Plant-based diet linked to lower risk of heart failure
We should prioritise heart failure prevention as it is so debilitating, costly and hard to treat Related items fromOnMedica Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Omega 3 from seafood linked to healthier ageing Physical activity might offset harms of time spent sitting Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Women less likely than men to achieve CHD targets (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Physical activity might offset harms of time spent sitting
Reducing sitting time and increasing activity levels both important in reducing CVD mortality Related items fromOnMedica Plant-based diet linked to lower risk of heart failure Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland Omega 3 from seafood linked to healthier ageing Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised CHD and stroke risk seriously elevated with just one daily cigarette (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Scotland ’s persistent health inequalities ‘unjust but not inevitable’
Actions to redistribute income would have the greatest effect on health inequalities at population level Related items fromOnMedica Prioritise and fund prevention to save lives and NHS, warn doctors We are ‘sitting on a young people’s health time bomb’ Health Outcome Framework may include measure on loneliness UK child health near bottom in Europe Worsening death rates ‘must be investigated’ (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Nigerian brothers say actor Jussie Smollett orchestrated his fake attack; will Chicago DA prosecute him NOW?
(Natural News) “O, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive!” That famous quotation comes from 19th-century Scottish novelist Walter Scott, but it is certainly appropriate today as it applies to the re-emerging hate hoax scandal involving actor Jussie Smollett, of “Empire” fame. It seems as though he may have had... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prostate cancer in Scotland: an evolutionary journey
Clinical nurse specialist Karen Walker explores the evolutionary journey of prostate cancer within hospitals and how the development of new technologies and treatments has contributed to improvements in outcomes Related items fromOnMedica Immune system boosters fight prostate cancer One-off PSA test doesn ’t save lives, finds largest study of its kind Radiotherapy offers hopes in advanced prostate cancer Prostate cancer diagnosis (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - April 22, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

GMC promises fewer investigations into one-off mistakes
Speedy assessment process has seen more cases closed without going to formal stage Related items fromOnMedica Doctors believe patient care has worsened GPs welcome 'biggest reform to services in 15 years' Plans afoot to end cover-up culture in NHS ‘Make GP partnerships more attractive than locum work’ Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 19, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Scottish MPs demand full report on 'risky' restraint cases
Opposition parties in Scotland have called for the full publication of a report into the “shocking” treatment of patients at a Dundee mental health unit, after BBC report leaked information on “risky” restraints. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - April 18, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Surgical safety checklist linked to decline in hospital deaths
After the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist went into effect in 2018, patient deaths after surgeries fell by a third in Scotland. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Practice reveals appointment waits were cut by 21% after adding a self-care note for colds on phone
The automated message would give patients advice they can use at home. It was a success at Teviot Medical Practice in Hawick, Scotland, suggesting it could relieve a GP shortage crisis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hospital deaths after surgery fall after launch of surgical safety checklists in Scotland
(Wiley) The World Health Organization (WHO) created the Surgical Safety Checklist over a decade ago, in an effort to reduce mortality after surgery. The BJS (British Journal of Surgery) has published a study that used a national database to look at the records of over 12 million patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins safe for rheumatoid arthritis patients
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits as other individuals Related items fromOnMedica Lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes can have long-term effect Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland Brexit could result in thousands of extra CVD deaths CHD and stroke risk seriously elevated with just one daily cigarette Obesity associated with worse mortality and higher CVD risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 16, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Call from RCM to end bullying and harassment of NHS staff
Words must be turned into action to eradicate bullying and harassment affecting midwifery and neonatal staff, the Royal College of Midwives has said ahead of a congress held in Scotland this week. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - April 15, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Neolithic dog reveals tales behind Orkney's monuments
World ’s first canine forensic reconstruction sheds light on lives of ancient communitiesThe head of a dog that lived onOrkney 4,500 years ago has been recreated in what experts believe is the world ’s first canine forensic reconstruction.The dog had been domesticated in the Neolithic era on the Scottish island archipelago, but still carried wolf-like characteristics, standing about the size of a large collie, according to Historic Environment Scotland (HES) which jointly commissioned the reconstruction with the National Museum of Scotland.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Esther Addley Tags: Scotland Archaeology Dogs Animals Science UK news Heritage Culture Source Type: news

The Risks of Getting a Tattoo Are Rare, But Real. Here ’s What to Know
Nearly three in 10 Americans have a tattoo, yet ink is still somewhat stigmatized. Many job seekers and office workers hide their body art rather than risk disapproval from higher-ups. Research also finds that tattoo stigma is widespread. A recent study, published in the journal Stigma and Health, found that when hypothetical patients with HIV or lung cancer had tattoos, others were more likely to blame them for their high health care costs compared to tattoo-free folks with the same illnesses. The study provides “initial evidence that tattooed individuals face health disparities,” the study authors write. Ta...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

NHS dentist charges rise by 5% in England
From the BBC https://www.bbc.com/news/health-47724076An inflation-busting hike in dentistry fees mean NHS patients in England will pay £1.10 extra for a routine check-up.The new charges, which begin on Monday, will also see the cost of a set of dentures rise by £12.80 to nearly £270.Dentistry leaders say charges are increasingly being relied on and in the future dentistry could end up as an NHS service " in name only " .But the government said charges were important to help keep services sustainable.The new charges are:Band 1 treatment (examination, X-rays and scale and polish) £22.70Band ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - April 12, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Are active children and young people at increased risk of injuries resulting in hospital admission or accident and emergency department attendance? Analysis of linked cohort and electronic hospital records in Wales and Scotland - Griffiths LJ, Cortina-Borja M, Tingay K, Bandyopadhyay A, Akbari A, Destavola BL, Bedford H, Lyons RA, Dezateux C.
INTRODUCTION: Children and young people (CYP) are encouraged to increase time spent being physically active, especially in moderate and vigorous intensity pursuits. However, there is limited evidence on the prospective association of activity levels with i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Childhood HPV vaccination 'profoundly' cuts cervical disease in young women
(Reuters Health) - - Young women who received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines as adolescents had significantly lower rates of a condition that's a precursor to cervical cancer, in a nationwide study in Scotland. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Occupational health nurses celebrate staff wellbeing award win
Occupational health nurses at Scotland ’s national hospital are celebrating after the organisation yet again achieved top recognition for efforts to boost staff wellbeing. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - April 9, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Safe staffing a ‘ vital ’ campaign for NHS ’ s frontline staff
The lack of safe staffing on wards and in ambulances is putting patients and staff at risk, UNISON’s health conference heard today. Once again in Bournemouth delegates were told about an aspect of members’ working lives that was causing stress and anxiety, which in turn was leading to people leaving their jobs and even more understaffing. James Anthony (pictured) of the health service group executive said that nurses in hospitals and community settings must be prepared to stand together “and where necessary take industrial action to defend patient care and safe staffing.” Speaking on the motion &ldq...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 9, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Article News 2019 Health Conference health care NHS staff safe staffing Source Type: news

More Evidence HPV Vaccine Cuts Cervical Cancer Rate
MONDAY, April 8, 2019 -- Scotland is already seeing a payoff for vaccinating adolescent girls for human papillomavirus (HPV). Since the vaccine became routine about a decade ago, cervical cancer cases in young Scottish women have plummeted, a new... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 8, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

HPV vaccine linked to ‘dramatic reduction’ in cervical disease
Routine vaccination of girls aged 12 or 13 years with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Scotland has led to a dramatic reduction in cervical disease in later life, according to a UK study. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - April 8, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Report on vaginal mesh complication care due this autumn in Scotland
Expert working group tasked to make recommendations on resourcing, training and organisation of care Related items fromOnMedica NHS funding boost to support new mothers ’ mental health Some hospitals tell women requesting caesareans to go elsewhere Eight in ten stillbirths might have been avoided Maternity care better in some respects – but still many problems Hospitals fail women with myocardial infarction (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 8, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Chemotherapy doses review after 14 NHS Tayside patients die
An independent doctor will look at cases after NHS Tayside gave lower chemotherapy doses than elsewhere in Scotland. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health claims on many children ’s foods ‘confusing’, say researchers
Stricter regulations on food labelling and product content needed, they urge Related items fromOnMedica UK children have already eaten 18 years ’ worth of sugar by 10th birthday Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Act urgently on total junk food ad ban, say doctors and public Campaigners call for 18 age limit on energy drinks Doctors urge ban on children buying caffeinated energy drinks (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 5, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Environment Agency staff back industrial action over pay
Workers at the Environment Agency are to take industrial action after a below-inflation pay rise was forced on staff earlier this year, UNISON said today (Thursday). Staff overwhelmingly backed industrial action in their demand for a fairer offer than the 1.3% rise they were given back in January.  More than 85% of votes cast supported taking action, which includes stopping unpaid overtime and work travel during personal time. Senior managers at the Agency have refused to make a better offer or hold further talks, despite repeated UNISON efforts. Staff are angered their pay falls short of incr...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release environment agency Source Type: news

Have e-cigarettes renormalised or displaced youth smoking? Results of a segmented regression analysis of repeated cross sectional survey data in England, Scotland and Wales
Time series analysis (248,324 people aged 13-15 in Great Britain between 1998-2015) found no evidence that renormalisation of youth smoking was occurring during a period of rapid growth and limited regulation of e-cigarettes from 2011 to 2015. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HPV vaccine: What is HPV? How does it cause cervical cancer?
HPV IMMUNISATION has led to a dramatic decline in the disease in Scotland, according to new data released by the British Medical Journal. What is HPV and how does it cause cervical cancer? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More global deaths from poor diet than from smoking
Focus should be on increasing intake of beneficial foods, not simply restricting sugar and fat Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Public health chiefs set out NHS plan targets We are ‘sitting on a young people’s health time bomb’ Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Sweetened drinks greater risk for poor glycaemic control (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Edinburgh science festival charity bans fossil fuel sponsorship
Edinburgh Science faced protests from activists for taking money from oil firmsThe charity running theEdinburgh international science festival is to ban sponsorship from oil companies including Shell and Total after protests by climate campaigners.Edinburgh Science said on Wednesday it realised its commitment to educating people on climate change was substantially compromised by accepting money from fossil fuel companies.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Severin Carrell Scotland editor Tags: Fossil fuel divestment Climate change Edinburgh Environmental activism Scotland UK news Royal Dutch Shell Science Business Oil Oil and gas companies Energy industry Source Type: news

Fossil record: Dippy the dinosaur proves huge attraction in Scotland
More than 373,000 people have visited replica diplodocus since it arrived in Glasgow in JanuaryDippy the dinosaur raises its elegant neck towards the vaulted ceiling of the Centre Hall in Glasgow ’s Kelvingrove Museum. The 21-metre-long replica diplodocus skeleton appears nonchalant in advance of the anticipated onrush of young fans during Scotland’s Easter school holidays.Since the Natural History Museum ’s much-loved exhibit arrived in January on the only Scottish stop of its three-year UK-wide tour, the reception has been rapturous, with more than 373,000 visitors so far, already besting the next most ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Libby Brooks Scotland correspondent Tags: Scotland Dinosaurs Glasgow UK news Museums Science Zoology Fossils Source Type: news

Weight loss targets exceeded on NHS type 2 diabetes prevention programme
Patients on the programme have lost an average of 3.4kg - over one kilogram more than originally predicted Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised One person diagnosed with diabetes every three minutes Diabetes and obesity higher among LGBQ teens Tackling obesity ‘must be made a national priority’ (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 3, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The construction of allegedly abused children's narratives in Scottish criminal courts - Prince ER, Andrews SJ, Lamb ME, Foster JLH.
This study investigated lawyers' use of social narratives surrounding child sexual abuse when questioning 66 5- to 17-year-old alleged victims in Scottish criminal courts using a mixed-methods approach. Thematic analysis found that the use of beliefs and s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

New checks that could soon replace those 'embarrassing' smear tests
Pamela Nelis, from Greenock, Renfrewshire, in Scotland, was diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2012 after ignoring her screening appointments for two decades. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors may have to report people vulnerable to knife crime
Home office considering introducing a new duty which mean doctors will be obliged to report people at risk of involvement in knife crime Related items fromOnMedica The star fish and the link worker Joined-up care in action Experts urge radical action on mental health crises Social prescribing workers to ease GP pressure Scotland sets out its Public Health priorities (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 2, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Trips to the toilet at night suggest high blood pressure
People who get up to use the toilet at night may have high blood pressure, study suggests Related items fromOnMedica ‘Health warnings needed on ready meals and Chinese takeaways’ Food industry misses almost half of salt targets Brexit could result in thousands of extra CVD deaths Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland Cycling and treadmill workstations better for health (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 2, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A bald gene find ­ ing
(University of Helsinki) Hairlessness in dogs can be the result of deliberate breeding or, in certain breeds, a defect. A recent study completed at the University of Helsinki describes a gene variant in the SGK3 gene, which causes hairlessness in Scottish deerhounds. The gene defect results in puppies born with thin fur that lose all of their hair in a few weeks. SGK3 is also a candidate for association with non-hormonal baldness in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One year on: Scottish GP contract makes good progress
But government urged to step up the pace of change Related items fromOnMedica Pressures force GPs to take only emergency patients Patients with multiple health problems make up most GP consultations General practice has ‘serious structural faults’ Guidance issued on prescribing responsibilities GP gatekeepers linked to reduced patient satisfaction (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 1, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Psychological abuse criminalised in Scotland
Domestic Abuse Act comes into force today Related items fromOnMedica Maternity care better in some respects – but still many problems Scotland sets out its Public Health priorities Health Outcome Framework may include measure on loneliness We are ‘sitting on a young people’s health time bomb’ UK lagging behind peers on child health (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 1, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

If you can ’t embrace regional dialect, you can kiss my chuddies | Katy Guest
The Oxford English Dictionary ’s inclusion of regional terms shows off what the UK has in common – linguistic ingenuityIn a rare piece of happy news to distract us momentarily from all the chaos, those lovely linguists at the Oxford English Dictionary haveannounced an abundance of new words all taken from regional dialects.The new entries include the Indian-English phrase “kiss my chuddies”; the delicious word “jibbons”, which is what spring onions are called in Wales; and the Scottish words “sitooterie”, which is (obviously) a place to sit out, and “bidie-in” (&l...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Katy Guest Tags: British identity and society Language UK news Reference and languages books Science Social trends Source Type: news

Researchers: Woman's gene mutation prevents pain sensation
A woman from Scotland has an extremely rare condition that doctors have not understood, until now. In her 71 years, she has felt no pain, and has had no need for medications. Roxana Saberi explains. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Woman feels no pain due to rare gene mutation, researchers say
New research is shedding light on the genetic reasons why a woman in Scotland feels virtually no pain. Jo Cameron, 71, also experiences very little anxiety or fear, and her body appears to heal quickly. Now scientists say they know why: a mutation in a previously unidentified gene. Elizabeth Palmer reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Allogeneic CAR-T Specialists TC BioPharm Appoint Prof John Anderson as Scientific and Medical Director
Gamma Delta CAR-T pioneer will accelerate clinical translation of pipeline. GLASGOW, Scotland, March 29, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- TC BioPharm (TCB), leaders in the development of tumor-targeting gamma delta T (GDT) cells, today... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, Personnel TC BioPharm, gamma delta T cells, CAR-T (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Male GPs earn a third more than females
GP gender gap higher than average Related items fromOnMedica Health secretary ‘committed’ to contract negotiations Brexit creates uncertainty for EU care workers in Scotland NHS staff report stress, violence and dissatisfaction with pay Ageing medical workforce - a growing trend Scotland to introduce legal requirement on NHS staffing (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 29, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Brexit: Drug export ban advised by pharmacy bosses
Scottish CMO issues advice on no-deal Brexit Related items fromOnMedica NHS saves £324m by switching to cheaper medicines Guidance issued on prescribing responsibilities Stroke survivors need more help taking medicine Eight in ten stillbirths might have been avoided NHS lagging on preventing cancer and heart deaths (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 29, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Woman Feels No Pain, Thanks to Gene Mutations
And not only does her DNA allow Jo Cameron, a former school teacher from Scotland, to avoid physical pain, it also keeps her largely anxiety-free, too. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Woman who feels no pain has genetic mutation, scientists discover
A 71-year-old Scottish woman has a rare genetic mutation that means she feels less pain, heals faster and experiences less anxiety than most people. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

At 71, She ’ s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why.
Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Opioids and Opiates Pain-Relieving Drugs Anxiety and Stress University College London Scotland Jo Cameron The British Journal of Anaesthesia Source Type: news

Scottish man could only speak MALAY for a day when he woke from a coma
Fraser, now 60, from Edinburgh, spoke Malay and Chinese as a child due to growing up in Borneo because of his civil engineer father's line of work. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Woman who feels no pain could help scientists develop new painkillers
Jo Cameron, a 71-year-old Scottish woman, has never needed to take painkillers after seeing the dentist and can eat spicy Scotch Bonnet chillies without any discomfort. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

At Age 71, She Has Never Felt Pain or Anxiety
Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Opioids and Opiates Pain-Relieving Drugs Anxiety and Stress University College London Scotland Jo Cameron The British Journal of Anaesthesia Source Type: news