Captain Kidd's 'rediscovered' treasure really just lead and rubble, Unesco says
United Nations’ cultural body dismisses Maine archaeologist’s claim that he found the legendary pirate’s ship and a silver ingot near MadagascarUnesco has thrown cold water over an American explorer’s claims that he had discovered the sunken treasure of infamous 17th-century pirate William Kidd off the coast of Madagascar. Related: 'Captain Kidd's treasure' found off Madagascar Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2015 Category: Science Authors: AFP in Antananarivo Tags: Madagascar Piracy at sea Archaeology Africa Maine Science World news US news Source Type: news

Madagascar: Hospital Donated By Chinese Government Inaugurated in Madagascar
[Focac] Antananarivo -The hospital donated by the Chinese government was inaugurated by Madagascar's President Hery Rajaonarimampianina on Wednesday in Anosiala Ambohidratrimo, in the outskirts of the capital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 26, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tiny Dracula ants hunting underground in Madagascar and the Seychelles
Six new species of cryptic, subterranean ants from the genus Prionopelta have been described from the Malagasy region. The tiny underground dwellers are part of the larger group of the Dracula ants and are fierce, social predators that hunt down prey with dagger-like teeth. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 23, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

From Darwin to moramora ('take it easy'): Ten new subsocial spider species from Madagascar
A thorough research on nearly 400 Madagascan subsocial spider colonies adds to the unique biodiversity and endemism on the exotic island. Not only did the scientists find as many as ten new cobweb spider species, but they also gave them some very honorary and curious names. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

From Darwin to moramora ('take it easy'): Ten new subsocial spider species from Madagascar
(Pensoft Publishers) A thorough research on nearly 400 Madagascan subsocial spider colonies, conducted by Dr. Agnarsson's team, adds to the unique biodiversity and endemism on the exotic island. Not only did the scientists find as many as ten new cobweb spider species, but they also gave them some very honorary and curious names. The study was published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Despite Setbacks, Global Sanitation Makes Progress, Says Fund
An open drainage ditch in Ankorondrano-Andranomahery, Madagascar. Credit: Lova Rabary-Rakontondravony/IPSBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Jun 2 2015 (IPS)When the United Nations hosted a panel discussion last year urging its partners to “break their silence” on open defecation, Singapore’s deputy permanent representative Mark Neo was outspoken in his characterisation: “Open defecation is a euphemism. What we are talking about is shitting in the open.”And over one billion people worldwide do so every day.“This is a crucial step towards achieving better health, reducing poverty and ensuring e...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Water & Sanitation Women's Health Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) India open def Source Type: news

FISH-i Africa Is Proving That Coastal Countries Can Halt Large-Scale Illegal Fishing
Short FISH-i film (with narration) from commsinc on Vimeo. The Seychelles has been fighting illegal fishing for many years. The Western Indian Ocean is home to the world's second-largest tuna fishery, making it a hotspot for illegal fishing with an estimated one in four fish caught illegally. Illegal-fishing operators are able to profit off their illicit activities because they operate in flexible and quickly maneuverable networks that enable them to capitalize on the weaknesses in national and international systems. The Seychelles government is already actively engaged in various activities to stop illegal fishing in the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Biodiversity: Eleven new species come to light in Madagascar
Madagascar is home to extraordinary biodiversity, but in the past few decades, the island's forests and associated biodiversity have been under greater attack than ever. Rapid deforestation is affecting the biotopes of hundreds of species, including the panther chameleon, a species with spectacular intra-specific colour variation. A new study reveals that this charismatic reptilian species, which is only found in Madagascar, is actually composed of eleven different species. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 25, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Biodiversity: 11 new species come to light in Madagascar
(Université de Genève) Madagascar is home to extraordinary biodiversity, but in the past few decades, the island's forests and associated biodiversity have been under greater attack than ever. Rapid deforestation is affecting the biotopes of hundreds of species, including the panther chameleon, a species with spectacular intra-specific color variation. A new study by Michel Milinkovitch, professor of genetics, evolution, and biophysics at the University of Geneva, led in close collaboration with colleagues in Madagascar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 25, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Who left the dogs out? No trace of ancient colonizers' canines in Madagascar
Their migration spanned half the globe and their culture was spread across the Pacific and Indian Oceans; but in Madagascar, the ancient Indonesians left behind a mystery. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A bucketful of new Eugenia plant species from Madagascar
(Pensoft Publishers) The spigot for plant discoveries in Madagascar continues to flow steadily, with no signs of slowing down in the near future. Working with coauthors Martin Callmander and Pete Phillipson, Neil Snow recently described 17 new species of Eugenia in the Myrtle family in the journal PhytoKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Captain Kidd's Treasure May Have Been Found Off Madagascar
One of the most famous lost pirate treasures may have just been found. Explorers working off the coast of Madagascar have uncovered a giant silver ingot that they believe came from the wreck of the Adventure Galley, a ship used by the notorious 17th-century pirate Captain William Kidd. "There's more down there. I know the whole bottom of the cavity where I found the silver bar is filled with metal," marine archaeologist and treasure hunter Barry Clifford, who discovered the wreck, told the BBC. "It's too murky down there to see what metal, but my metal detector tells me there is metal on all sides."...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Captain Kidd's treasure' found off Madagascar
55kg bar of silver found in shallow waters off Saint Marie island may have belonged to notorious 17th-century Scottish pirate Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Elgot Tags: Madagascar Archaeology Africa Science World news Source Type: news

Urban Slums a Death Trap for Poor Children
Children on their way to school in Kibera, the largest slum in Nairobi. Credit: Save the ChildrenBy Valentina IeriUNITED NATIONS, May 5 2015 (IPS)It’s called the urban survival gap – fuelled by the growing inequality between rich and poor in both developing and developed countries – and it literally determines whether millions of infants will live or die before their fifth birthday.Save the Children’s annual report on the State of the World’s Mothers 2015 ranks 179 countries and concludes that that “for babies born in the big city, it’s the survival of the richest.”Speaking f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Valentina Ieri Tags: Active Citizens Africa Aid Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Food & Agriculture Gender Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Migration & Refugees Population Source Type: news

Can humans hibernate in space?
Researchers are studying the feasibility of astronauts mimicking animals to sleep their way to MarsWhat better way to pass a long stretch of time than by entering a deep sleep to shut down some bodily functions and conserve energy? Bears do it to get through cold winters. So do many smaller mammals, including squirrels and hedgehogs. Even thefat-tailed lemur (a primate cousin ofHomo sapiens), living in warm Madagascar, slows down for months when its food supply runs low. But for us humans, hibernation has been an unnecessary and impossible goal. Until now.Taking lessons from animal hibernators, scientists are using their t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 27, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Eric Niiler for the Washington Post Tags: Space Animal behaviour Neuroscience Medical research International Space Station Human biology Mars Nasa Source Type: news

Wasp identification made easy
The first contribution to a complete identification resource for wasps, bees and ants of Africa and Madagascar has been published. User-friendly identification keys to the families and genera of an agriculturally and economically important group of parasitoid wasps, including online interactive identification keys, are now freely available to a range of end-users such as ecologists and conservationists and the applied forestry and agricultural sectors. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Wasp identification made easy
(Pensoft Publishers) The first contribution to a complete identification resource for wasps, bees and ants of Africa and Madagascar has been published. User-friendly identification keys to the families and genera of an agriculturally and economically important group of parasitoid wasps, including online interactive identification keys, are now freely available to a range of end-users such as ecologists and conservationists and the applied forestry and agricultural sectors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 13, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Visit From a Science Rock Star
As thousands of festival-goers flock to Coachella over the next two weekends, rock stars are on many minds across the country. But here in San Francisco, I've been reflecting on a different kind of groupie-worthy icon -- the one and only E. O. Wilson, champion of conservation, father of sociobiology and distinguished lover of all things six-legged. Unlike sports or Hollywood, the profession of science does not have many rock stars, but Ed Wilson is one of the few notables in the geek world of science who undoubtedly deserve that label. A few weeks ago, I invited Ed to come visit us here at the California Academy of Scien...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

For ticks, researchers find lemur noses to be males only in Madagascar
Out of 295 ticks collected from the noses of lemurs in Madagascar, 100 percent of them were male. The chosen location may provide a convenient jump-off point for male ticks to switch hosts as the lemurs sniff each other. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lemur teeth help take a bite out of Madagascar's mysteries
Research on lemurs' geographic mobility may help direct future conservation efforts on Madagascar. For centuries, scientists have marveled at Madagascar's lemur species, whose origins are unique to Madagascar. Unfortunately, all large-bodied species of lemur (as well as other native fauna larger in size than a small dog) have gone extinct in the past 2,000 years, most likely due to hunting pressure and deforestation. Researchers believe that gaining a better understanding of how animal mobility has been affected by the loss of species and habitat will be beneficial to current and future conservation efforts on the island. ...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 25, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lemur teeth help take a bite out of Madagascar's mysteries
(University of Cincinnati) New UC research on lemurs' geographic mobility may help direct future conservation efforts on Madagascar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can mechanisms used during hibernation help animals colonize new habitats?
Heterothermy, the ability of some animals to lower their metabolism and body temperature, is traditionally seen as an effective adaptation to predictable seasonal bottlenecks of unproductive cold periods. A new review suggests that the use of heterothermy may have been used as a response to acute emergency situations in animals that colonized Madagascar. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Can mechanisms used during hibernation help animals colonize new habitats?
(Wiley) Heterothermy, the ability of some animals to lower their metabolism and body temperature, is traditionally seen as an effective adaptation to predictable seasonal bottlenecks of unproductive cold periods. A new review suggests that the use of heterothermy may have been used as a response to acute emergency situations in animals that colonized Madagascar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Crystal amaze: how a chameleon changes colour revealed
Altering the space between tiny crystals allows lizards to reflect a specific wavelength of light and camouflage themselves, study finds It is one of nature’s most spectacular displays and now scientists have shown how the chameleon changes colour.A study has found that the lizards possess a layer of skin cells that contain floating nanocrystals. The tiny crystals are roughly evenly spaced throughout the cell and this spacing determines the wavelength of light that the cells reflect. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin, science correspondent Tags: Animal behaviour Biology Science Evolution Wildlife Madagascar World news Africa Environment Switzerland Source Type: news

Is The Moon Hollow? And What Creatures Are Living Inside?
In 1998, images from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft revealed something startling from Phobos, the unusual large moon orbiting Mars. It appeared to be a very tall, 400-foot-high rectangular-shaped object jutting straight up and casting a long shadow on the surface of Phobos, as seen in the picture below. While most scientists feel this is just a natural rock outcropping of the moon, it still raises questions. "Even if we see something that we can't explain, to conclusively say what it is, is a very different thing," says Florida Institute of Technology astrophysicist Hakeem Oluseyi. "Suppose we fi...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar
The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic has now reached a biodiversity hotspot. Researchers are therefore proposing an emergency plan. This includes monitoring the spread of the pathogenic fungus, building amphibian breeding stations and developing probiotic treatments, say the scientists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic has now reached a biodiversity hotspot. Researchers from UFZ Leipzig and TU Braunschweig, together with international colleagues, are therefore proposing an emergency plan. This includes monitoring the spread of the pathogenic fungus, building amphibian breeding stations and developing probiotic treatments, say the scientists, writing in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This Week in Science: Martian Mystery, Rock-Hard Snail Teeth, and the Big Apple Underwater
Seven days, lots of science in the news. Here's our roundup of some of the week's most notable and quotable items: Illustration by Sarah Peavey Scientists think a mysterious plume seen above Mars might be a large cloud or an aurora--but neither of these explanations squares with what we think we know about the Martian upper atmosphere. Scientists now think sea snail teeth (not spider silk) are the strongest natural material. A red dwarf star passed through the edge of our solar system a mere 70,000 years ago. The tails on the wings of a luna moth may serve as decoys to divert the sonic tracking of predator...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Models predict where lemurs will go as climate warms
(Duke University) Climate change is likely to leave a lot of lemurs looking for new places to live on their island home of Madagascar. A Duke study predicts where lemurs are likely to seek refuge as temperatures rise between now and 2080. The researchers identified three areas on the island that will be particularly important for lemurs in the future, as well as key corridors that will allow lemurs to reach these areas from their current spots. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sambany has one stone tumour removed after walking for three days to seek help
EXCLUSIVE: The man, known only as Sambany, walked all the way across Madagascar to seek help. He said he felt 'dead inside' after the way he'd been treated during his life because of the growth. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Satellite Eye on Earth: January 2015 – in pictures
Double cyclones, Iceland’s Holuhraun lava field and Madagascar floods are among the images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last monthTwo tropical cyclones— Diamondra and Eunice—swirled over the central Indian Ocean, in January. Neither storm was particularly strong, nor were they expected to make landfall or cause significant damage. But their close proximity offered striking views to satellites.If two tropical cyclones draw near each other, they begin to rotate cyclonically around an axis connecting their centres – something meteorologists call the Fujiwhara effect. Such binar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Eric Hilaire Tags: Environment Space World news Science Source Type: news

Experts raise alarm as plague kills dozens in Madagascar
An outbreak of the plague has killed dozens in Madagascar, and experts fear those numbers could go up. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plague kills dozens in Madagascar
An outbreak of the plague has killed dozens in Madagascar, and experts fear those numbers could go up. At least 119 cases were confirmed by late last year, including 40 deaths, the World Health Organization said in a statement. And the disease is tak... (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - January 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plague cases rise in Madagascar, fear of more epidemics: WHO
GENEVA (Reuters) - Plague has killed 57 people out of 213 known cases in Madagascar and more deaths are feared after recent flooding forced tens of thousands of people from their homes and set rats on the run, the World Health Organization said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Over 28,000 endangered lemurs illegally kept as pets in Madagascar may threaten conservation, survival of species
An estimated 28,000 lemurs, the world's most endangered primates, have been illegally kept as pets in urban areas of Madagascar over the past three years, possibly threatening conservation efforts and hastening the extinction of some of lemur species. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Endangered Madagascar lemurs illegally kept as pets may threaten species conservation and survival
(Temple University) An estimated 28,000 lemurs, the world's most endangered primates, have been illegally kept as pets in urban areas of Madagascar over the past three years, possibly threatening conservation efforts and hastening the extinction of some of lemur species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Tanzania: Playing Down Extent of Aids Devastation 'In Favour' of Outbreaks
[Daily News]DESPITE recent proliferation of diseases like the Ebola virus in West Africa, the plague in Madagascar, the dengue fever in Tanzania and other parts of the world, HIV/AIDS still remains a great threat to mankind. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - December 16, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Madagascar: UN Health Agency Warns of 'Rapid' Spread of Plague in Capital
[UN News]The United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) has warned of a "rapid" spread of the plague in the capital of Madagascar, where health authorities have reported 119 cases of the bacterial disease, including at least 40 deaths in the island nation. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 25, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Madagascar: UN health agency warns of ‘rapid’ spread of plague in capital city
The United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) has warned of a “rapid” spread of the plague in the capital of Madagascar, where health authorities have reported 119 cases of the bacterial disease, including at least 40 deaths in the island nation. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - November 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: Nation Hit by Deadly Plague
[WHO]On 4 November 2014, WHO was notified by the Ministry of Health of Madagascar of an outbreak of plague. The first case, a male from Soamahatamana village in the district of Tsiroanomandidy, was identified on 31 August. The patient died on 3 September. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 22, 2014 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Plague in Madagascar has killed 40 people out of 119 cases: WHO
GENEVA (Reuters) - An outbreak of the plague has killed 40 people out of 119 confirmed cases in Madagascar since late August and there is a risk of the disease spreading rapidly in the capital, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Plague in Madagascar has killed 40 people out of 119 cases -WHO
GENEVA (Reuters) - An outbreak of the plague has killed 40 people out of 119 confirmed cases in Madagascar since late August and there is a risk of the disease spreading rapidly in the capital, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Plague in Madagascar has killed 40 people out of 119 cases: WHO
GENEVA (Reuters) - An outbreak of the plague has killed 40 people out of 119 confirmed cases in Madagascar since late August and there is a risk of the disease spreading rapidly in the capital, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
On 4 November 2014, WHO was notified by the Ministry of Health of Madagascar of an outbreak of plague. The first case, a male from Soamahatamana village in the district of Tsiroanomandidy, was identified on 31 August. The patient died on 3 September. As of 16 November, a total of 119 cases of plague have been confirmed, including 40 deaths. Only 2% of reported cases are of the pneumonic form. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - November 21, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Disease outbreak news [doctype], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

Can humans hibernate in space?
Researchers are studying the feasibility of astronauts mimicking animals to sleep their way to MarsWhat better way to pass a long stretch of time than by entering a deep sleep to shut down some bodily functions and conserve energy? Bears do it to get through cold winters. So do many smaller mammals, including squirrels and hedgehogs. Even the fat-tailed lemur (a primate cousin of Homo sapiens), living in warm Madagascar, slows down for months when its food supply runs low. But for us humans, hibernation has been an unnecessary and impossible goal. Until now.Taking lessons from animal hibernators, scientists are using their...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Eric Niiler for the Washington Post Tags: Space Animal behaviour Neuroscience Medical research International Space Station Human biology Mars Nasa Source Type: news

South Sudan: Polio Cases Confirmed in South Sudan - WHO
[Sudan Tribune]Juba -The World Health Organization (WHO) said it confirmed unrelated cases of polio in South Sudan and Madagascar, attributing it to low vaccination coverage. (Source: AllAfrica News: Polio)
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - November 17, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Rare Vaccine-Derived Polio Discovered in 2 Countries
Cases of paralysis caused by mutating polio vaccine have been found in South Sudan and Madagascar, the World Health Organization said Friday. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 15, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Poliomyelitis Pakistan Madagascar South Sudan Afghanistan Vaccination and Immunization World Health Organization Source Type: news

Poliovirus in South Sudan and Madagascar
In separate and unrelated events, circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have been confirmed in South Sudan and Madagascar. In South Sudan, 2 cases due to cVDPV type 2 (cVDPV2) have been confirmed. The strains were isolated from 2 acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases in Unity state, with onset of paralysis on 9 September and 12 September 2014, respectively. In Unity state, as many as 33% of children remain under-immunized against poliovirus. Both cases are from an internally-displaced persons camp in Unity state. Unity state has been affected by civil unrest, leading to population displacements and declining vac...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - November 14, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: poliomyelitis [subject], polio, poliovirus, polio encephalitis, African Region [region], Disease outbreak news [doctype] Source Type: news

A new species of nocturnal gecko from northern Madagascar
(Pensoft Publishers) Hidden away in the tropical darkness of nocturnal Madagascar, scientists have discovered a new species of gecko which has been described in the open access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 10, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news