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Preclinical study demonstrates promising treatment for rare bone disease
(Sanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have led a preclinical study demonstrating that the drug palovarotene suppresses the formation of bony tumors (osteochondromas) in models of multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE). The research, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, is an important step toward an effective pharmacological treatment for MHE, a rare genetic condition that affects about 1 in 50,000 people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Snapping Scapula Syndrome
What is snapping scapula syndrome? Snapping scapula syndrome is a condition causing painful grinding, clicking or snapping of the shoulder blade (Figure 1). The shoulder joint itself is called the glenohumeral joint. The acromioclavicular joint is associated with shoulder separation. Snapping scapula occurs at the scapulothoracic joint and is different from other shoulder related problems (Figure 2). Over 1/3 of the shoulder movement occurs between the scapula and the thoracic cage. The shoulder blade serves as an anchor for the subscapularis and serratus anterior muscles (Figure 3). These muscles as well as the...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study identifies mechanisms underlying osteochondroma formation
(Journal of Clinical Investigation) In this issue of JCI Insight, Antonios Aliprantis and colleagues at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston demonstrate that loss of the genes encoding nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c2 (known as NFATs) induce osteochondroma formation in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 7, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Absence of specific enzyme in cartilage can lead to benign tumors in mice
Rhode Island Hospital researchers have found that the absence of the Shp-2 enzyme near specialized cartilage cells can lead to the development of multiple benign cartilage tumors in mice, a model that recapitulates the rare human tumor syndrome metachondromatosis. Shp2 is an enzyme in the cell that regulates the activity of other proteins and signaling pathways. Mice lacking Shp2 formed two types of tumors: enchondromas and osteochondromas, and also developed deformed joints. The study is published online in advance of print in the journal Nature... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bones / Orthopedics Source Type: news

RI Hospital: Absence of specific enzyme in cartilage can lead to benign tumors in mice
(Lifespan) Rhode Island Hospital researchers have found that the absence of the Shp-2 enzyme near specialized cartilage cells can lead to the development of multiple benign cartilage tumors in mice, a model that recapitulates the rare human tumor syndrome metachondromatosis. Shp2 is an enzyme in the cell that regulates the activity of other proteins and signaling pathways. Mice lacking Shp2 formed two types of tumors: enchondromas and osteochondromas, and also developed deformed joints. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news