How Common Are Bone Spurs in Young Athletes?

Discussion The terminology of abnormal calcification of soft tissues and uses of the terms is often muddied. Especially as the causes may be similar and multiple adjacent tissues may be involved. An exostosis is an abnormal proliferation of bone from the joint. They can appear in various forms and in many locations. An osteophyte is also known as a bone spur and is type of exostosis. Osteophytes are thought to be periosteal or synovial mesenchymal stems cells that become calcified. They usually have a more narrow or pointed projection from the joint. Osteophytes are a very common feature of osteoarthritis. Enthesophytes are abnormal bony projections at the attachment of a tendon or ligament. These are often due to trauma and examples commonly occur at the knee or heel, such as Osgood Schlater disease. Exostosis variants include: Osteochrondroma – usually a solitary, non-tender, slow-growing mass in long bones (more commonly lower extremity). Radiographically they can be sessile or stalked in appearance. This is the most common skeletal tumor (10-15%). They occur especially during the bony growth period. Complications occur in about 4% of patients and include fractures, bony deformation, and compression causing neurovascular problems. Hereditary multiple exostosis – an autosomal dominant disorder with multiple masses in all parts of the body except the head. They are very common in the lower extremity particularly the knee. Short stature may also be seen. Trevor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news