Alison Jolly obituary
Primatologist and conservationist famous for her work on the lemurs of MadagascarAs a postdoctoral student at Yale University in the early 60s, Alison Jolly pioneered in-depth field research on the behaviour and ecology of lemurs in Madagascar. Her life subsequently took her to Cambridge University, the New York Zoological Society, and the universities of Cambridge, Princeton, Rockefeller and Sussex. Throughout these travels, her abiding interest in big questions to which small lemurs might provide answers never wavered and, over the years, her insights transformed our understanding of the evolution of social behaviour.A s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Alison Richard Tags: theguardian.com Obituaries Madagascar Primatology Conservation Environment Science Source Type: news

Surveys find that despite economic challenges Malagasy fishers support fishing regulations
(Wildlife Conservation Society) Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and other groups have found that the fishing villages of Madagascar -- a country with little history of natural resource regulation -- are generally supportive of fishing regulations, an encouraging finding that bodes well for sustainable strategies needed to reduce poverty in the island nation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Madagascar sells first forest carbon credits to Microsoft
The Government of Madagascar has approved carbon sales with Microsoft and its carbon offset partner, The CarbonNeutral Company, and Zoo Zurich. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 12, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

New strains of the Black Death could emerge
Conclusion This study improves the understanding of the family tree of the plague-causing bacteria Yersinia pestis. It indicated the first plague pandemic was caused by a strain of Y. pestis distinct from the histories of all modern strains of the bacteria, and of the bacteria that caused two subsequent plague pandemics. This type of genetic evidence is persuasive so the conclusions are likely to be reliable. There are two main interpretations of the results. First, the bacteria that caused the Plague of Justinian came into existence then died out. Second, the bacteria strain that caused the Plague of Justinian remains in ...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Source Type: news

Global Health: No Longer Leading Killer, Plague Still Raises Fears
History tells us that the Plague of Justinian and the Black Death each took a large fraction of the earth’s population. Science tells us that the plague is still out there.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - January 28, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Madagascar Bubonic Plague Source Type: news

Madagascar: Procurement Irregularities and Over-Pricing in Madagascar Identified By OIG
[GFO]Suppliers alleged to have colluded on bids (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - January 8, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Madagascar battles locust swarms to save rice and maize crops
This article appeared in Guardian Weekly, which incorporates material from Le MondeMadagascarAfricaFood securityInsectsPesticidesFarmingAgricultureSébastien Hervieutheguardian.com © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 31, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Sébastien Hervieu Tags: Farming Food security World news Society Madagascar Features Pesticides Insects Guardian Weekly Global development Environment Africa Agriculture Source Type: news

Madagascar: Plague in Madagascar
[IRIN]Antandrohomby -The bubonic plague season arrived in Madagascar earlier than usual in 2013, and with it an apparently greater prevalence of a more deadly strain of the disease. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 20, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New Hope for an Endangered Fish in Madagascar
A lucky break leads to the rediscovery of a wild population of an imperiled species (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 19, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

UN agency seeks further funding for Madagascar locust control plan
A locust control programme launched in Madagascar is making progress against an invasion of the voracious insects that is threatening rice and maize crops but requires an additional $17 million for the next two phases, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said today. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - December 19, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: Plague Claims More Than 30 Lives
[allAfrica]An outbreak of plague more vicious than the bubonic strain called the Black Death has killed 39 people in Madagascar, the government said, according to an AFP report. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 13, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

CU-Boulder-led team finds first evidence of primates regularly sleeping in caves
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Scientists have discovered that some ring-tailed lemurs in Madagascar regularly retire to limestone chambers for their nightly snoozes, the first evidence of the consistent, daily use of the same caves and crevices for sleeping among the world's wild primates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

From a watery grave to flesh-eating bugs
After spotting an unexpected beetle, the taxonomist Kipling Will found himself fighting for his life• Read about more scientists who go to extremes lengthsI've done fieldwork on every continent except Antarctica. My area of research at the University of Berkeley, California, is the taxonomy and systematics of beetles, while I also investigate the evolution of chemical defence. We go out and locate a certain species of beetle, normally by scrambling around in the depths of a jungle, then record aspects about their habitat and life history and extract genetic material to do a DNA analysis.Many taxonomists study hard to ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 1, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Josh Davis Tags: Biology Taxonomy Technology Features The Observer Science Source Type: news

Top 10 irreplaceable nature reserves on Earth - in pictures
The most irreplaceable nature reserves on Earth have been identified by an international team of scientists, based on the large numbers of threatened animals and birds they harbour. They range from a misty mountain refuge for nature in Colombia, to the rainforests of Madagascar, the elephant-rich hills of western India and the wet tropics of Queensland, AustraliaDamian Carrington (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 14, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Tags: theguardian.com Biodiversity Endangered species Endangered habitats Animals Plants Editorial Environment Wildlife Source Type: news

Using Social Media to Empower Madagascar’s Youth - 28 October 2013
ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — On the island nation of Madagascar, more than half of the population is under 20 years old and over one in three girls becomes pregnant before her 18th birthday. But talking about sex remains taboo, which makes Manantsoa Ratsarazaka’s accomplishment all the more remarkable. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - November 10, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: Volunteers Hope Kids' Book Helps Fight Malaria in Madagascar
[State Department]Washington -Peace Corps volunteers Raegan and Patrick Spencer of Sterrett, Alabama, hope storytelling will be an effective way to teach schoolchildren in Madagascar about disease prevention and the causes and dangers of malaria. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - November 8, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using Social Media to Empower Madagascar’s Youth - 28 October 2013
ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — On the island nation of Madagascar, more than half of the population is under 20 years old and over one in three girls becomes pregnant before her 18th birthday. But talking about sex remains taboo, which makes Manantsoa Ratsarazaka’s accomplishment all the more remarkable. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - November 6, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: concerned by rising food insecurity, UN agency calls for more funding
Citing efforts to curb the food crisis in Madagascar sparked by erratic weather and a locust invasion, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today stressed the urgency of bridging a $25 million funding gap for the country. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - October 25, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bubonic plague outbreak feared in Madagascar
Health experts and authorities on Indian Ocean island launch campaign to clean up rat-infested jails to halt spread of 'black death'Madagascar is at risk of a major outbreak of bubonic plague unless it can clean up its rat-infested jails, health experts have warned.The Indian Ocean island became the most severely affected country in the world last year, with 256 cases and 60 fatalities from the disease known as the "black death" when it swept through Europe in the 14th century.The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Malagasy prison authorities have launched a campaign against rodents in Antani...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2013 Category: Science Authors: David Smith Tags: theguardian.com World news Infectious diseases Madagascar Africa Source Type: news

Madagascar bubonic plague warning
Madagascar faces a bubonic plague epidemic unless it slows the spread of the disease, aid groups warn. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Four million people food insecure in Madagascar after reduced harvest - UN agencies
Some four million people in rural Madagascar are food insecure after rice and maize production took a bad hit this year from erratic weather and a locust invasion, two United Nations agencies said today. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - October 9, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New to nature no 111: Typhleotris mararybe
A species of cave fish discovered in Madagascar commemorates the fever caught by the people who discovered itMost of the 150 or so types of cave fish pale in comparison to a newly discovered species from an isolated karst sinkhole in south-western Madagascar. Fish living in perpetual darkness typically share a syndrome of convergent features, including the loss of eyes and pigmentation accompanied by enhanced non-visual sensory structures on the head. The new species, Typhleotris mararybe, is small, about 38mm, and combines dark pigmentation with an absence of eyes and well-developed sensory canals and pores on its head. I...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Quentin Wheeler Tags: World news Features Animals The Observer Zoology Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Research suggests Madagascar no longer an evolutionary hotspot
(University of Rochester) Madagascar has long been known as a hotspot of biodiversity. Although it represents only one percent of the earth's area, it is home to about three percent of all animal and plant species on the planet. But research suggests the island's heyday of species development may be all but over. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 9, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Solitary lemurs avoid danger with a little help from the neighbours
An endangered species of Madagascan lemur uses the alarm calls of birds and other lemurs to warn it of the presence of predators, a new study by researchers from the University of Bristol and Bristol Zoo with the University of Torino has found. This is the first time this phenomenon has been observed in a solitary and nocturnal lemur species. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 5, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: news_text Tags: Press releases Source Type: news

Solitary lemurs avoid danger with a little help from the neighbors
(University of Bristol) An endangered species of Madagascan lemur uses the alarm calls of birds and other lemurs to warn it of the presence of predators, a new study by researchers from the University of Bristol and Bristol Zoo with the University of Torino has found. This is the first time this phenomenon has been observed in a solitary and nocturnal lemur species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 5, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UN agency appeals for urgent funds to control locust plague threatening Madagascar
The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today urgently appealed for $22 million to tackle the locust plague that has already infested over half of Madagascar's cultivated land and pastures and threatens to trigger a severe food crisis in the island nation. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - June 26, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Uganda Flood Response: Part 1
This blog post is written by Stephen Hagerich, a British Red Cross worker who has been working in Uganda. The American Red Cross is building their support for cash in emergencies and are developing some Emergency Response Unit roster members to become specialists and work on programs alongside other Red Cross/Red Crescent Societies. The Uganda Red Cross is continuing their response to flooding and landslides and decided to use cash grants to those affected. The role was to provide support to the Uganda Red Cross and document the process to share the learning for future programmes in other locations. Hiking through the fie...
Source: Red Cross Chat - June 25, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Jana Sweeny Tags: International Source Type: news

Madagascar: Fears of a Malaria Relapse in Madagascar
[IRIN]Antananarivo -Madagascar's recent gains in the battle against malaria are likely to be reversed because funding problems have interrupted prevention activities. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - June 9, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Overcoming Fistula in Madagascar - 20 May 2013
MAHAJANGA, Madagascar  — Every day, 10 women die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth in Madagascar. Many more survive, but  suffer from untreated complications of pregnancy, including the most debilitating injury of childbearing, obstetric fistulas. Although the condition was not recognized in the country until recently, it is estimated that 2,000 Malagasy women develop fistula each year. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - May 30, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New to nature special: the top 10 new species
From a snail-eating snake to a harp-shaped sponge… Quentin Wheeler on whittling down 18,000 new species to 10 favouritesOn 23 May,the International Institute for Species Exploration announced the annual top 10 new species for the sixth time. A committee of taxon experts led by Dr Antonio Valdecasas of the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales in Madrid made the final selections. The list is a kind of scientific shock-and-awe campaign, shocking us at what we did not know about our own planet and leaving us in awe over the diversity, complexity, wonder and beauty of the living world. From new species of black-staining ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Quentin Wheeler Tags: World news Features Animals The Observer Zoology Environment Science Wildlife Source Type: news

New Books Party: books received this week | @GrrlScientist
This week, I tell you about these books: The World's Rarest Birds by Erik Hirschfeld, Andy Swash and Robert Still; The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett; The Uses of Pessimism & the Danger of False Hope by Roger Scruton; A Cupboard Full of Coats by Yvvette Edwards; and The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley.Below the jump, I mention the books that I received recently in the mail or purchased somewhere. These are the books that I may review in more depth later, either here or in print somewhere in the world. When I get new books, I like to share them with people. Unfor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2013 Category: Science Authors: GrrlScientist Tags: Blogposts guardian.co.uk Science Source Type: news

British woman nearly died after tapeworms burrowed into her BRAIN while she was volunteering in Madagascar
Sherry Fuller, 40, from Westcliff, Essex, started to suffer from headaches and seizures when she returned from doing charity work in Madagascar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Primate hibernation more common than previously thought
(Duke University) Until recently, the only primate known to hibernate as a survival strategy was a creature called the western fat-tailed dwarf lemur, a tropical tree-dweller from the African island of Madagascar. But it turns out this hibernating lemur isn't alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: Food Insecurity Opens Door to TB
[IRIN]Toliara -Health experts fear the interruption of food assistance in Madagascar is increasing incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in Toliara, the capital city of Madagascar's southern Atsimo-Andrefana region. (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - May 1, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Introducing the 'lonely small bandit': new species of dinosaur discovered in Madagascar
A new species of dinosaur whose translated name means “lonely small bandit” has been discovered in Madagascar.     (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - April 19, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

New species of dinosaur discovered in Madagascar
A new species of dinosaur whose translated name means “lonely small bandit” has been discovered in Madagascar.     (Source: The Independent - Science)
Source: The Independent - Science - April 19, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Synthetic anti-malaria compound is bad news for artemisia farmers | Jim Thomas
Artemisinin breakthrough by synthetic biologists threatens to open new front in battle between microbes and peopleIn the constant fight between microbes and people, attempts to rein in the malarial parasite have just taken an interesting turn. On Thursday the founder of Amyris Biotech triumphantly announced production of 70m doses of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin. This sounds like good news for poor people but may be a step backwards – the start of a new hi-tech assault on farmers.There is no doubt that artemisinin is important. Artemisinin combination therapies are the World Health Organisation's drug of ch...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 12, 2013 Category: Science Tags: Blogposts Farming Malaria Infectious diseases Pharmaceuticals industry guardian.co.uk Vaccines and immunisation Global development Environment Business Science Source Type: news

Scientists May Have Uncovered Ancient Microcontinent
Scientists believe a long-lost land mass, sandwiched between the land masses that make up today's India and Madagascar, was lost on the sea tens of millions of years ago.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

India's rice revolution: Chinese scientist questions claim of massive harvests
Top scientist scoffs at claims that fewer seeds plus less water can lead to better rice crop resultsChina's leading rice scientist has questioned India's claims of a world record harvest, following a report in last week's Observer of astonishing yields achieved by farmers growing the crop in the state of Bihar.Professor Yuan Longping, known as the "father of rice", said he doubted whether the Indian government had properly verified young Indian farmer Sumant Kumar's claim that he had produced 22.4 tonnes of rice from one hectare of land in Bihar in 2011.Yuan, director-general of the national rice research centre ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 23, 2013 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: India World news Food & drink Life and style The Observer Food science Sustainable development Environment Agriculture Source Type: news

India's rice revolution: Chinese scientist questions massive harvests
Revelations in last week's Observer Food Monthly have created controversy over the truth of record yieldsChina's leading rice scientist has questioned India's claims of a world record harvest, following a report in last week's Observer of astonishing yields achieved by farmers growing the crop in the state of Bihar.Professor Yuan Longping, known as the "father of rice", said he doubted whether the Indian government had properly verified young Indian farmer Sumant Kumar's claim that he had produced 22.4 tonnes of rice from one hectare of land in Bihar in 2011.Yuan, director-general of China's national rice researc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 23, 2013 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: India World news Food & drink Life and style The Observer Food science Sustainable development Environment Agriculture Source Type: news

India's rice revolution
In a village in India's poorest state, Bihar, farmers are growing world record amounts of rice – with no GM, and no herbicide. Is this one solution to world food shortages?Sumant Kumar was overjoyed when he harvested his rice last year. There had been good rains in his village of Darveshpura in north-east India and he knew he could improve on the four or five tonnes per hectare that he usually managed. But every stalk he cut on his paddy field near the bank of the Sakri river seemed to weigh heavier than usual, every grain of rice was bigger and when his crop was weighed on the old village scales, even Kumar was shoc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2013 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: India Food security World news & drink Environmental sustainability Features Life and style The Observer Food science Sustainable development Global development Agriculture Source Type: news

India's rice revolution – audio slideshow
A ground-breaking method of cultivation, developed in Madagascar, is boosting rice yields and changing lives for farmers in IndiaJim PowellJohn Vidal (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Jim Powell, John Vidal Tags: India Food security Observer Food Monthly Editorial Global development Agriculture Source Type: news

The discovery of a new genus of crustacean and 5 new species
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) On recent expeditions to Madagascar and the French Polynesia, two Spanish researchers have discovered five new species of crustacean and a new genus named Triodonthea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parasites of Madagascar's lemurs expanding with climate change
Rising temperatures and shifting rainfall patterns in Madagascar could fuel the spread of lemur parasites and the diseases they carry. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 23, 2013 Category: Science Source Type: news

Parasites of Madagascar's lemurs expanding with climate change
(Duke University) Rising temperatures and shifting rainfall patterns in Madagascar could fuel the spread of lemur parasites and the diseases they carry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Madagascar: Navigating Roll-Out of Pneumonia Vaccines
[IRIN]Ampasimanjeva -Even after days on an antibiotic regime, three-month-old Jean Marie Anselme struggles to breathe and eat at the Fondation Médical d'Ampasimanjeva, a hospital in Vatovavy-Fitovinany Region, in southeastern Madagascar. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 22, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New to nature No 97: Ferrisia uzinuri
Pinpointing new species of mealy bug is of huge benefit to the agricultural industries of afflicted nations worldwideMealy bugs are small, soft-bodied scale insects that attach themselves to plants where they feed on fluids, weakening or damaging the host and sometimes transmitting disease. Their common name derives from dense cottony wax secretions with which they enrobe their body. Sexual dimorphism is extreme in mealybugs with "wasp-like" winged males that lack functional mouthparts and live only days, just long enough to mate, and flightless females that are largely sedentary once they attach to a host plant....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 20, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Quentin Wheeler Tags: Farming World news Features Animals The Observer Zoology Environment Agriculture Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Fritz Vollrath: "Who wouldn't want to study spiders?'
Fritz Vollrath's pioneering studies of spider's silk promise to deliver huge medical benefits in everything from knee replacements to heart transplantsUp on the roof of Professor Fritz Vollrath's lab in the zoology department at Oxford University, there is a makeshift greenhouse in which he nurtures his favourite golden orb web spiders. Walking into the greenhouse is a little like finding yourself inside one of those Damien Hirst vitrines that dramatise fast-forward life and death. The air is frenzied with the buzz of flies and thick with the smell of rotting fruit; look up and dozens of the mature African spiders, three i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Biology Health Technology Features Education The Observer Zoology Biochemistry and molecular biology Science Source Type: news