Government response to ACMD report'Ageing cohort of drug users '
Department of Health and Social Care -This document sets out the government ’s response to the recommendations made in the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) reportAgeing cohort of drug users. The Department of Health and Social Care sought contributions from the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish administrations and coordinated responses to the report. Officials from each of the four nations have reviewed the council ’s advice and set out work underway to address the recommendations.ReportLetterDepartment of Health - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

15 Years of Blogging
Today (Oct 1) is my blog’s 15th birthday. I wrote my first post on Oct 1, 2004, starting with WordPress 1.0.Tomorrow (Oct 2) is the 10-year anniversary of our first 3-day workshop (the original Conscious Growth Workshop in Las Vegas). That’s also the day my wife Rachelle and I first met. Since then we’ve done 16 3-day workshops on a variety of different themes.I’ve really enjoyed this past decade. I’m especially glad I leaned into taking more trips, which comprise some of my fondest memories during this time period. Before 2009 I’d never traveled outside the USA. Now I do so pretty regul...
Source: Steve Pavlina's Personal Development Blog - October 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

Before Brexit: Were Cameron ’ s EU concessions full of holes
Swiss researchers have looked at the pre-Brexit settlement negotiated by then UK Prime Minister David Cameron with the European Union and suggest that this was very much a missed opportunity for all parties that might have avoided the need for a referendum on the UK leaving the EU and all that ongoing problems to which that has led, despite the referendum being technically only advisory. The voting turnout for the referendum in June 2016 was not particularly high and the result was almost equally split with a very narrow margin for the leavers rather than the remainers. Nobody was more shocked by the result than many of th...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - September 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Back in Black
Dr Chris Nickson Back in Black After checking the patient’s observations and refitting his oxygen mask, the nurse heard the patient ask: “Are my testicles black?” The nurse raised his eyebrows, then spoke in his Scottish brogue, “I’ll check if you like”. The nurse lifted up the bed sheets, poked around for a bit, then declared,”no, they’re not black”, as he […] (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 1, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Chris Nickson Tags: Medical Humour test results testicles Source Type: blogs

Referral forms - barrier to timely patient care
James Booth reacts as a referral form is cited as a contributory factor in a patient death Related items fromOnMedica Northern Ireland GP patients encourage self-care NHS Scotland pressures ‘need urgent action now’ Online triage ‘not a solution’ to GP workload pressures BMA calls for maximum number of patients per GP GP patient care quality sliding into ‘state of emergency’ (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - August 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

How Meditation Didn ’t Nearly Save My Life
My first introduction to meditation was shortly after I moved to the US in 2006. I was attending a two-day workshop and one of the speakers claimed that he’d have committed suicide if he’d not been introduced to meditation. That made me sit up and take notice. Not that I’d been contemplating suicide, but my sleep had been hit and miss since I was in my late teens and I did have a tendency to get stressed a tad too easily. As soon as I got home I jumped onto Amazon to peruse the ironically, overwhelming selection of cd’s from meditation teachers. One of the people who seemed to be popular and have gr...
Source: A Daring Adventure - August 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tim Brownson Tags: Life Coaching Source Type: blogs

Tackling loneliness
House of Commons Library - The government's Loneliness Strategy was published in October 2018. It set out a wide variety of cross-departmental measures that the government would take to provide'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. This briefing: explains the Strategy; the steps taken so far by the government; looks at research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions; and briefly outlines the situation in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The briefing is accompanied by a reading list.BriefingMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - August 5, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Review Body on Doctors ’ and Dentists’ Remuneration: forty-seventh report 2019
This report sets out the DDRB ’s analysis of evidence given by relevant organisations and makes recommendations for doctors’ and dentists’ pay and associated issues in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.ReportMore detail  (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 23, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 17th July 2019
Some recent things...Global healthExploring the equity impact of a maternal and newborn health intervention: a qualitative study of participatory women ’s groups in rural South Asia and AfricaBaby ‐Friendly Community Initiative—From National Guidelines to Implementation: A Multisectoral Platform for Improving Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices and Integrated Health ServicesA study in KenyaExpanding the Agenda for Addressing Mistreatment in Maternity Care: A Mapping Review and Gender AnalysisAuditNational Maternity and Perinatal Audit Organisational Report 2019 (HQIP)Second report from this audit. &...
Source: Browsing - July 17, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Communication issues
Why being able to talk to colleagues is just as vital as talking to our patients Related items fromOnMedica Treatment of whistleblowers a “stain on NHS”, say MPs Can medicine be cured? GPs welcome 'biggest reform to services in 15 years' Primary Care Home has positive impact on care and services NHS Scotland pressures ‘need urgent action now’ (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - July 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Lock up your boxes – there are invaders
The Box-tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis, Walker, 1859) is an invasive species that has reached the British Isles. It originated in Asia and its larvae feed on, as the name would suggest, various species of Buxus, box tree (known as boxwood in the US). It turned up in my scientific trap night of 11th July 2019. I almost missed logging it as it flew up to a window as I was opening the trap. I’ve sent a record to the Cambridgeshire County Record. Box-tree Moth (Cydalima perspectalis) It’s a pretty pearlescent moth and was first seen in Europe in 2006, in Germany, specifically. It is most likely to have hitched a ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Moths Source Type: blogs

A hint of flint
The Lepidoptera, the scaly-winged insects we know as moths and butterflies, have become some of a citizen science preoccupation for me over the last year or so, hopefully at least a few of you noticed. I’ve talked about how many of these insects are perhaps dowdy and drab but there is such huge variety in their form, shape, patterns, and behaviour and so many are brighter and more colourful and intriguing than the moths we call butterflies in English. With more than 2500 species in the British Isles, what’s an amateur naturalist going to do, but study, photograph, and write about them? Yesterday one of my coll...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - June 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Moths Source Type: blogs

Psychology Has Been Greatly Enriched By Concepts From Non-English Languages (And Why It Should Engage Cross-Culturally Even More)  
“My project proposes that the field can engage with non-English ideas and practices in a much more inclusive and systematic way” By guest blogger Tim Lomas The novelist David Foster Wallace famously told a story of two young fish swimming in the sea, whereby an older fish glides by and asks, “how’s the water?”, to which they look at each other in puzzlement and say, “What’s water?” The central point of the parable is that we are constantly immersed in contexts to which we give little thought or consideration, but which nevertheless influence us profoundly. Among the most...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: guest blogger Language Source Type: blogs

Fear of a Gold Planet
Proposed nominees Stephen Moore and Herman Cain having dropped out of contention, discussion continues over the Trump administration ’s possible next nomination to the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors. The views of the latest candidate under consideration by the administration, Judy Shelton, have revived a question that commentators raised earlier about Moore and Cain: Should favoring some kind of gold standard disqualify a nominee from occupying one of seven seats on the Board? Here let me disclose that I worked with Judy Shelton on the Atlas Economic Research Foundation’s Sound Money Project. But th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 4, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

Natural Law, Gay Rights, and the State Department ’s New Commission on Unalienable Rights
More on the State Department ’s new Commission on Unalienable Rights, about whichI wrote in this space on Friday. Aimed at providing Secretary Pompeo “with fresh thinking about human rights discourse where such discourse has departed from our nation’s founding principles of natural law and natural rights,” the commission has raised several concerns. Chief among them is whether “natural law” is code, signaling that the department in futu re might “focus less on protecting women and LGBT people,” as put byPolitico, which broke the story on Thursday afternoon.  Giving weigh...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Roger Pilon Source Type: blogs

Waiting for Care: is Scotland meeting its commitment to older people
This report highlights more than 4 in 10 older people with ‘critical’ or ‘substantial’ needs wait more than six weeks for social care in Scotland. It outlines six recommendations to local and national government which could help improve the position, including; more regular data recording so councils can spot trends and better respond and plan for i ncreased demand; further efforts to attract and recruit more social care workers; and ensuring that the resources required to fund social care in the future are met.ReportPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 28, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Social care Source Type: blogs

Progress delivering the Emergency Services Network
This report finds that delayed ESN is likely to be even later than expected and the gove rnment’s already increased forecast costs are highly uncertain. It recommends that the Home Office test its overall programme plan to determine whether the new schedule for launching ESN and shutting down Airwave is achievable.ReportPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 13, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS finances and productivity Source Type: blogs

Allan Burns
Dr Mike Cadogan Allan Burns Allan Burns (1781 - 1813) was a Scottish anatomist and surgeon. Remembered for his monograph on heart disease, resuscitation options in cardiac arrest and Burns ligament (1802) (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 12, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponym Allan Burns Burns ligament cardiac arrest Resuscitation space of Burns syncope anginosa Source Type: blogs

JavaScript for Cheminformatics, Part 2
ConclusionsIts first release written in a matter of days by a then-obscure company, JavaScript may be the most unlikely success story in all of software. Having emerged from a dark period lasting until the mid-2000s, today's JavaScript is a full-featured programming language wrapped in a rich, mass-deployed environment. Chemistry has been extremely slow to follow the direction charted by the rest of the software industry, but glimpses into the future are everywhere. (Source: Depth-First)
Source: Depth-First - May 1, 2019 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Moth of the Month – Maiden ’ s Blush
Maiden’s Blush moth, Cyclophora punctaria The Maiden’s Blush moth, Cyclophora punctaria, Spring form is not as well marked as the Summer form where the blush is more obvious, but you can still see it here. This species is a geometer moth, which means its larvae (caterpillars) move in such a manner that they seem to measure the earth, they’re known as inchworms in the USA and elsewhere. Specifically, this member of the Geometridae is a member of the sub-family Sterrhinae, which includes the “Least Carpet” and several “Wave” moths as well as the “Blood-veins”. The species...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Moths Source Type: blogs

The rise of food allergies
Gerry Morrow reviews the evidence-based approach to diagnosis Related items fromOnMedica NHS type 2 Diabetes Prevention Programme exceeds expectations Campaigners call for 18 age limit on energy drinks Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Weight loss targets exceeded on NHS type 2 diabetes prevention programme Low fat vs low carb diet success not linked to genetics (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - April 15, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Mapping the Vikings using R
The commute to my workplace is 90 minutes each way. Podcasts are my friend. I’m a long-time listener of In Our Time and enjoyed the recent episode about The Danelaw. Melvyn and I hail from the same part of the world, and I learned as a child that many of the local place names there were derived from Old Norse or Danish. Notably: places ending in -by denote a farmstead, settlement or village; those ending in -thwaite mean a clearing or meadow. So how local are those names? Time for some quick and dirty maps using R. First, we’ll need a dataset of British place names. There are quite a few of these online, but t...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - April 3, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: R statistics ggplot2 history maps podcast rstats viking Source Type: blogs

Our Visit to WIRED Health 2019 at London ’s Francis Crick Institute
WIRED Health, now in its sixth year, returned to London’s Francis Crick Institute. The event was opened by Crick Institute director Paul Nurse who introduced the institute and its mission to understand the fundamental biology of human health and disease. The team at the Crick, consisting of 1500 researchers and three Nobel Prize winners, make up Europe’s largest biomedical research facility with an already impressive slate of research, despite being only two years old. The theme of WIRED Heath and the venue’s vision was perfectly summarized by Sir Paul, who closed his address with the charge “f...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tom Peach Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

Stand to lose?
Phil Hammond ponders whether it is worth entering the political game Related items fromOnMedica Government publishes vision for future of general practice Watchdogs say health reforms are slow Scotland fights to prevent privatisation of general practice NHS faces 'most severe financial challenge' ever Workforce shortages and Brexit threaten long-term NHS Plan goals (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - March 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Blackouts or loss of consciousness
The challenge of a definitive diagnosis Related items fromOnMedica Earlier thrombolysis improves stroke outcomes Breath-free CPR may be best for non-experts Safety questions over adrenaline for cardiac arrest Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland MHRA tightens licence restrictions on valproate for women (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - March 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Hadrian's Wall Was a Policy Statement; So Is Donald Trump's
It's not clear if Hadrian's Wall was necessary to prevent Scottish fighters from invading the Roman Empire. Neither is it clear how effective Trump's wall would be at repelling undocumented immigration and smugglers. Hadrian's Wall may have been of symbolic value to those on both sides of it. Trump's could be, too. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - March 6, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Brian Michael Jenkins Source Type: blogs

Sensor Detects Sepsis Biomarker in Less Than Three Minutes
Fulminate sepsis is a dangerous condition, usually caused by a bacterial infection. The runaway behavior of the immune system in sepsis is still poorly understood. The trick is to diagnose it early and to use antibiotics to fight it off. These days it can take up to three days to diagnose sepsis, usually via a blood culture, which is one of the primary reasons that it is one of the main causes of death inside of hospitals. Researchers at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland have developed a sensor that can detect a common sepsis biomarker in a matter of minutes. Interleukin-6, a glycoprotein, is typically release...
Source: Medgadget - February 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Materials Pathology Source Type: blogs

Our Dead on Every Shore
By MAYURA DESHPANDE  I once made a serious error. The patient had taken an overdose of paracetamol, but because I was single-handedly covering three inpatient acute psychiatric wards due to sickness of two other trainees which medical HR had been unable to cover, with a lot of agency nurses who did not know any of the patients well at all, and also because this patient frequently said she had taken overdoses when she had not, and declined to let me take bloods to test for paracetamol levels, I believed she was crying wolf. She collapsed several hours later, and died. I was overwhelmed with feelings of guilt, inadequac...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: NHS Patients Physicians Adverse Events Mayura Deshpande Source Type: blogs

China Uses DNA to Track Its People, With the Help of American (Yale) Expertise - from a Yale scientist sadly all too familiar to this author
You saw it here on Healthcare Renewal first.In 2005 and 2007 I'd written the posts:"Academic abuses in biomedicine vs. Indigenous Peoples: The Genographic Project" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2005/09/academic-abuses-in-biomedicine-vs.html)and"Informed consent, exploitation and developing a SNP panel for forensic identification of individuals" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2007/07/informed-consent-and-developing-snp.html)respectively.The theme of these posts was that genetics research (especially that centering on profiling) by unscrupulous scientists could have unforeseen, adverse (if not devastatin...
Source: Health Care Renewal - February 25, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: Allele Frequency Database China genetics Kelsang Dolma Kenneth Kidd Uighurs Yale Yale Daily News Source Type: blogs

For Those Who Are Serious About Increasing Access to MAT for Opioid Use Disorder …
The synthetic opioid methadone, developed in Germany in the 1930s for the treatment of severe pain, has been employed for the Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) of heroin addiction and opioid use disorder since the 1960s. In the US, methadone clinics are tightly regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  Patients receiving methadone to treat their addiction must ingest it under the observation and supervision of clinic staff, who keep it in a lock box. Eventually, patients are permitted to take a few doses home with them for use over the weeken...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 25, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Guidance on the review of PPU arrangements under the Private Healthcare Market Investigation Order 2014
Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) - This guidance sets out the CMA ’s approach to reviewing Private Patient Unit (PPU) arrangements. That is, arrangements for a private hospital operator to operate, manage, or otherwise provide privately-funded healthcare services at a private patient unit in England, Wales, Northern Ireland, or Scotland.GuidanceMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 20, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Regulation, governance and accountability Source Type: blogs

Innovative Skin to Electrically Power Prosthetic Devices
Powered prosthetic devices need a great deal of electricity to energize them throughout the day. Researchers at the University of Glasgow in Scotland have developed a combination electronic “skin” that can generate and store electricity for prosthetic devices. The technology consists of layers of a finely tuned graphite-polyurethane composite covered by graphene, a material only one carbon atom in thickness. The graphite-polyurethane works as an electric supercapacitor, storing energy that can be used at any time by a prosthetic. The graphene component is essentially a solar panel that converts sunlight to elec...
Source: Medgadget - February 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Materials Rehab Source Type: blogs

Will US Drug Policymakers Blow It Again —This Time With Benzodiazepines?
In a recent  column, Maia Szalavitz reports on the rise in overdose deaths related to benzodiazepines (a class of tranquilizers including Xanax, Valium, and Ativan). According to a recent  study in JAMA, the number benzodiazepine prescriptions doubled in the US   from 2003 to 2015. And benzodiazepines are found in the bloodstream of almost a third of all opioid overdose victims—a nearly ten-fold increase since the beginning of this century. Szalavitz reminds us that the US is not the only developed country with an overdose problem from the nonmedical use of prescription drugs: ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 14, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Ethnicity
Don't get me wrong. I love Elizabeth Warren. She has spent her distinguished academic and political career fighting for justice and equity. She sees right through the BS thrown up in justification for plutocracy and talks to people in plain language with no apologies for her progressive beliefs. I think she'd make a great president.But . . .I do think that her repeated claims on various official documents that she has Native American heritage -- and even, on her Texas bar application that sheis straight up Native American -- are very strange behavior that she has not sufficiently explored and explained in public. She says ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 13, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Bob Murphy on Free Banking in Canada
A few months aftermy April 2018 Soho debate with him concerning whether fractional reserve banking is damaging to an economy ’s health, Bob Murphy gave a lecture on “Rothbardians vs. ‘Free Bankers’ on Fractional Reserve Banking.”Bob devotes asubstantial chunk of that lecture to elaborating upon what he considers shortcomings of my particular arguments in favor of free banking. Though he is generous enough to allow that my theoretical arguments are not quite a cinch to refute, he thinks rather less of the empirical evidence I offer in support of those arguments. In particular, he calls the evid...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 12, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Screen time - a moral panic for the 21st century?
Why moderation may be the safest approach Related items fromOnMedica Hundreds of schools set to test mental health support techniques Experts urge radical action on mental health crises We are ‘sitting on a young people’s health time bomb’ Parental illness linked to children's increased use of health services Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - February 8, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Retaliation against physicians reporting EHR flaws that cause use errors? Physicians subpoenaed in Rhode Island, allegedly after reporting EHR risks
It appears that way to my eye.  First, on use errors (as opposed to user errors from carelessness):“Use error” is a term used very specifically by NIST to refer to user interface designs that will engender users to make errors of commission or omission. It is true that users do make errors, but many errors are due not to user error per se but due to designs that are flawed, e.g., poorly written messaging, misuse of color-coding conventions, omission of information, etc. From"NISTIR 7804: Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records." It is available a...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 29, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: David Levesque healthcare IT difficulties Lifespan retaliation rhode island hospital use error Source Type: blogs

Contained and controlled: the UK ’s 20-year vision for antimicrobial resistance
Department of Health and Social Care -This document contains a plan on how the UK will contribute to containing and controlling antimicrobial resistance by 2040. The vision and plan were developed across the government, its agencies and administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, with support from a range of stakeholders. It is supported by the UK five-year action plan for antimicrobial resistance 2019 to 2024.ReportFive year planDepartment of Health and Social Care - publications  (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - January 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Isle of Dreams
Zac Beauchamp provides a good summary (though lengthy) of the impossible twist of the knickers the Brits have gotten themselves into. The Brexit referendum only passed in the first place because its proponents lied to the voters. Even so, it depended on xenophobia and racism to attract a majority. Because it was premised on lies, it is literally impossible to produce the result that proponents promised, and are still pretending to demand.I don't want to belabor the details here, some of which I have discussed before. The Ireland-Northern Ireland border problem is insoluble, as is the problem of British citizens living on t...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 16, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Can watching sports be bad for your health?
As the new year begins, sports fans rejoice! You’ve had the excitement of the college football bowl games and the national championship, the NFL playoff games are winnowing teams down to the Super Bowl contestants, and basketball and hockey seasons are in full swing. There’s even some early talk of spring training for the upcoming Major League Baseball season. While I hate to rain on anyone’s parade, the truth is that there can be health risks associated with watching sports. I’ve seen it firsthand while working in a walk-in clinic near Fenway Park, where people would show up bleeding from cuts that...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Bohemian Waxwings
First time I saw Bohemian Waxwings  (Bombycilla garrulus), a flock of 80 or so were in trees at the parking area on the Cambridge Science Park. I heard their unmistakable tweeting first but didn’t catch a photo before they flocked off down Milton Road. After that, I kept my ear to the air (well the UK Waxwings twitter feed) in the hope of more sightings as the winter went on. Never did see them again to photograph… …until we were visiting Newcastle and I heard that there were apparently a dozen or so in berry-rich trees opposite St Bartholomew’s Church in Long Benton. The trees are...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - December 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Individual 1 and cash washing
A commenter (unpublished, because I'm responding to it here) asks why I'm so confident that individual 1's business consists of laundering money for Russian mobsters. The caseis made here, by John Feffer, and it's pretty compelling. Too long, do read, but a couple of money shots:Before he became president, Donald Trump was basically an unsuccessful businessman who managed, time and again, to fail upward. He filed for bankruptcy six times  — five times for his casinos and once for the Plaza Hotel.. . . An astounding number of his other business ventures have gone belly up too, including Trump Airli...
Source: Stayin' Alive - December 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

State-backed or practice-backed indemnity?
A ‘rescue package’ that is not all what it seems Related items fromOnMedica Review published to protect doctors over medical errors Doctors believe patient care has worsened Rapid review ordered into medical manslaughter laws Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing ‘Prioritise’ junior doctors’ mental health, bosses told (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - December 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

A New Brexit Referendum Would Indeed Be A Betrayal of The First
Ilya Somin offers  a typically thoughtful case for why a second Brexit referendum would not be a betrayal of the 2016 result. His argument, as I read it, is this: Theresa May’s likely defeat on her dreadful proposed Withdrawal Agreement grants an opportunity to reassess the wisdom of leaving the EU. Given a referendum was the means of making the decision to leave, a referendum is a perfectly legitimate mechanism to test whether the public still wants to. Ergo, deciding to ultimately Remain in a second referendum would not betray the result of the first vote.I disagree.A second referendum so soon would viola...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Central Bank Digital Currency Threatens Financial Privacy and Economic Growth
Discussion Note (November 2018).[4] For theory and evidence on this point seeLastrapes and Selgin (2012).[Cross-posted from Alt-M.org] (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

Hepatocellular carcinoma risk, cirrhosis and hepatitis C
High profile public health strategy needed Related items fromOnMedica Overweight teens more likely to have severe liver disease later Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 JCVI recommends universal HPV vaccination Lower cancer risk in people with higher vitamin D levels Public drastically underestimates cannabis risks (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - December 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Radiology Crisis in the UK Forces 56,000 Angina Patients to Forgo CT Scans
In the United Kingdom, around 56,000 patients with angina, a chest condition that can decrease blood flow to the heart, were unable to undergo necessary CT scans last year due to the region ’s radiologist shortage.According to a recent review from the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) and the British Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (BSCI), there should have been 132,090 CT coronary angiography (CTCA) tests performed throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland in 2017. However, only 75,791 —or 57 percent — of those tests were administered.Approximately 69,900 scans were performed in Engla...
Source: radRounds - November 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Scottish Banks and the Bank Restriction, 1797-1821, Part 3
Having considered, intwoprevious essays, the origins, legality, and adverse consequences of the Scottish bank suspension, we ’re now ready to ask whether, and in what ways, that episode compels us to reconsider the virtues of free banking, both as practiced in Scotland and in general.If the Scottish bankers were indeed guilty of “violating the property rights of their depositors and noteholders,” asMurray Rothbard and some others charge, does that mean that it ’s not legitimate to treat the Scottish episode as an example of the advantages of freedom in banking? Does it mean that free banking on a fr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 13, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

LGBT in Britain: health report
This study shows the rates of depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions among LGBT people. It also looks into the accessibility of healthcare services and discrimination LGBT people face when seeking medical support.ReportPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - November 8, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Equality and diversity Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs