WHO provides 1.2 million antibiotics to fight plague in Madagascar
(Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Madagascar [country], Press release [doctype] Source Type: news

‘ Black Death ’ outbreak strikes Madagascar, killing 30 and triggering panic
Some might consider the plague a thing of the past, buried deep in medieval history. But it thrives in Madagascar, where the disease is a seasonal worry.  And this year, the country is experiencing what may be its deadliest outbreak in years: About 194 people are suspected to have fallen ill from the plague since August, and 30 […]Related:A mother refused to follow a court order to vaccinate her son. Now she’s going to jail.Doctors thought a woman had cancer — but it was just a reaction to an old tattooWhy do people give blood after disasters, but not during blood drives? (Source: Was...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The plague is 'alive and well' in Madagascar and spreading fast, warn public health officials
A deadly outbreak of the plague is spreading across Madagascar, a country that already had the highest number of cases in the world of a disease long forgotten about in the West. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/World Source Type: news

Madagascar experiencing rapid spread of disease known as the Black Death in Middle Ages
A deadly outbreak of the plague is spreading across Madagascar, a country that already had the highest number of cases in the world of a disease long forgotten about in the West. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/World Source Type: news

Dozens dead as plague outbreak menaces Madagascar
An unusually widespread outbreak of the plague is occurring in Madagascar, leaving at least 24 dead and scores infected across the country. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meet Madagascar's oldest animal lineage, a whirligig beetle with 206-million-year-old origins
(University of Kansas) A new study in Scientific Reports suggests the Malagasy striped whirligig beetle Heterogyrus milloti boasts a genetic pedigree stretching back to the late Triassic period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Madagascar: Highly Contagious Plague in Madagascar Kills Dozens
[Deutsche Welle] Madagascar is struggling to contain an outbreak of plague in several cities. Over 20 people have died. Plague can be treated when diagnosed early, says WHO Madagascar country representative Charlotte Ndiaye. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 3, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Plague in Madagascar hits urban areas, kills 2 dozen people
Authorities in Madagascar are struggling to contain an outbreak of plague that has killed two-dozen people since last month (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
From 23 August to 30 September 2017, a total of 73 suspected, probable, and confirmed cases of pneumonic plague, including 17 deaths have been reported in Madagascar. The diagnosis was confirmed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar by polymerase chain reaction test or using rapid diagnostic test. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - October 2, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Plague Outbreak in Madagascar Kills 20 - WHO Plague Outbreak in Madagascar Kills 20 - WHO
An outbreak of plague has killed 20 people in the space of a month in Madagascar, with a further 84 infected, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Madagascar: Plague Spreading Rapidly in the Country
[VOA] The World Health Organization warns a highly infectious, deadly form of pneumonic plague is spreading rapidly in Madagascar and quick action is needed to stop it. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 2, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

UN steps up aid to plague-hit Madagascar after 21 deaths
The U.N. health agency says it is stepping up its response to an outbreak of plague in Madagascar that has claimed 21 lives so far (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

WHO scales up response to plague in Madagascar
(Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - October 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Madagascar [country], Press release [doctype] Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
On 23 August 2017, a 31-year-old male from Tamatave, visiting Ankazobe District in central highlands, developed malaria-like symptoms. On 27 August, he developed respiratory symptoms during his journey in a shared public taxi from Ankazobe District to Tamatave (via Antananarivo). His condition worsened and he died. His body was prepared for a funeral at the nearest hospital, Moramanga District Hospital, without safety procedures. Additionally, 31 people who came into contact with this case either through direct contact with the primary case or had other epidemiological links, became ill, and four cases of them died. (Sourc...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - September 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Philanthropists Join Forces to Fund Africa ’s Cash-Strapped Health Sector
Tristate Heart and Vascular Centre in Nigeria. Credit: Tristate Heart and Vascular CentreBy Pavithra Rao, Africa Renewal*NEW YORK, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)In the 2017 World Happiness Report by Gallup, African countries score poorly. Of the 150 countries on the list, the Central African Republic, Tanzania and Burundi rank as the unhappiest countries in the world. Some of the factors driving unhappiness are the poor state of the continent’s health care systems, the persistence of HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the growth of lifestyle diseases such as hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.Few African countries make...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Pavithra Rao Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

The 14 Best Road Trips to Take in the Fall
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire Trageser / Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Madagascar: Five Die As Pneumonic Plague Re-Emerges in Madagascar
[East African] At least five people have died of pneumonic plague in Madagascar, public health officials said Friday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 15, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Once-abundant ash tree and antelope species face extinction -- IUCN Red List
(International Union for Conservation of Nature) North America's most widespread and valuable ash tree species are on the brink of extinction due to an invasive beetle decimating their populations, while the loss of wilderness areas and poaching are contributing to the declining numbers of five African antelope species, according to the latest update of the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. Today's IUCN Red List update also reveals a dramatic decline of grasshoppers and millipedes endemic to Madagascar, and the extinction of the Christmas Island Pipistrelle bat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Erratic Weather Threatens Livelihood Of Rice Farmers In Madagascar
Climate change is complicating the lives of subsistence rice farmers in Madagascar. For years, the wet and dry seasons arrived predictably. No more. To survive, farmers are looking to diversify.(Image credit: Samantha Reinders for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jason Beaubien Source Type: news

Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatened
(Florida Museum of Natural History) When trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos raises a herpetological mystery: If they have armor, why do they discard it? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Jump for joy: researchers make huge leap in understanding frog evolution
A new analysis using an unprecedented dataset reveals that major changes in frog diversity are linked to mass extinctionsAlthough Kermit the Frog has always struggled withbody image, in evolutionary terms, the frog body plan is a rather successful one. With a short, stout body, protruding eyes and strong, flexible limbs with webbed feet, the world can be your swamp. The frog body plan has remained rather similar for almost 200m years, and with only limited tweaks in anatomy, frogs (Anura) have managed to occupy a range of different habitats, frommuddy pools in Alaska to tree tops in the tropics. Currently, over 6700 specie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Animals Fossils Biology Science Evolution Source Type: news

Scientists Discovered a Giant Crocodile With T-Rex Teeth That ’s Straight Out of Your Nightmares
A giant crocodile with teeth like a T-Rex was a top predator during the Jurassic period, researchers found in a recent study. Called Razanandrongobe sakalavae and nicknamed “Razana,” the animal roamed Madagascar about 170 million years ago, according to the study published in PeerJ. Researchers first described the crocodile ancestor based on isolated teeth and a fragmented bone documented in a 2006 study. At the time, scientists could not determine whether Razana was a dinosaur or an unknown crocodile ancestor. New cranial fossils enabled a team of Italian paleontologists to identify Razana as a crocodile relat...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs fossils onetime Source Type: news

Gigantic crocodile with T. rex teeth was a top land predator of the Jurassic in Madagascar
(PeerJ) Little is known about the origin and early evolution of the Notosuchia, hitherto unknown in the Jurassic period. New research on fossils from Madagascar begin to fill the gap in a million-year-long ghost lineage. Deep and massive jaw bones armed with enormous serrated teeth that are similar in size and shape to those of a T. rex strongly suggest that these animals fed also on hard tissue such as bone and tendon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

End of the lab rat? Scientists want to use MOUSE LEMURS
Researchers from Stanford University Medical Centre have started conducting detailed physiologic and genetic studies on hundreds of mouse lemurs in the rainforests of Madagascar (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plant hunters discovered 1,700 new species last year
From a Turkish parsnip to Madagascar coffee beans and roses in China, the discoveries offer the prospect of better crops, medicinal uses and new garden displaysFrom new parsnips and herbs to begonias and roses, the world ’s plant hunters discovered more than 1,700 new species last year, offering the prospect of better crops and new colours and scents in the garden.TheState of the World ’s Plants report, led by scientists at the Royal Botanical Garden Kew in the UK and published on Thursday, reveals a cornucopia of new plants and assesses the risk to the plant world from pests and invasive species.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biology Science Conservation Biodiversity Environment Kew Gardens World news Source Type: news

New types of coffee, parsnips and roses among 1,700 plants discovered last year
From a new variety of Turkish parsnip to Madagascar coffee beans, the discoveries offer the prospect of better crops, medicinal uses and new garden displaysFrom new parsnips and herbs to begonias and roses, the world ’s plant hunters discovered more than 1,700 new species last year, offering the prospect of better crops and new colours and scents in the garden.TheState of the World ’s Plants report, led by scientists at the Royal Botanical Garden Kew in the UK and published on Thursday, reveals a cornucopia of new plants and assesses the risk to the plant world from pests and invasive species.Continue reading.....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biology Science Conservation Biodiversity Environment Kew Gardens World news Source Type: news

California Rescuers Use Surf-Leash Tourniquet To Help Shark Attack Victim
Quick-thinking California beachgoers used a surfboard leash as a tourniquet to stem massive bleeding after a shark attacked a woman wading in the ocean in northern San Diego country on Saturday evening, the Orange County Register reports. “All of the back of her leg was kind of missing,” one of the rescuers, 29-year-old Thomas Williams, told the outlet. “If she didn’t receive immediate care, it was life-threatening.” After bystanders carried the woman from the water on a surfboard over slippery rock, Williams, who had passed an EMT training test, and others tended to her. She was lat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tiffany & Co. Foundation grant to create knowlege-hub on colored gemstones
(University of Delaware) A new grant from The Tiffany& Co. Foundation will enable the University of Delaware's Saleem Ali to create a knowledge-hub on colored gemstones, including signature projects in Madagascar and South Asia focused on miner education and health and safety outreach. The $350,000 grant will also be used to target critical research necessary to surmount challenges facing individuals involved in colored gemstone mining and manufacturing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Collective poisoning from sea turtle consumption in Mahajanga Madagascar, May 2014 - Rasamimanana NG, Andrianirina ZZ, Razafilalaina FM, Rakotozanany LM, Andriamalala NC, Andrianarimanana D, Tiandaza DO, Raveloson NE.
The objective of this study was to describe its epidemiologi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Woman dubbed 'the monster' because of a huge tumour
Mariette, who asked to be known only by her first name, from Madagascar, was often shunned and kept away from children as a result of her growth. She finally had it removed in October 2014. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why the world needs zoos
The ongoing extinction crises shows that zoos are needed - even for common speciesI have written before aboutthe importance of zoos and the role they have to play in the world for conservation and education. They are in particularly important for endangered species – many animals are critically endangered in the wild and may go extinct there soon but are going strong in zoos. Many others are already extinct in the wild and only survive because of populations kept going in captivity. Even those critical of zoos often recognise this role and that it is better to have species preserved somewhere than be lost for all tim...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dr Dave Hone Tags: Zoos Science Animals Source Type: news

People Who Live Without Screens Don't Sleep Any Better Than The Rest Of Us
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People Who Live Without Screens Don't Sleep Any Better Than The Rest Of Us
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

People far from urban lights, bright screens still skimp on sleep
Screen time before bed can mess with your sleep. But people without TV and laptops skimp on sleep too, researchers say. A study of people living without electricity or artificial light in a remote farming village in Madagascar finds they get shorter, poorer sleep than people in the US or Europe. But they seem to make up for lost shuteye with a more regular sleep routine, the researchers report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

People far from urban lights, bright screens still skimp on sleep
(Duke University) Screen time before bed can mess with your sleep. But people without TV and laptops skimp on sleep too, researchers say. A Duke University study of people living without electricity or artificial light in a remote farming village in Madagascar finds they get shorter, poorer sleep than people in the US or Europe. But they seem to make up for lost shuteye with a more regular sleep routine, the researchers report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Another Cockroach Gets Stuck In Someone's Head (Ew!)
If something happens once, it’s a fluke. Twice, it’s a coincidence, but three times is a trend. And getting a cockroach stuck in your head is always unpleasant. Always always always. Doctors in Chengdu, China, had to remove a roach from the ear of a 60-year-old man Friday. The bug crawled miles into his ear on Feb. 1 and made itself very much at home, despite the man’s best efforts at removing it by sticking toothpicks and tweezers in his ear canal, according to The South China Morning Post. After three days, the frustrated man managed to kill the roach by spraying pesticide into his ear. But the bug was ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fish-scale gecko in Madagascar evades predators by getting naked
Talk about escaping by the skin of your teeth! Scientists have discovered a new type of gecko — an evasive little lizard who can escape predators’ grip not just by dropping its tail, but by shedding the scales on its skin.The new species Geckolepis megalepis,described in the journal PeerJ, has... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Found: A Lost Continent! (Really)
You’d think it would be hard to misplace an entire continent, what with the mountains and trees and all that other hard-to-miss stuff. Now, however, it seems that one of Earth’s continents indeed went missing. The good news is, it’s at last been found, lying below the waters of the Indian Ocean, beneath the tiny, 790 sq. mi. (2,040 sq. km) island of Mauritius. Mauritius long drew the attention of geologists and other scientists because of one curious feature: it’s strong gravitational pull. Earth’s gravity is not completely uniform at all places across the globe, but can be slightly stronger o...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - February 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Atlantis geology Gondwanaland lost continent minerals onetime Science zircon Source Type: news

Scientists Warn of ‘Eleventh Hour’ for Many Primate Species
Nearly two-thirds of primate species face the threat of extinction largely as a result of human actions that kill animals directly and destroy habitats, according to a new review from more than 30 leading primatologists. Researchers behind the paper, published in the journal Science Advances, called for urgent action to prevent mass extinction. Measures would vary between regions but include protections for primate habitats and actions to combat illegal poaching. “Primate conservation is not yet a lost cause,” the researchers write in the paper. “We have one last opportunity to greatly reduce or even elim...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals Source Type: news

MIA transport protein no longer missing in action
Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how valuable anti-cancer compounds are produced in the Madagascar Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 13, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

MIA transport protein no longer missing in action
(John Innes Centre) John Innes Centre scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how valuable anti-cancer compounds are produced in the Madagascar Periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

India was by no means as isolated as we thought
(University of Bonn) India gradually drifted away from Africa and Madagascar towards the north and collided with the Eurasian plate. Scientists assumed for a long time that the subcontinent was largely isolated during its long journey through the ocean. However, paleontologists at the University of Bonn are now showing using tiny midges encased in amber that there must have been a connection between the apparently cut off India and Europe and Asia around 54 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
On 6 December 2016, the Ministry of Health (MoH) in Madagascar alerted WHO of a suspected plague outbreak in Befotaka district, Atsimo Atsinanana region in the south-eastern part of the country. The district is outside the area known to be endemic area in Madagascar. No plague cases have been reported in this area since 1950. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - January 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

This Map Reveals Where Your Purchases Hurt Endangered Species the Most
Purchasing most consumer goods—from furniture to cell phones—inevitably takes a toll on the environment and harms endangered species. But understanding exactly which regions were most affected has been a guessing game. Now, new research published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution identifies global hot spots that goods exported to the United States, China, Japan and the European Union harm the most. U.S. consumption particularly threatened land species from parts of Southeast Asia and Madagascar, as well as southern Europe, the Sahel region of Africa, coastal Mexico, Central America and Central Asia....
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized animals Environment onetime Source Type: news

Humpback habitats off Madagascar revealed as energy exploration ramps up
(New England Aquarium) How humpback whales use marine habitats off the eastern coast of Africa is only partially understood, and that has become a conservation concern as offshore energy exploration expands in the region. However, a new study published in Marine Ecology Progress Series found that humpback whales that were satellite tagged off the coast of Madagascar during peak breeding season are traveling much further in the southwest Indian Ocean than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Madagascar: PM Calls for Support to Deal With Chronic Malnutrition
[WFP] The COHA study is a project led by the African Union Commission and the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), developed with the support of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) and the World Food Programme (WFP). The findings highlight the extent of social and economic losses caused by child malnutrition in a given country. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 21, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ring-tailed lemurs: Going, going, gone?
The ring-tailed lemur, a primate that is emblematic of the wild and wonderful creatures inhabiting the tropical island of Madagascar, is in big trouble -- there less than 2,500 left in wild, says new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ring-tailed lemurs: Going, going, gone?
(University of Colorado at Boulder) The ring-tailed lemur, a primate that is emblematic of the wild and wonderful creatures inhabiting the tropical island of Madagascar, is in big trouble -- there less than 2,500 left in wild, says new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Victoria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Madagascar: Halting pig-transmitted tapeworm
WHO works with Madagascar's Ministry of Health to implement a large-scale intervention against pig-transmitted tapeworm, Taenia solium. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: neglected tropical disease [subject], neglected tropical disease [subject], tropical disease [subject], tropical disease [subject], tropical disease [subject], African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

What's up with Madagascar?
The island of Madagascar off the coast of Africa was largely unexplored seismically until recently. The first broadband seismic images of the island help solve a longstanding mystery: why are there volcanoes far from any tectonic boundary? (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news