Podcast: Using Death as Motivation to Live
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - April 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

The Quality Of The Relationship Between Parents Can Shape Their Children ’s Life Paths
By Emily Reynolds Our relationship with our parents can have a big impact on our life trajectory. Research has found that those of us lied to by caregivers often end up less well-adjusted, that hard workers are more likely to produce children with good work ethics, that cognitive skills can be improved by having talkative parents, and that positive parenting can impact cortisol levels even years later. But though we might pay less attention to it, how parents relate to one another is also important for children’s long-term development. A new study, published in Demography, has taken a look at affection within pa...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Educational Social Source Type: blogs

Alcohol Use Disorder in the API Community
Asian-American Pacific Islanders, also known as the API Community, are one of the fastest-growing minority groups in America. Due to model minority stereotypes and a lack of empirical data, the API community has been thought to have lower than expected rates of substance use disorders and behavioral addictions. However, alcohol use disorder in the API Community still exists, and it presents its own set of unique issues compared to other ethnicities and communities. These can include specific risk factors and barriers to treatment that other groups do not face. What is the API Community? In 1968, the term “Asian Amer...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 24, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcohol use Alcoholics An Source Type: blogs

How Does Sleeping Well Impact Brain Detoxification?
You're reading How Does Sleeping Well Impact Brain Detoxification?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Have you been sleeping well lately? We all know that getting enough sleep is an important part of living a healthy and engaged life. Of course, getting a good night's sleep keeps you sharp during the day, and recent science has also shown how important it is in learning and memory. Sleep is not only good for helping you pay attention in class or remembering what you did yesterday though, it also helps keep ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - December 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Wilson Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement better sleep brain health science of sleep Source Type: blogs

Free the Eyebrow Threaders
One of the encouraging signs for the future of liberty is the spread of state-based groups engaging in constitutional litigation, often with a focus on economic liberty – protecting the right to earn an honest living and thus to pursue the American Dream. That’s why I recently joined the Mississippi Center for Public Policy (MCPP) as a nonresident senior fellow and chairman of the board of advisors to MCPP’s legal arm, the Mississippi Justice Institute (MJI).Today, MJI filed anew federal lawsuit and joined the ongoing legal fight against occupational licensing laws. MJI ’s client is Dipa Bhattarai, ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 13, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Case 098
Dr James Rippey Ultrasound Case 098 A 55 year old man presents with upper calf tenderness and slight swelling. He has just returned from trekking in Nepal. He has a minor knee effusion clinically with tender subtle swelling of his upper calf. You consider the probable differential as DVT, calf muscle injury and Baker's cyst with or without rupture. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 23, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr James Rippey Tags: TOP 100 Ultrasound Baker cyst Baker's cyst speech bubble Top 100 ultrasounds Source Type: blogs

Can Digital Health Go Off-Grid And Still Save Lives?
What would you do without your smartphone or laptop for a week? Some cannot even imagine putting them down for a second, not thinking much of the vulnerability of our entire digital existence. What if a hurricane destroys the electric grid? What if power supplies will get cut off by unstoppable rain? What about a future dystopic scenario with our traditional energy sources depleted due to overconsumption? And what if we just look at less fortunate parts of the world where stable electricity service is a rare treasure? We collected some examples of how medicine could become more independent from the traditional electricity ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Africa asia Caribbean development digital digital health Healthcare smartphone solar sustainability technology Source Type: blogs

Making Oncology Accessible in Nepal
By SAURABH JHA, MD In this episode of Radiology Firing Line Podcast, I speak with Bishal Gyawali MD, PhD. Dr. Gyawali obtained his medical degree from Kathmandu. He received a scholarship to pursue a PhD in Japan. Dr. Gyawali’s work focuses on getting cheap and effective treatment to under developed parts of the world. Dr. Gyawali is an advocate for evidence-based medicine. He has published extensively in many high impact journals. He coined the term “cancer groundshot.” He was a research fellow at PORTAL. He is currently a scientist at the Queen’s University Cancer Research Institute in Kingston...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Radiology Firing Line Podcasts RogueRad @roguerad Bishal Gyawali nepal Oncology Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Kunjin Virus Infection
The following background information on Kunjin virus infection is abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series [1]   Primary references are available on request. Kunjin virus (KUN), a subtype of West Nile virus, was first isolated in Australia in 1960, from mosquitoes (Culex annulirostris).  The virus is named for an Aboriginal clan living on the Mitchell River in Kowanyama, northern Queensland Most cases of human infection are reported in Australia, with sporadic reports from Nepal. Serosurveys suggest the presence of human infection in Malaysia, Indonesia and Papua New Guin...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 3, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Source Type: blogs

Around the World and Back Again: Global Mental Health Efforts
Mental illnesses are a global problem. In this director ’ s Message, Dr. Gordon discusses his recent trip to Nepal and Kenya to see how NIMH is helping bring cutting-edge research to bear on the problems facing individuals with mental illnesses in low-resource settings. (Source: NIMH Directors Blog)
Source: NIMH Directors Blog - February 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joshua Gordon Source Type: blogs

Dispatch from India
I spent last week in Bihar, an area of Northern India near Nepal.  The best way to describe the journey is in pictures.Our small team visited villages along the Ganges to the east of Patna, tracing the path of patients from seeking care to diagnosis to treatment to compliance to wellness.  We met with patients, providers, field officers (think of them as care managers), chemists (pharmacists), and labs.   Here's what we experienced:The villages had hand pumped water supplies, electricity and 4G cellular connections.  Cows and goats were a part of many households.A unique telemedicine program f...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 15, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

The Meaning of Life (as a CIO)
As I approach 60 and reflect on over 40 years in the healthcare IT industry I sometimes feel that I ’ve transitioned from a rogue upstart to the leader of the status quo - always about to be disrupted. I’m no longer a trouble maker, I calm the troubled healthcare technology waters.  If I ’m not careful, that could mean I’ll become a rate limiting step to radical change since I’ve been shaped by a lifetime of experience that started with punch cards, paper tape, and Fortran.The themes I ’ll write about twice a week in 2019 will be about exploring new technology around the world and i...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - January 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Saving Lives in Nepal with One Heart Worldwide
Maternal and infant mortality is a huge issue, world-wide. When I met Arlene Saman, the founder of One Heart Worldwide I was excited by the results they were seeing and I had ideas for ways to make the work even stronger. It was my pleasure to join the board of directors in 2015 and watch the work grow. Until this year, I’ve only watched from afar, but in 2018 my wife (@MsGreene) and I had the pleasure of joining Arlene and 14 other people to see the work first hand. Over the next few weeks, we will be releasing our audio journal of the trip. We hope you will join us on this amazing journey. Click here for more infor...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - December 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Maternal and Infant Mortality Nepal Non-profit Travel Source Type: blogs

Saving Lives in Nepal with One Heart World-Wide
Maternal and infant mortality is a huge issue, world-wide. When I met Arlene Saman, the founder of One Heart World-Wide I was excited by the results they were seeing and I had ideas for ways to make the work even stronger. It was my pleasure to join the board of directors in 2015 and watch the work grow. Until this year, I’ve only watched from afar, but in 2018 my wife (@MsGreene) and I had the pleasure of joining Arlene and 14 other people to see the work first hand. Over the next few weeks, we will be releasing our audio journal of the trip. We hope you will join us on this amazing journey. The post Saving Lives...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - December 27, 2018 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Maternal and Infant Mortality Nepal Non-profit Travel Source Type: blogs

The Digital Pickwick Club: A Nursing Home of the Future
Social companion robots, chatbots, telemedicine, digital tattoos, gamification – the necessary accessories of a nursing home of the future. Do you shake your head in disagreement thinking that’s science fiction and not the natural habitat of your grandma? Our short story of Dickens’ 21st-century reconstruction, the digital Pickwick Club will convince you otherwise. From Santa Fé to Sapporo: An artist with a robot companion 24 May, 2054. In Santa Fe, New Mexico, the smart alarm tells Amy gently that it’s time for her to get up. It’s somewhere between 5.30 and 6 a.m., wakeup adjusted to ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Medical Professionals Medical Science Fiction Patients AI artificial intelligence chatbot digital elderly elderly care future nursing home robot sci-fi short story smart home smartphone social companion robot technology Source Type: blogs

How Do Guatemalan Midwives and Smartphones Come Together?
A scarcity of infrastructure, a lack of resources for healthcare development or non-existent window opportunities for talented developers cement low-resource regions in their state for decades. The Medical Futurist argues that disruptive digital health innovations as technology transfers through collaborations are the safest and fastest way out. Cheap and creative solutions with low-key infrastructural needs embedded into the socio-economic background, just like the examples below. Leap instead of gradual development Technology transfer means the adaptation of best practices and technical know-how to an environment where t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Portable Diagnostics Telemedicine & Smartphones asia digital health disruptive guatemala Innovation low resource medical mobile phone nepal south america technology transfer Source Type: blogs

How Do Guatemalan Midwives and Smartphones Come Together?
A scarcity of infrastructure, a lack of resources for healthcare development or non-existent window opportunities for talented developers cement low-resource regions in their state for decades. The Medical Futurist argues that disruptive digital health innovations as technology transfers through collaborations are the safest and fastest way out. These are cheap and creative solutions with low-key infrastructural needs embedded into the socio-economic background, just like the examples below. Leap instead of gradual development Technology transfer means the adaptation of best practices and technical know-how to an environme...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Portable Diagnostics Telemedicine & Smartphones asia digital health disruptive guatemala Innovation low resource medical mobile phone nepal south america technology transfer Source Type: blogs

Health4TheWorld Named Tech Startup of The Year: Interview with Founders
Health4TheWorld, a Silicon Valley start-up providing education and technology solutions for resource-poor communities worldwide, has been named the 2018 Stevie Silver Award Winner by the American Business Awards for the category of Services. Created in 2002, the Stevie Awards are meant to “honor and generate public recognition of the achievements and positive contributions of organizations and working professionals worldwide.” One of the competition judges described Health4TheWorld as, “One of the best uses of technology to help patients with limited access to healthcare.” Commenting on the rec...
Source: Medgadget - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

The caste system is thriving in medicine in the U.S.
On my morning commute as I read this NPR article, memories started flooding my brain. I could not control myself and had to write this. My last name “Theetha Kariyanna” has its origin from a small village Theetha and added to it is my dad’s name Kariyanna (a local folk god). Back in my school days, the name was weird to my friends as the name Kariyanna also literally translates to “black brother.” As a kid who was hesitant to loudly say his name clear and loud, I have grown up to say my name loudly with pride as I often do: “Hello there, I am Dr. Kariyanna, your heart doctor today.&rdquo...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pramod-theetha-kariyanna" rel="tag" > Pramod Theetha Kariyanna, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Hospital-Based Medicine Public Health & Source Type: blogs

THCB Exclusive – Trump appoints Holt to run VA
By THCB STAFF Today Donald Trump pulled a big surprise. He changed the much criticized appointment for his new VA head from over-effusive physician Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson to well known lefty health blogger Matthew Holt. When asked why he wanted Holt to run the VA Trump said, “Look, I’m pretty smart and I’ve appointed now only the best people like John Bolton and Mike Pompeo to run our foreign policy. If I appoint someone else I like, how can I fire him quickly? That Holt guy seems to hate me, and he’s never stayed in one of my hotels, so he’s perfect for the VA–I hear that the accommoda...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Matthew Holt THCB April Fools Trump VA Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Watery Diarrhoea
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 006 Our medical student who caught shigella on a Nepalese elective has a thirst for adventure. They plan to help at a Bangladesh refugee camp but the latest CDC report states there have been some cases of cholera. They’ve done a little bit of reading and want your help to teach them all about cholera and how they may prepare and best serve their new community. Questions: Q1. What is cholera and how is it transmitted? Answer and inte...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine cholera diarrhoea john snow ORS rice water diarrhoea watery diarrhoea Source Type: blogs

 Get to Know Your Asian Indian Caucus
The AIC Caucus met this past November at the 2017 ASHA Convention in Los Angeles. A monolingual speech-language pathologist recently reached out to ASHA’s Asian Indian Caucus (AIC) for a Tamil-speaking SLP to provide services for a 70-year-old elderly New Jersey man. The patient had expressive aphasia due to a recent stroke. The AIC community—through its active listserve—immediately located a bilingual SLP who spoke English and Tamil. The SLP worked with the client’s local SLP to help him receive linguistically and culturally appropriate services. In another instance, a 35-year-old female vocalist&m...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 14, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Akila Rajappa Tags: Advocacy Audiology Speech-Language Pathology ASHA Convention Cultural Diversity Professional Development Source Type: blogs

Get to Know Your Asian Indian Caucus
A monolingual speech-language pathologist recently reached out to ASHA’s Asian Indian Caucus (AIC) for a Tamil-speaking SLP to provide services for a 70-year-old elderly New Jersey man. The patient had expressive aphasia due to a recent stroke. The AIC community—through its active listserve—immediately located a bilingual SLP who spoke English and Tamil. The SLP worked with the client’s local SLP to help him receive linguistically and culturally appropriate services. In another instance, a 35-year-old female vocalist— referred to the AIC by a laryngologist in California—was seeking consu...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - March 14, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Akila Rajappa Tags: Advocacy Audiology Slider Speech-Language Pathology ASHA Convention Cultural Diversity Professional Development Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 004 Bloody Diarrhoea
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 004 A medical student who has just returned from their elective in Nepal presents with 1 week of bloody diarrhoea. He has been in the lowlands and stayed with a family in the local village he was helping at. It started three days before he left and he decided to get home on the plane in the hope it would settle. He is now opening his bowels 10x a day with associated cramps, fevers and has started feeling dizzy. Questions: Q1. What is dyse...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine amoebic dysentery bacillary dysentery e.histolytica entamoeba histolytica shigellosis Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 223
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 223. Question 1 Puskar Nepal set a Guinness World record for doing what 134 times in 60 seconds? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet149167703'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink149167703')) Kicking himself in t...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five bungee jumping exophthalmos Graves disease Graves orbitopathy haemorrhoids kicking menstruation Puskar Nepal retinal detachment retinal haemorrhage St Fiacre Stellwag's sign subconjunctival haemorrhage Wal Source Type: blogs

Matthew Holt ’ s EOY 2017 letter (charities/issues/gossip)
Right at the end of every year I write a letter summarizing my issues and charities. And as I own the joint here, I post it on THCB! Please take a look–Matthew Holt Well 2017 has been quite a year, and last year 2016 I failed to get my end-of-year letter out at all. This I would like to think was due to extreme business but it probably came down to me being totally lazy. On the other hand like many of you I may have just been depressed about the election–2016 was summed up by our cat vomiting on our bed at 11.55 on New Years Eve. Having said that even though most of you will never comment on this letter and I ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Matthew Holt Charity Patient Activism Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

The 1000th Thread!
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a "discussion blog", comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethicsd...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - December 24, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Zebrafish Scrapbook
Name: Danio rerio Hometown: Freshwater ponds and rivers of India, Nepal, and neighboring countries Occupation: Research Long-term goal: Solving the basic mysteries of life Work site: More than 600 science labs worldwide That’s me and some other zebrafish, swimming in a tank in one of the more than 600 labs around the world that use us to study embryo development, genetics, and all kinds of human diseases. Credit: Wikimedia Commons, Azul. Apart from the tell-tale stripes that give me my nickname, zebrafish, I look a lot like your standard minnow swimming in the shallows of any pond, lake, or river. But I like to thi...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - December 7, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Beth Azar Tags: Genetics Research Organisms; Cool Creatures; Regeneration Source Type: blogs

Here ’s how a trip to Nepal stopped this medical student’s depression
“Please walk slowly,” cautioned Sunita, my interpreter, as I crept down the stony switchback trail towards the rural Nepali village of Dhulikhel. Sunita, in her petite navy ballet flats, hopped down the rocks as easily as the speckled goats grazing nearby. Emboldened by her speed, I stepped along eagerly, only to catch my size-ten neon running sneaker on a root and splat face-first into the dust. Looking up, I saw four women standing outside their clay-walled homes, their hands pressed to their mouths, their eyes sparkling with stifled laughter. Talk about making an entrance. After finishing my third year of me...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tess-timmes" rel="tag" > Tess Timmes < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Travel Ban Is Based on Executive Whim, Not Objective Criteria
ConclusionFor countries on the list, and for any country wishing to remain off the list, it is vitally important that they understand which factors led to their inclusion or exclusion. If the United States is acting in good faith —seeking to change behavior as opposed to looking for an excuse to ban people—its criteria should be clearly explained and understood. The Iran nuclear deal, for example, hasvery precise requirements for Iran to avoid sanctions, down to the exact percentage of purity for its enriched uranium. This is very far from the case here.No consistent combination of factors or mitigating factors...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

BMC “Research in Progress” photo competition: the winning images
Earlier this year we proudly announced that BioMed Central is becoming BMC. Firmly believing that our research communities share our enthusiasm for innovation, science and progress we launched our first ever “Research in progress” photography competition. We asked you to send us inspiring images reflecting curiosity, integrity and innovation across four categories: people at work, close-ups of equipment, plants and animals and microscopy, and you certainly didn’t disappoint. So without further ado, here is our winning image, the runner up and a selection of images that caught the eyes of our judging panel...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - September 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Open Access Source Type: blogs

Emergency Access Initiative activated for libraries affected by recent disasters
NLM and Publishers Launch Emergency Access Initiative, Granting Free Access to Books and Journals for Libraries Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Expanded to Include Hurricane Maria and the Earthquakes in Mexico The National Library of Medicine (NLM) activated the Emergency Access Initiative (EAI) on September 15th in response to Hurricanes Irma and Harvey which devastated Florida and several Caribbean islands, as well as parts of South Carolina, Texas, and Louisiana. On September 20th, NLM extended the area of coverage to include areas impacted by Hurricane Maria, and those in Mexico impacted by the r...
Source: BHIC - September 22, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Annette Parde-Maass Tags: Emergency Preparedness National Library of Medicine News disaster response EAI Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 075 with Little Medic Aidan Baron
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Government #FOAMed Warning; Life in the Fast Lane is apparently addictive. You have been warned. (It’s Jellybean 075 with Aidan Baron; @ALittleMedic ) Aidan Baron is not really that little when you meet him. He is quite big. If you do twitter you will have noticed this man before. I had doubts that he really existed. Was he something like Max Headroom or Ultron or Hobbs? No! He is a lovely man! He is a lovely man that has been enthusiastic about Para-medicine ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean aidan baron Source Type: blogs

Building Health Care Systems In Post-Earthquake, Post-Constitution Nepal
Nepal finds itself at a critical juncture in its history. On September 20, 2015 a new Constitution was brought into full force, crystallizing the coming of age of the world’s youngest democratic republic. Today, challenges abound in Nepal — recovery from the worst natural disaster in 80 years, a brutal border conflict with India, and entrenched poverty. And as a landlocked nation with limited options for exporting goods, Nepal continues to face economic stagnation. Yet the new Constitution brings us great hope. It is among the world’s most progressive, particularly when it comes to the provision of Univer...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - April 14, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Duncan Maru, SP Kalaunee and Shanta Bahadur Shrestha Tags: Costs and Spending Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Hospitals Organization and Delivery Payment Policy Population Health Public Health Quality ACOs EHRs Nepal Nepal Health System Strategy public-private partnership Source Type: blogs

The Making Of Nepal’s Immunization Law
Financial independence for Nepal’s immunization program is now within reach for the first time in history. On January 26, 2016, President Bidya Devi Bhandari of Nepal signed into law a long-awaited immunization bill. This law will improve oversight of immunization services, set tighter standards for vaccine testing and use, and perhaps most importantly, change the way Nepal finances its immunization program. Transitioning From Gavi Support Like many nations, Nepal currently depends on financial support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, to fund 60-70 percent of its vaccine purchases. Nepal’s Finance Minister has ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 7, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Devendra Gnawali Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Global Health Population Health Gavi Kathmandu Declaration Nepal Sustainable Immunization Financing Program vaccines Source Type: blogs

Four Centuries of Spring Temperatures in Nepal
In the past two decades, much scientific research has been conducted to examine the uniqueness (or non-uniqueness) of Earth’s current climate in an effort to discern whether or not rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are having any measurable impact. Recent work by Thapa et al. (2015) adds to the growing list of such studies with respect to temperature. According to this team of Nepalese and Indian researchers, the number of meteorological stations in Nepal are few (particularly in the mountain regions) and sparsely distributed across the country, making it “difficult to estimate the rate and geographic exten...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 28, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Craig D. Idso Source Type: blogs

OpenCon 2015 and open access in Nepal
How did you find OpenCon 2015?Pixabay The atmosphere was electric and the air was thick with love – love for openness and accessibility to knowledge. OpenCon, a conference where the global community unites to celebrate the achievements of openness, plan for the future and eulogize the importance and need for open entities to a range of audiences. I had a remarkable time at the OpenCon where I acquired an in depth knowledge about Open Access, Open Education and Open Data through esteemed keynote speakers, workshops, panel discussions and conference sessions. Open projects around the globe I had the opportunity to lear...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - December 11, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Roshan Kumar Karn Tags: Open Access open data Source Type: blogs

The High Costs Of Nepal’s Fee-For-Service Approach To Health Care
Go to just about any clinic, pharmacy, or hospital in Nepal with a head cold. Your symptoms are invariably caused by a virus, for which time is the only remedy, rather than antibiotics, steroids, or vitamins. Despite the substantial harms and lack of benefit of such medications, you will most likely receive them all. If you are feeling particularly unwell, you might also get intravenous fluids, perhaps some antacid medications, and certainly some amount of analgesics like paracetamol or diclofenac. You will emerge from your consultation 1,500 Nepalese rupees poorer, despite not having received anything of particular benefi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - July 20, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Duncan Maru and Senendra Uprety Tags: Costs and Spending Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Health Professionals Hospitals Organization and Delivery Payment Policy Population Health Public Health Quality Duncan Maru fee-for-service globalization Kathmand Source Type: blogs

A plastic surgeon goes to Nepal. What he found surprised him.
Sitting in a rickety jeep rumbling through treacherous mountainous terrain, on winding unpaved roads full of blind curves and teetering on the edge of cliffs recently ravaged by an earthquake, I began to question my decision to go along on this trip.  We were about 3 hours outside Kathmandu, Nepal heading to a small village along the banks of the Melamchi River.  The driver, who could not have been any older than my teenage son, reassured us that we were almost there.  It would be another hour before “there” became “here”! Our destination on this day was a school devastated by the rec...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 16, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

A physician survived the Nepal earthquake. Here’s what he learned.
The morning after his brother’s bachelor party, standing on the fourth floor of his family home, Dr. Arvind Goel, felt the ground move under his feet. “First it was minor vibrations and then it built up in a crescendo and then the couch where my four-month-old son was lying began to shake.” “It was creepy,” Goel, 32, continued. “The furniture began to shake, then the light fixtures fell from the wall and then they began to swing like a pendulum. The large screen TV was about to fall.” Goel, a practicing nephrologist, was in Katmandu, Nepal, last month for his younger brother’...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 18, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Emergency Source Type: blogs

Access, Excess, And Medical Transformation: Delivering Durable Health Care In Rural Nepal
Conclusion: On Impact And Scale We believe that Durable Healthcare can transform the health care industry away from the dominant fee-for-service paradigm and towards a model that incentivizes patient safety, patient-centeredness, and evidence-based medicine. Only then we will have a competitive marketplace of private sector providers who leverage public funds for the broader public good. (Source: Health Affairs Blog)
Source: Health Affairs Blog - May 21, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: Duncan Maru and Padam Chand Tags: Global Health Innovations in Care Delivery Organization and Delivery Population Health Public Health ACOs Durable Healthcare Organization EMR health technology Nepal health care Possible triple aim Source Type: blogs

Another Nepal Earthquake Makes Disaster Relief Planning Even More Important
Leadership, coordination, communication, and involvement of local stakeholders are critical in order to mount an informed response to natural disasters. Improved disaster management in Nepal could help limit the suffering of impacted communities and help secure a more successful recovery in the long run. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - May 13, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

Nepal Earthquake Response Shows Need for Better International Planning
The U.S. provided supplies after the earthquake in Nepal, but they piled up at points of delivery because Nepalese customs authorities insisted that standard inspections be followed, even in an emergency situation. These kinds of bureaucratic challenges can be more easily overcome if they are identified and addressed before crises arise. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - May 7, 2015 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

A Trek through Nepal
By Chris Stodard, MD, and Steve Tanner, MD   April 5: Today is the first day of camp and clinic. We started the day off with a lecture for the local health care workers, and then set our sights on taking care of patients. They were already lining up two hours before we opened our doors. The villagers have not had access to this type of health care for more than a year. The most rewarding experience we had today was with a patient who had a febrile seizure. The patient’s mother was panicking but felt much better and thanked us after we were done. Multiple patients had musculoskeletal complaints and upper respirat...
Source: Going Global - October 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Trek through Nepal
By Chris Stodard, MD, and Steve Tanner, MD   April 5: Today is the first day of camp and clinic. We started the day off with a lecture for the local health care workers, and then set our sights on taking care of patients. They were already lining up two hours before we opened our doors. The villagers have not had access to this type of health care for more than a year. The most rewarding experience we had today was with a patient who had a febrile seizure. The patient’s mother was panicking but felt much better and thanked us after we were done. Multiple patients had musculoskeletal complaints and upper respir...
Source: Going Global - October 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Help support acupuncture clinical skill building and vital healthcare in Nepal!
Founder’s note: Hey folks, this post is from a NCNM graduate who is going to be participating in the Acupuncture Relief Project in Nepal. She asked that I help her drum up funding for her endeavor – a very worthy cause. She’s going to be contributing some content about the project and her experience, starting with this post. Please give to her cause, if you can, and tell your friends!   Dear Chinese Medicine Central Readers, In early January 2015, I will leave my husband, two young children, a sweet German Shepherd and a cozy home. I will load a backpack aboard a flight in Portland, Oregon that will ...
Source: Deepest Health: Exploring Classical Chinese Medicine - August 13, 2014 Category: Alternative Medicine Practitioners Authors: Guest Author Tags: Community and Cultivation Foundational Science Source Type: blogs

An Amazing Experience in Nepal
By Heather Brown, MD     I had an amazing opportunity to spend a month working in the ED at Scheer Memorial Hospital in Banepa, Nepal, during my second year of residency. Scheer is a missionary hospital 30 kilometers outside Kathmandu with a six-bed emergency room open 24 hours a day. The ED was staffed with a mix of seasoned western physicians and young Nepali house staff who were mostly recent medical school graduates. There were plenty of chances to make a serious impact, and I was ready to do just that!   Arriving in Nepal I’ve been passionate about international medicine since I was in co...
Source: Going Global - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

An Amazing Experience in Nepal
By Heather Brown, MD     I had an amazing opportunity to spend a month working in the ED at Scheer Memorial Hospital in Banepa, Nepal, during my second year of residency. Scheer is a missionary hospital 30 kilometers outside Kathmandu with a six-bed emergency room open 24 hours a day. The ED was staffed with a mix of seasoned western physicians and young Nepali house staff who were mostly recent medical school graduates. There were plenty of chances to make a serious impact, and I was ready to do just that!   Arriving in Nepal I’ve been passionate about international medicine since I was in college, ...
Source: Going Global - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs