Bipolar & Substance Abuse Disorders: A Complex Diagnosis that Demands Integrated Medical & Psychological Care
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs

Methamphetamine (Meth): Just the Facts
Methamphetamine (meth) is a stimulant drug that can cause more serious problems than just "meth mouth".  Read  More » (Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog)
Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog - March 2, 2020 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Five profound ways physical exercise shapes your brain and mind
We’ve all heard that exercise is good for us—how it strengthens our hearts and lungs, and helps us prevent diseases like diabetes. That’s why so many of us like to make New Year’s resolutions to move more, knowing it will make us healthier and live longer. But many people don’t know about the other important benefits of exercise—how it can help us find happiness, hope, connection, and courage. Around the world, people who are physically active are happier and more satisfied with their lives. They have a stronger sense of purpose and experience more gratitude, love, and hope. They feel mo...
Source: SharpBrains - January 6, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness brain exercise Joy mind movement neurobiological neurochemistry neurological Physical-Exercise proprioception resilient well-being Source Type: blogs

How to Ask Your Doctor About Addiction Treatment
Learning more information about the addiction treatment process can be difficult if you do not know where to start looking. One of the many places individuals may begin their search is with their primary care provider, which makes it important to know how to ask your doctor about addiction treatment. There are many reasons an individual may seek addiction treatment advice from their doctor, including: The doctor is prescribing medications that they believe they have become addicted to The individual is suffering from a condition that they believe their addiction is worsening or impacting The individual doesn’t have...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 11, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources doctor doctors treatment center treatment facilities treatment facility treatment options treatment programs Source Type: blogs

Evidence Pours More Cold Water on The False Narrative That Prescriptions Caused the Opioid Crisis
Jeffrey A. SingerA new study reported in the November 1, 2019Annals of Emergency Medicine pours more  cold water on the false but persistent narrative that the opioid overdose crisis was caused by doctors prescribing opioids to patients in pain.This prospective cohort study by researchers in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine followed 484 “opioid naïve” patients prescribed opioids for acute pain upon release from the emergency department during a six month period. The statewide prescription drug monitoring program was employed in addition to regular f...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 20, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Bringing Drug Use Out of the Shadows Reduces Harm to the Community as Well as to Users
Jeffrey A. SingerMany critics of marijuana legalization raise concerns that marijuana dispensaries might serve as loci for  increased local criminal activity. Now there is empirical evidence that just the opposite occurs.A new study reported in the September issue of  Regional Science and Urban Economics examined local crime rate data from 2013 through 2016 in Denver, Colorado, where legal cannabis sales to adults began in 2014. The researchers reported:The results imply that an additional dispensary in a neighborhood leads to a reduction of 17 crimes per month per 10,000 residents, which corresponds to roug...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 19, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Response to Another "Epidemic" Is Likely to Generate Harmful Unintended Consequences--As Usual
Jeffrey A. SingerAfter addressing the “meth epidemic” with the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 (don’t look now, but meth-related deaths are at historic highs, eclipsing those solely from prescription opioids), and after addressing the opioid epidemic by depriving patients of pain medication while  driving nonmedical users to more dangerous drugs, it appears politicians, assisted by an eager press, are setting their sights on fixing the newest “epidemic:” the “growing epidemic of e-cigarette use in our children.”Secretary of Health and Human Serv...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Kratom: Fear-worthy foliage or beneficial botanical?
Depending on what you read, kratom is a dangerous, addictive drug with no medical utility and severe side effects, including overdose and death, or it is an accessible pathway out of undertreated chronic pain and opiate withdrawal. How can the US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), medical professionals, and millions of regular kratom users have such divergent views of the same plant? What is kratom? Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical tree from the coffee family native to Southeast Asia, with properties that range from stimulant-like, energizing and uplifting, to opiate-like, causing drowsiness and euphoria. Kratom has d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Pain Management Vitamins and supplements Source Type: blogs

Senator Portman Presumes To Know How Many Days Of Pain Relief All 328 Million Americans Need
With  clear evidence that restricting the number of prescriptions increased the death rate by driving non-medical users to heroin and fentanyl, the last thing one wants to hear about is a politician planning to double down on this deadly policy by calling for further prescription limits for patients in pain.Yet Senator Robert Portman (R-OH) is  proposing legislation that would impose a national 3-day limit on opioid prescriptions following surgeries. He will be kind enough to allow exceptions for people dealing with cancer, chronic pain, and “other serious matters”—whatever that means....
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 26, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Is an End in Sight to the Longest Running World War?
The War on Drugs is not only fought on the home front. In fact, it is the longest running world war. While  Portugal has decriminalized all drugs, Uruguay never criminalized personal drug use and possession, the Czech Republic has decriminalized possession of small amounts of illicit drugs, and Norway and Mexico contemplate decriminalizing all drugs, the world-wide war on drugs continues apace. And drug prohibition’s futility and destruction are on world-wide display.I have written about the  resurgence of methamphetamine use and methamphetamine related...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

No Evidence Migrant Families Are Aiding Drug Smuggling
ConclusionAlthough government officials latched onto the narrative that families were significantly benefiting drug smugglers, Customs and Border Protection initially denied any connection between the asylum seekers and drug smuggling when families first started coming in larger numbers in 2014. Customs and Border Protection spokesman Michael Frieltold theWashington Post in June 2014 that CBP has seen “no indication that drug interdiction operations have been negatively impacted by our efforts to process the influx” of migrants.How is it possible that Border Patrol is doing as good of a job at stopping drug smu...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Senators Manchin and Braun Are Attempting to Practice Medicine Without a License —And Fighting the Wrong War
Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Mike Braun (R-IN) are still trying to address the fentanyl and heroin overdose crisis —soon to be joined by a methamphetamine and cocaine overdose crisis—by denying chronic pain patients access to pain relief. They have just introduced a bill they call The FDA Opioid Labeling Accuracy Act,  which would “prohibit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from allowing opioids to be labeled for intended use of ‘around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment’ until a study can be completed on the long-term use of opioids.”Set aside the fact that most pain...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 12, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The War on Meth Is Back. Big Time
Today ’s Seattle Times reports on the surge in methamphetamine-related deaths, noting there are more meth-related deaths than at the height of the last “meth wave” in the early 2000s. The era of the American meth lab is over a decade gone, yet pure, cheap meth is back and bigger than ever in Western Washington. When Seattle residents point to needles proliferating on sidewalks, they usually say heroin ’s to blame; however, a bigger proportion of those needles in recent years is actually from people injecting meth, according to King County syringe exchange surveys.Death rates...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The Coming " Stimulant Crisis? "
Earlier this month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), reported that from 2015-2016 deaths from cocaine and psychostimulants (such as methamphetamine, Ritalin, dextroamphetamine) increased 52.4 percent and 33.3 percent respectively. In 2017, the CDC reported a  total  overdose rate of 70,237, and cocaine was involved in 19.8 percent of those deaths while other psychostimulants were involved in 14.7 percent. Opioids, primarily synthetic (fentanyl and fentanyl analogs), were found in 72.7 percent of the cocaine deaths and 50.4 percent ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 21, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

A Pretextual Traffic Stop Should Require Sufficient Pretext
Several years ago,Atlanticwriter Conor Friedersdorf asked Twitter“If you could add one Bill of Rights style amendment to the Constitution what would it be?” I responded “The Fourth Amendment and “we mean it.””My answer may have been tongue-in-cheek, but quite seriously, the Fourth Amendment and its protections have been eroded by the Supreme Court precedents over several decades. As a result, the power of the police to intrude upon the lives of individuals has grown and they have taken advantage of that power throughout the country.TheFourth Amendment reads:“The right of the people...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jonathan Blanks Source Type: blogs

Podcast: From Homeless to Prisoner to Olympian
 In his teens, Tony Hoffman was a BMX Amateur being featured on magazine covers. But soon after, he was a drug addict living in the streets and ultimately ending in prison. After his parole, a now clean Tony returned to the BMX world in a big way: by taking the silver medal in the 2016 Olympics. Since then, Tony has dedicated his life to helping others with addiction issues with his motivational speaking and special projects. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest After paroling prison on December 13, 2008, Tony Hoffman started living out his dream, with his addiction behind...
Source: World of Psychology - April 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Recovery Sports The Psych Central Show Addiction BMX Gabe Howard Olympics prison Tony Hoffman Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Podcast: From Homeless to Prisoner to Olympic Coach
 In his teens, Tony Hoffman was a BMX Amateur being featured on magazine covers. But soon after, he was a drug addict living in the streets and ultimately ending in prison. After his parole, a now clean Tony returned to the BMX world in a big way: by taking the silver medal in the 2016 UCI BMX World Championships. Since then, Tony has dedicated his life to helping others with addiction issues with his motivational speaking and special projects. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest After paroling prison on December 13, 2008, Tony Hoffman started living out his dream, with h...
Source: World of Psychology - April 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Recovery Sports The Psych Central Show Addiction BMX Gabe Howard Olympics prison Tony Hoffman Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

From " Meth Crisis " to " Opioid Crisis " to " Fentanyl and Meth Crisis " to...
Today ’s Wall Street Journal reports that, just as overdose deaths related to prescription pain relievers are showing signs of leveling off, officials worry that the surge in methamphetamine-related deaths is joining the surge in fentanyl-related deaths to fuel the total drug overdose rate. There were  1887 meth-related deaths reported in 2011. By 2017 more than 10,000 deaths were reported related to meth and other chemically-similar psychostimulants.The Drug Enforcement Administration has seen a 118 percent increase in meth seizures by law enforcement between 2010 and 2017. The met...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Crystal Meth Addiction
What is a Crystal Meth Addiction? Crystal meth is the name for the street drug crystal methamphetamine. Crystal meth can also be known as ice or glass, and it can be either snorted, smoked or dissolved and injected. It is a very strong and highly addictive drug. It affects the central nervous system, and crystal meth addiction has dangerous life-threatening effects. Understanding Crystal Meth Crystal meth is a man-made stimulant drug that has no legal use. It is made with methamphetamine, pseudoephedrine and a combination of other chemicals. Methamphetamine has been around for a long time, originally created to keep soldie...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 14, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Drug Treatment Methamphetamines Substance Abuse crystal methamphetamine meth addiction Source Type: blogs

The Unrecognized Lesson of " Meth Crisis 2.0 "
On February 21, Charles Fain Lehman wrote an important  column in the Wall Street Journal alerting the public to the alarming rise in methamphetamine-related deaths in recent years. This has been occurring under our noses while the press and lawmakers focus their attention on overdoses related to opioids. He correctly tells readers that the recrudescent meth crisis, which I like to call “Meth Crisis 2.0: The Mexican Connection,” came about after lawmakers addressed “Meth Crisis 1.0” in 2005 with the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act. That Act made it much harder for allergy sufferer...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 4, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Cocaine and Addiction
Is Cocaine Addictive? According to the Foundation for a Drug Free World, cocaine creates the greatest psychological dependence of any drug, next to methamphetamine. It stimulates key pleasure centers within the brain and causes extremely heightened euphoria. Cocaine addiction, tolerance and dependency builds quickly. If someone uses cocaine, they will not get the same effect as the very next time they do it with the same amount. Understanding Cocaine Cocaine is a white, powdery substance. It creates a high by reacting with the body’s central nervous system, releasing high amounts of dopamine. In turn, this creates en...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 4, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Cocaine Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Substance Abuse cocaine addiction coke drug addiction drug addiction recovery drug addiction treatment Source Type: blogs

New Cato Report: A Border Wall Won ’t Stop Drug Smuggling—Marijuana Legalization Has
President Trump has repeatedly cited drug smuggling as a reason to build a wall along the Southern border. Butmy new Cato policy analysis shows that, if stopping drug smuggling is the goal, a border wall is about the worst possible investment. Here are a few of the main findings:Hundreds of miles of border fences built from 2003 to 2009 had no effect on marijuana smuggling.Marijuana legalization starting in 2014 has cut marijuana smuggling between ports of entry (i.e. where a wall would go) 78 percent from 114 pounds per agent in 2013 to just 25 pounds per agent in 2018.  Since marijuana is the primary drug smuggled b...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Alcohol, Smoking, Drugs: Can Digital Solutions Give A Helping Hand To The Addicted?
Alcohol content measuring wristbands, smart lighters, nicotine tracking wearables, stop smoking apps, virtual reality therapies, automated messaging platforms are the newest elements in the arsenal of digital health technologies supporting everyone in the fight against addiction to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs. Addiction and dependency ruins lives Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life. It doesn’t matter whether it’s about cigarettes, alcohol, medication, drugs, gambling, sex, etc., any of these substances or phenomena could cause you strong dependency and might impact you...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Medical Professionals Patients Researchers alcohol cigarette digital health drugs health technology Innovation medication opioid opioid crisis smartphone smartphone apps smoking virtual Source Type: blogs

Today ’s Drug Abusers Did Not Derive From Yesterday’s Patients
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping thi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The Curse of Delusional Parasitosis
​Delusional parasitosis is a rare condition, but it is more common where methamphetamine and cocaine abuse is high. It is a fascinating condition to witness; patients are convinced that their skin is infested with foreign organisms or materials despite incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.This condition is known by numerous names—Ekbom syndrome, delusory parasitosis, psychogenic parasitosis, delusional parasitosis, delusional ectoparasitosis, formication, chronic tactile hallucinosis, dermatophobia, parasitophobia, and cocaine bugs—but delusional parasitosis and more recently delusional infestation are c...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - September 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Methamphetamine and pulmonary hypertension
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - September 19, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular pulmonary toxicology Source Type: blogs

Prohibition Is the Obvious Cause of Opioid Crisis as CDC Releases Preliminary Casualty Numbers for 2017
Earlier this month the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released  preliminary estimates of the opioid overdose rate for 2017. The total overdose rate rose to approximately 72,000, up from a total overdose rate of 63,600 in 2016, an increase of roughly 10 percent. The total overdose rate includes deaths from numerous drugs in addition to opioids, such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and benzodiazepines. The opioid-related overdose rate increased as well, from a little over 42,000 in 2016 to over 49,000 in 2017. This increase occurred despite a 4 percent drop in heroin overdoses and a 2 p...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

How to Be Kind
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog I seem to constantly skirt trouble. Writing and medicine are fractious bedfellows – a marriage not always congenial. On one hand, to write well, to truly produce good work, you have to crack yourself open and claw out the truth for examination in the light. No fluffing around, avoiding the difficult topics. No wilful blindness to your own biases. No doing stuff to be liked. No pretence. Writing about medicine, on the other, requires a good deal of restraint &nda...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle Johnston Tags: 'How to...' series. An Instruction manual for those in Critical Care How to Be Kind Source Type: blogs

Methamphetamine related heart failure: rising prevalence, distinct phenotype
(Source: Notes from Dr. RW)
Source: Notes from Dr. RW - June 15, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: cardiovascular toxicology Source Type: blogs

Tips for Teens fact sheets about drugs
SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration), Tips for Teens fact sheets provide information about the effects of short- and long-term use of cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and inhalants. These insightful and easy-to-read brochures provide important facts teens need to know, answer frequently asked questions, and help to dispel common myths about each of the substances covered. Recently these fact sheets have been updated and are now available to download or order for free. Tips for Teens:  The Truth About Cocaine Tips for Teens: The Truth About Heroin Tips for Teens: The Truth About Methamph...
Source: BHIC - June 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Carolyn Martin Tags: Children and Teens Health Information Literacy Substance Addiction and Misuse Source Type: blogs

Double Standards, Trojan Style
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD The University of Southern California (USC) appears to look the other way when male physicians harass or assault women. In reality, sexual violence spares no occupation, including medicine, but the way an organization responds to crime against women indicates a certain level of integrity. The World Health Organization estimates sexual violence affects one-third of all women worldwide. In a nation where women make up 50% or more of each incoming medical school class, only sixteen percent of medical school deans are female, making gender imbalance in leadership positions nearly impossible to overcome. Fo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: OP-ED Physicians #MeToo Sexual Assault USC Source Type: blogs

While Politicians Cut Opioid Prescriptions, Fentanyl —With Help From the “Dark Web” and the USPS— Becomes the Number One Killer
A May 22  story in Bloomberg News describes with painstaking detail the underground pipeline through which the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl floods the US market. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, while the Mexican cartel plays a role by using its well-established heroin and methamphetamine d istribution networks, most of the fentanyl comes in to the US from China. The raw materials to make the synthetic opioids are cheap and they can be manufactured rather quickly in small laboratories. The laboratories are constantly creating new variations so as to skirt restrictions the Chinese gover...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

From “Opioid Epidemic " to “Stimulant Epidemic”
Speaking at the National Rx Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, John Eadie, coordinator for the National Threat Initiative,  warned, “We’re now facing a very significant stimulant epidemic.” Abuse of prescription stimulants such as Adderal and Ritalin (used to treat Attention Deficit Disorders) as well as illicit stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamine, are surging. “No one is paying attention to this,” Eadie said, because the focus has been on opioids.Law enforcement has seized 15 kilograms of stimulants for every kilogram of heroin it has seized during the last 5 years. The Centers...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 6, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Lessons for the Opioid Epidemic from Meth
As the nation remains fixated on the opioid epidemic,methamphetamineismakingaresurgence. Meth is less expensive than heroin, and it isgaining users who fear opioid overdoses.Meth is not new; it burst onto the scene in the early 1990, as the crack epidemic waned.   Synthesized from readily available chemicals, meth provided a cheaper, homemade alternative to other drugs. As use increased, legislators and law enforcement officials took note.The first major legislation targeting meth was the1996Comprehensive MethamphetamineControl Act. Passed unanimously by the Senate and by 386-34 in the House, the legislation required ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron Source Type: blogs

The First Count of Fentanyl Deaths in 2016: Up 540% in Three Years - The New York Times
Drug overdoses killed roughly 64,000 people in the United States last year, according to the first governmental account of nationwide drug deaths to cover all of 2016. It's a staggering rise of more than 22 percent over the 52,404 drug deaths recorded the previous year — and even higher than The New York Times's estimatein June, which was based on earlier preliminary data.Drug overdoses are expected to remain the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, as synthetic opioids — primarily fentanyl and its analogues — continue to push the death count higher. Drug deaths involving fentanyl more t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 5, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Executive Functions in Health and Disease: New book to help integrate Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychology
__________ Neuroscience used to be the monopoly of a few elite universities located in a handful of countries. Neuropsychology used to be a quaint niche discipline relatively unconnected to the larger world of neuroscience and content in its methods with paper-and-pencil tests. Neuroscience itself was relatively unconcerned with higher-order cognition, and the very term “cognitive neuroscience” was often met with rolled eyes by scientists working in more established areas of brain research (a personal observation made in the 1980s and even 1990s on more than one occasion). And the ...
Source: SharpBrains - August 8, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Professional Development Alexander-Luria clinical psychologists cognition cognitive-psychologists disease Executive-Functions frontal-lobe medical neurologists neuropsychologists Neuropsyc Source Type: blogs

Does the public shaming of Carmen Puliafito go too far?
Recently, the Los Angeles Times broke a story that Dr. Puliafito, former Dean of the Keck School of Medicine of USC, had been abusing drugs and keeping company with a group of younger individuals who engaged in drug use and illicit activity.  Much of this activity occurred while he was dean, and it is a shocking story: A 66 year-old titan of the field of ophthalmology, renowned for inventing a device that revolutionized the field and forging both the 1st and 2nd ranked programs in the country (University of Miami’s Bascom-Palmer and previously USC’s Doheny before its split) found partyi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 1, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/vamsi-aribindi" rel="tag" > Vamsi Aribindi, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Huge ST Elevation in V2 and V3. What is it?
A 30-something presented with methamphetamine use and agitation. He was sedated, then had an ECG as part of his workup:He was stabilized and observed.He was still confused 8 hours later when I was now on duty, and he was found to have a heart rate of 140, so another ECG was recorded:There is one lead (V2) with massive ST elevation.Since there is very little STE in V1 or V3, there must be lead misplacement.I suspected some lead misplacement and ordered another with the leads corrected:Now there is massive STE in BOTH leads V2 and V3What do you think?What do you want to do?What do you think? This is what I thought:...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Fighting Depression: The Beast We Have in Common
Chapter OneLearned Optimism Thought #1:I am grateful for beautiful daughters who made my 50th birthday a memorable one.If you can’t take medication to combat depression or suicidal depression, how do you cope? Do you resign yourself to desolation, or do you fight back? Can you fight back? How ‽ This was the dilemma I faced years ago when anti-depressants had failed me and my life was worse off because of side-effects. What I learned in my battle against depression not only changed my life for the better, but helped me change other lives, too. Fighting off depression seems like hard wor k, but when you break down th...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - March 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD Depression Goodreads Source Type: blogs

How to Sedate the Violent Patient
​The emergency department can be an exciting yet sometimes violent place to work, often because of a patient presenting with excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), the most severe form of agitation. It is associated with the use of sympathomimetics such as methamphetamine, cocaine, and PCP.​Patients with ExDS present with sudden onset of aggressive and bizarre behavior. These patients generally demonstrate unexpected physical strength and hyperthermia. This disease process is extremely important for prehospital responders and emergency physicians to recognize because almost two-thirds of the patients with ExDS die at the sc...
Source: The Tox Cave - March 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Depression: The Beast We Have in Common
Learned Optimism Thought #1:I am grateful for beautiful daughters who made my 50th birthday a memorable one.If you can’t take medication to combat depression or suicidal depression, how do you cope? Do you resign yourself to desolation, or do you fight back? Can you fight back? How ‽ This was the dilemma I faced years ago when anti-depressants had failed me and my life was worse off because of side-effects. What I learned in my battle against depression not only changed my life for the better, but helped me change other lives, too. Fighting off depression seems like hard wor k, but when you break down the coping st...
Source: The Splintered Mind by Douglas Cootey - December 24, 2016 Category: Psychiatry Tags: ADHD Depression Goodreads Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 250
Welcome to the 250th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Prone ventilation has a myriad of potential beneficial effects in respiratory failure. So why not try it in patients who are not intubated but hypoxic? Great and thoughtful stuff from Josh Farkas. [SO] The Best of #FOAMed Emergency Medicine Core...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Drugs and Health Blog: Methamphetamine
Timely blog posts feature emerging trends and apply the science of drug abuse to real life. The teacher ’s guide features classroom activities and discussion questions for use with selected posts to encourage students to think critically about how drugs and drug abuse can affect them.Read  More » (Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog)
Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog - August 18, 2016 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

On the Fast Track: Three Ways Stimulants Negatively Change Your Life
It’s easy to see the relationship between drug abuse and deteriorating physical health. It’s not a total surprise when an alcoholic experiences liver failure or a meth addict’s teeth fall out; these drugs are known to damage the body if routinely used to excess. But how do these physical effects translate into the overall quality of life for an addict? Here are three ways stimulants in particular, like methamphetamines and cocaine, change the lives of people who frequently use them. Decisions get harder. Because addiction is a neurological disorder that puts the brain on a hamster wheel of drug seeking...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - July 27, 2016 Category: Addiction Authors: sheilas Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health drug treatment center prescription dr Source Type: blogs

Beta-Blockers for Cocaine and other Stimulant Toxicity
Dogma: “a belief or set of beliefs that is accepted by the members of a group without being questioned or doubted; a point of view or tenet put forth as authoritative without adequate grounds.” Years ago I treated a university student who presented to the emergency department (ED) after drinking several cans of a popular caffeinated energy drink to “pull an all-nighter” during final exam week. He was tremulous, agitated, and pale, with sinus tachycardia ranging from 140 to 160 bpm and normal blood pressure (BP). The house officer (registrar) working with me that night proposed treating him with a be...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 4, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John Richards Tags: Toxicology and Toxinology alpha stimulation amphetamines Beta Blockers cocaine dogma John Richards Stimulant Toxicity Stimulants Source Type: blogs

The Opioid Crisis: Nociception, Pain and Suffering
By MARTIN SAMUELS, MD In order to understand the concept of pain and its relationship to the current opioid crisis, it is prudent to review the neurology of pain an why it exists.  Several concepts are important to integrate. Nociception:  Nociception is the capacity to sense a potentially tissue damaging (noxious) stimulus.  To illustrate this one should place a forefinger in a glass of ice water and determine how long passes until an unpleasant sensation arises.  If one performs this experiment in a large group, one can recognize that, although the stimulus is the same (a glass of ice water), the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: THCB Source Type: blogs

Legalize Marijuana
There are as we know many unintended effects of prohibiting things that people want. Sure, it's often a balance. Whether we're talking about prostitution, methamphetamine, or 32 ounce sodas there are costs of both legalization and prohibition. It's more complicated than that because various prohibition and legalization regimes are possible. Evidence of the effects of one regime vs. another is generally largely lacking, so a lot of the debate consists of speculation and moral judgments disguised as factual claims.In the case of cannabis, however, I am fully convinced and I have been for a long time. What we know about alcoh...
Source: Stayin' Alive - June 10, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Doped
I’ll bet you pride yourself on living a pretty clean life. It’s doubtful that I’d stumble on you in some alley, track marks up your arms, lying in a puddle of your own urine, unconscious from a night of shooting up heroin, snorting coke, or smoking crack. And you probably have all or most of your teeth, unlike the toothless addicts on methamphetamine. Perhaps you even avoid or minimize your use of the softer recreational drugs in cigarettes and alcoholic beverages. You likely adhere to healthy practices and keep such indulgences to a minimum. The truth is that you’ve been doping it up for most of yo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - June 2, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle addiction addictive appetite Gliadin grains Inflammation opiates Source Type: blogs

2016 The Year of Pharmacy Enforcement
Conclusion The unfortunate thing is that in all four cases this was preventable.  In the Palisades, Nashville and CVI cases, the proper internal review and the establishment of SOPs, basic training, and monitoring were the need. In the case of MedIV, establishing a Quality Management System and following current Good Manufacturing Practices could have prevented needless tragedy. Over the years, pharmacy compliance programs have been sorely neglected. Pharmacies and pharmacists need to take compliance seriously and take the necessary steps to establish or reinforce their programs -- before the Government comes...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 19, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs