a team of scientists from New Zealand ’s Otago University found the presence of about 3,000 species in the deep murky waters of the Scottish loch.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Weaver Tags: Science Scotland Environment UK news Source Type: news

DNA findings suggest the Loch Ness monster might be a giant eel
A scientist who collected DNA from Scotland's Loch Ness suggests the lake's fabled monster might be a giant eel. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 6, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scottish Lake's DNA Suggests Loch Ness'Monster' Might Be Giant Eel
Researchers found a surprisingly high amount of eel DNA in the waters of Loch Ness, but it's not clear whether that indicates a gigantic eel or just a lot of little ones. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 5, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Taxing sugary foods would cut prevalence of obesity
20% price increase would have double the effect of a similar price rise in sugary beverages Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 WHO dietary fat guidance fails to consider crucial evidence Child type 2 diabetes is a ‘wake-up call’ to the nation (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 5, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

One year of Safe Surgeries!
What an incredible twelve months! One year after the launch of Safe Surgeries, over 220 GP practices across 28 cities and towns have joined the network. There are Safe Surgeries in 53 Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) around the UK, stretching from Devon to Scotland, all taking a stand for inclusive and welcoming healthcare for everyone in their communities. The initiative has been shortlisted for this year’s General Practice Awards for a Clinical Improvement Award in Public Health and Prevention, a fantastic recognition of the work of our members and their vital contribution to public health and community wellbei...
Source: Doctors of the World News - September 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Targets Latest Gene Therapy
Pioneering pulmonologists Dr. Steven Albelda and Dr. Daniel Sterman have worked for more than 20 years on developing gene therapy to effectively combat pleural mesothelioma cancer. The payoff may have finally arrived. Albelda and Sterman’s long-awaited, phase III clinical trial will open this month to evaluate the efficacy of TR002, a novel gene therapy drug, when used in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine. TR002, a form of immunotherapy, is a genetically engineered adenovirus that triggers the anti-tumor effects of interferon, a naturally occurring protein that destroys cancer cells. “The hope is, if i...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 4, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Push for roll-out of NHS passporting and e-rostering
Schemes aim to improve staffing and cut admin Related items fromOnMedica Doctors believe patient care has worsened Safer staffing should be enshrined in law, says RCN Brexit creates uncertainty for EU care workers in Scotland Ageing medical workforce - a growing trend Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Violence against doctors on the rise globally
Angry mob kills doctor, in Assam, India Related items fromOnMedica Can medicine be cured? NHS strain would worsen in the face of a harsh Brexit GPs demand defence of Northern Ireland health service from Brexit Stop using EEA doctors as political pawns in Brexit talks Time to root out bullying in NHS Scotland (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Hundreds face 'unbearable pain' at end of life
Every week 11 terminally-ill people in Scotland suffer in pain as they die, campaigners say. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

School uniform supplier must show it doesn ’t profit from sweatshop labour
One of the UK’s largest school uniform manufacturers has today (Monday) been challenged by unions to show its clothing isn’t being made using sweatshop labour. Trutex, which has been supplying school uniforms in the UK for more than 150 years, has so far refused to release information about the factories it uses, according to labour rights campaigning organisation Labour Behind the Label. Companies including Marks & Spencer, Primark, New Look and ASOS now all regularly provide supply chain information about the factories producing their clothing, following public outrage about brands exploiting workers. The...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 2, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release Source Type: news

'Smoking kills' warnings printed on INDIVIDUAL cigarettes 'would discourage people from smoking'
Scientists at the University of Stirling in Scotland tested the controversial concept on 120 smokers and asked for their thoughts. Volunteers told how they found it was off-putting. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plant-based diets risk worsening brain health nutrient deficiency
UK is failing to recommend or monitor dietary levels of choline, nutritionist warns Related items fromOnMedica Healthy lifestyles may offset dementia risk, study finds Weight loss targets exceeded on NHS type 2 diabetes prevention programme Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Exercise tackles ‘genetic’ obesity Tackling obesity ‘must be made a national priority’ (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 30, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Scottish GPs to get 2.5% pay award
Pay award backdated to April Related items fromOnMedica Johnson promises to tackle pensions crisis GP numbers working in the NHS are falling NHS brain drain is down to punitive pension tax changes Johnson warned to invest in the NHS Helping GPs to help people live the life they want through a more personalised care approach (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 29, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Girl is the 'only person in the world' to suffer from a disorder that has left her unable to eat
Nyara Bone, of Ayr, Scotland, has a set of DNA deletions and duplications on her thirteenth chromosome. The disorder has left the three-year-old with 24 health complications. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly half of Scottish grant for hard-up families spent on Pregnancy and Baby payment
Between December 2018 and June 2019, this accounted for £6.1 million of the £12.9 million spent so far Related items fromOnMedica UK lagging behind peers on child health Fewer than ever women smoke at point of birth Eight in ten stillbirths might have been avoided Maternity care to become more ‘personalised’ Deprived women 60% less likely to have any antenatal care (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 28, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Cancer patients to get personalised support
£18m funding for cancer support workers Related items fromOnMedica Better cancer treatment remains a ‘major’ public ‘priority’ Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking Is the NHS ready for ‘Cutting edge’ CAR T cell immunotherapy? Scotland launches its ‘Detect Cancer Early’ campaign Cancer patients using complementary meds die sooner (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 27, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Oceans of Noise: Episode Three – Science Weekly
During our summer break, we ’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson concludes this three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollutionFirst released: 03/05/2019As wildlife recordist Chris Watson looks for solutions to ocean noise pollution, he hears fromTim Gordon, whose long-awaited trip to the Great Barrier Reef became a devastating experience when he heard the eerie silence of a dying coral reef, caused in part by global warming.But despite the pessimistic tone evident in many environ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Chris Watson, produced by David Waters with sound engineering by Pascal Wyse and Shanida Scotland , and executive production by Katherine Godfrey. Commissioned by Tracy McVeigh Tags: Oceans Environment Science Source Type: news

Consider financial incentives to boost NHS headcount, government urged
Vacancy fill rate far too slow to meet demand and provide high quality care, say healthcare leaders Related items fromOnMedica NHS ‘workforce gap’ is harming the quality of care Scotland ’s CMO calls for more ‘realistic medicine’ Bed cut plans ‘undesirable and unachievable', warns think tank Spike in excess deaths linked to NHS and local authority spending cuts ‘Make or break year’ for NHS trusts forecasting £2.3bn deficit (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 23, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Government announces remit of hospital food review
Hancock pledged to overhaul provision following the listeria deaths linked to pre-packed hospital sandwiches earlier this summer Related items fromOnMedica Every government promises to solve the social care crisis. Maybe this one means it Maternity care better in some respects – but still many problems Scotland reveals plans to cut impact of type 2 diabetes Social prescribing workers to ease GP pressure Prisoners have right to health care as good as community care (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 23, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The UK Government must help end Scotland's drug-related death crisis - Nicholls J, Cramer S, Ryder S, Gold D, Priyadarshi S, Millar S, Hunter C, Hogg R, Jones A, Measham F, Stevens A, Hamilton I, McPhee I, Eastwood N, Powell M.
Jo Kimber and colleagues1 are right to call for the government to announce a public health crisis in response to a record number of drug-related poisonings in the UK. Recognising and responding to public health emergencies is a core responsibility of go... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

RPS in Scotland speaks to BBC Radio Scotland about medicines shortages and Brexit
RPS spokesperson and Deputy Director for Scotland, Aileen Bryson, has been interviewed by BBC Radio Scotland about the effect of a no-deal Brexit on access to medicines. Aileen outlined the RPS posit (Source: Royal Pharmaceutical Society News)
Source: Royal Pharmaceutical Society News - August 22, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Council services ravaged by decades of funding cuts, say MPs
£5 billion funding gap for local authorities, and growing; social care on verge of collapse Related items fromOnMedica Every government promises to solve the social care crisis. Maybe this one means it Prioritise and fund prevention to save lives and NHS, warn doctors Mind reveals huge variation in STPs ’ mental health spend Nearly 10,000 beds lost from half of England ’s local authorities Scotland ’s persistent health inequalities ‘unjust but not inevitable’ (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 21, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Doctors tell parents too late that their child is near death, survey suggests
National guidelines needed on giving parents bad news, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Cancer mortality cut by a third in young people Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Swine flu jab in pregnancy safe for children as well as mothers CCGs ’ duties for children with disabilities Doctors must give parents explicit advice on spotting sepsis (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 21, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Oral antibiotic use linked to heightened bowel cancer risk
But lower rectal cancer risk, suggesting differences in microbiome activity along the length of the bowel, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Cetuximab with chemo shrinks more secondaries Statins might not cut colorectal cancer risk after all Invest in workforce to roll out bowel cancer screening, urges former health secretary Bowel cancer screening tests exceed target set in Scotland FOB associated with rise in all-cause mortality (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 21, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Scottish practices sent almost 400 incorrect discharge letters
Practices in Scotland were sent almost 400 incorrect discharge letters - wrongly stating that patients had conditions such as cancer or endometriosis - due to a computer glitch.  The glitch was caused by a software update to the national patient information system, Trakcare, by NHS Forth Valley health board.  The health board stated the discharge letters had a coding error, which meant there was an issue within the section of the letter that lists hundreds of pre-existing health conditions. Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - August 20, 2019 Category: Practice Management Authors: costanzapearce Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Latest News Source Type: news

Oceans of Noise: Episode Two – Science Weekly podcast
During our summer break, we ’re revisiting the archives. Today, Wildlife recordist Chris Watson presents the second instalment of a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollutionFirst released: 03/05/2019Contrary to popular belief, and the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life under the ocean surface is not a silent world but a dense and rich sonic environment where sound plays a fundamental role to all known life.The pioneering natural history sound recordistChris Watson and the sound artistJana Winderen meet a ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Chris Watson, produced by David Waters with sound engineering by Pascal Wyse and executive production by Katherine Godfrey and Shanida Scotland. Commissioned by Tracy McVeigh Tags: Oceans Environment Science Source Type: news

Schools should be sugar-free to boost oral health
Experts seek ban on sugar in all schools Related items fromOnMedica Poorest Scottish kids do the least exercise UK children have already eaten 18 years ’ worth of sugar by 10th birthday Obesity levels in Year six children rise again Less risk of obesity in children of healthy mothers GPs should lead on weight management advice to children (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

NHS Patient Safety Technology Provider Patientrack Becomes Alcidion
A technology company that has helped NHS hospitals in England and Scotland to quickly identify and respond to their sickest patients, will now be known as Alcidion. Patientrack, which is known for providing technology for electronic patient observations and early warnings of patient deterioration to the NHS, first announced it had been acquired by Alcidion Group Limited in 2018. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - August 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

Rates of underage drinking have plummeted across the world over the last decade
The number of underage drinkers across England, Scotland and Wales shrunk by 40 per cent between 2010 and 2014. No data was analysed for Northern Ireland. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cystic fibrosis drugs that have the potential to save lives are rejected for use in Scotland
The Scottish Medicines Consortium have rejected Orkambi and Symkevi after hearing 'powerful testimonies'. Both drugs cost about £100,000 per year per patient that is eligible. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news