Madagascar:HIV-TB Connection - Key to Ending Infections
[IPS] London -A group of teenage boys huddle around Michelle in the mangroves behind Joyce Bay, a spot frequented by men who have sex with men (MSM) in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG). (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Medicinal Millipedes
Certain lemurs in the forests of Madagascar eat millipedes to protect themselves from parasitic infections of the gut. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 31, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Madagascar's lemurs use millipedes for their tummy troubles
(Springer) Madagascar's red-fronted lemurs may have a secret weapon from nature's medicine cabinet: millipedes. This is according to a study led by Louise Peckre of the German Primate Center at the Leibniz Institute for Primate Research in Germany. Peckre and her colleagues believe that lemurs chew on millipedes to treat and prevent conditions such as itching or weight loss which are caused by parasites that might live in and around their guts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

HIV-TB Connection: Key to Ending Infections
Michelle, a transgender peer educator, walks through her village in Joyce Bay, Port Moresby. Credit: Tom MaguireBy Tom MaguireLONDON, Jul 24 2018 (IPS)A group of teenage boys huddle around Michelle in the mangroves behind Joyce Bay, a spot frequented by men who have sex with men (MSM) in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG). She asks them how regularly they have sex and whether they have been tested for HIV or tuberculosis (TB). Her questions are met with giggles, intrigue and confusion. It turned out that none of the eight present have been tested for either disease. Michelle is a peer educator working to test key populat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tom Maguire Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

"Air-con" clothes? Scientists develop cooling fabric inspired by the comet moth
(Natural News) Silkworms may have a new competitor when it comes to producing refreshingly cool and bright-looking silk fabrics. The fibers spun by wild Madagascar comet moths look much more vivid and feel much cooler on the skin. An article in Newswise reports that research engineers have created artificial materials based on these fibers to replicate... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some of the world's poorest people are bearing the costs of tropical forest conservation
(PeerJ) Researchers from Bangor University in the UK and the University of Antananarivo in Madagascar show that new conservation restrictions in Madagascar bring very significant costs to local people (representing up to 85 percent of local annual incomes). The researchers estimate that 27,000 people have been negatively impacted by the conservation project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Science - July 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

Loss of lemurs might endanger many of Madagascar's largest tree species
(Rice University) Widespread logging and hunting have endangered virtually all of Madagascar's 100-plus species of iconic lemurs, and a new study by Rice University ecologists illustrates how saving the animals may also be key to saving the island's largest trees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 2, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lemurs can smell weakness in each other
(Duke University) Some people watch the competition carefully for the slightest signs of weakness. Lemurs, on the other hand, just give them a sniff. These primates from Madagascar can tell that a fellow lemur is weaker just by the natural scents they leave behind, finds a study on ring-tailed lemurs led by Duke University researchers. The study reveals that getting hurt dampens a lemur's natural aroma, and that males act more aggressively toward scents that smell " off. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New wasps named after Crocodile Dundee and Toblerone amongst 17 new genera and 29 species
(Pensoft Publishers) A total of 17 new genera and 29 new species of parasitoid wasps are described from across all tropical regions of the world. Amongst the novel taxa, there are three genera named after the action comedy 'Crocodile Dundee', the chocolate brand 'Toblerone', and the Madagascar spiny forests. In addition, five species are named after institutions holding some of the largest wasp collections. The findings are published in the open access Journal of Hymenoptera Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Boy Contracted the First Case of Bubonic Plague Idaho Has Seen in 26 Years
A boy in Idaho has contracted the first case of bubonic plague the state has seen for 26 years, according to health officials. The child, who remains unidentified, was treated with antibiotics in the hospital and is now recovering at home in a stable condition. The Central District Health Department, which announced the news of the bubonic plague’s return, said it was unclear whether the boy had contracted the disease in Idaho or on a recent trip to Oregon. Health officials said ground squirrels near the child’s home in Elmore County, Idaho, had tested positive for carrying the disease in 2015 and 2016, though ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized idaho onetime Source Type: news

Missing enzymes in the biosynthesis of the anticancer drug vinblastine in Madagascar periwinkle
Vinblastine, a potent anticancer drug, is produced by Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) in small quantities, and heterologous reconstitution of vinblastine biosynthesis could provide an additional source of this drug. However, the chemistry underlying vinblastine synthesis makes identification of the biosynthetic genes challenging. Here we identify the two missing enzymes necessary for vinblastine biosynthesis in this plant: an oxidase and a reductase that isomerize stemmadenine acetate into dihydroprecondylocarpine acetate, which is then deacetoxylated and cyclized to either catharanthine or tabersonine via two ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Caputi, L., Franke, J., Farrow, S. C., Chung, K., Payne, R. M. E., Nguyen, T.-D., Dang, T.-T. T., Soares Teto Carqueijeiro, I., Koudounas, K., Duge de Bernonville, T., Ameyaw, B., Jones, D. M., Vieira, I. J. C., Courdavault, V., OConnor, S. E. Tags: Biochemistry, Botany reports Source Type: news

Tiny spiders, big color
(Harvard University) There's plenty that's striking about Phoroncidia rubroargentea, a species of spider native to Madagascar, starting with their size -- at just three millimeters, they're barely larger than a few grains of salt. But the reason they caught Sarah Kariko's eye had to do with their color. Unlike many other species, which gradually see their color leach away when preserved in ethanol, the tiny spiders dazzled with brilliant, shimmering red and silver, even after decades in ethanol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recipe to Save 700,000 Young Children a Year: Clean Water & Decent Toilets
This study adds to the evidence that the lives of hundreds of thousands of young children could be saved each year if these pillars of development were combined with other health interventions.WaterAid and Defeat DD are calling on governments and donors to align child health and water, sanitation and hygiene programmes, policies and financing to address this unnecessary health crisis more effectively and more efficiently. These investments create a positive cycle that builds human capital, strengthens economies, reduces future healthcare costs and contributes to national development.This July the UN’s Sustainable Dev...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Savio Carvalho Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Unlocking the secrets of a cancer-fighting flower
The Madagascar periwinkle produces a chemical that has long been used against cancer. Until now, no one knew how, making production slow and expensive. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Milestone research on Madagascar periwinkle uncovers pathway to cancer-fighting drugs
(John Innes Centre) Plant scientists have taken the crucial last steps in a 60-year quest to unravel the complex chemistry of Madagascar periwinkle in a breakthrough that opens up the potential for rapid synthesis of cancer-fighting compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Half of All Wildlife Could Disappear from the Amazon, Galapagos and Madagascar Due to Climate Change
As much as half of wildlife and 60% of plants in the world’s richest forests could be at risk of extinction in the next century if stronger efforts aren’t taken to combat climate change, according to a new report on the risks of rising global temperatures. The landmark study was conducted by the World Wildlife Fund, University of East Anglia, and the James Cook University, and published on Tuesday in the journal Climatic Change. It warns that rising temperatures and associated phenomena, including extreme storms, erratic rainfall patterns, and prolonged droughts, could have disastrous effects on some of the wor...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

Insecticide-laced mosquito netting has become widely used in fishing, releasing toxins into aquatic environments
(Natural News) From Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea, to Madagascar, the populations of developing countries are turning insecticide-laced mosquito nets into makeshift fishing nets. A new study warned that this practice could have major repercussions for the environment, reported a Mongabay article. The study was inspired by the African experiences of lead author Rebecca Short. A researcher with the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High incidence of neonatal infections in Madagascar
(Institut Pasteur) Every year in the world, 4 million children die before the age of one, mainly in resource-limited countries, one-third of them due to a severe infection. In 2012, the Institut Pasteur and Institut Pasteur de Madagascar initiated the BIRDY program1 with the aim of documenting neonatal infections in the community and assessing the state of antibiotic resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 26, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Madagascar:President Hery Must Avoid the Worst Plague of All
[ISS] Madagascar's President Hery Rajaonarimampianina must be feeling rather like a pharaoh of the Old Testament. During the past four years when he has governed the country it has been visited by an astonishing succession of plagues. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 9, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

A spider that hunts other spiders: 18 new species of this bizarre Madagascar arachnid are unveiled
Scientists have identified 18 new species of pelcian spider. Also called assassin spiders, these critters hunt other arachnids using their long fang-tipped "jaws" to impale their prey. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Plague fears in Madagascar return
Health chiefs thought they had the 'crisis', which prompted 10 nearby African countries to be placed on high alert, under control. But panic has re-emerged after a suspected new case. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO Director-General: invest in health to end plague in Madagascar
The Director-General of WHO has outlined his vision for a Madagascar free of plague epidemics during a three-day visit to the island nation that started on 7 January 2018. "Madagascar can make plague epidemics a thing of the past through strategic investments in its health system – including better access to healthcare, improving preparedness, surveillance and response capabilities, and implementing the International Health Regulations," said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. (Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - January 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Madagascar [country], Press release [doctype] Source Type: news

A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testing
(Missouri Botanical Garden) Missouri Botanical Garden researchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera, which was thought to be extinct. The methods and results were published in Oryx. The authors include Garden researchers in both St. Louis and Madagascar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in Madagascar
(PLOS) The peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. 4, 2018, in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Madagascar:Govt Signs Big Financing Agreement to Boost Food and Nutritional Security
[IFAD] Rome -A new financial agreement, signed today between the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and Madagascar, will sustainably improve incomes and food and nutrition security for 320,000 Malagasy rural households in eight regions located in the southern part of the country. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 14, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

‘A different dimension of loss’: inside the great insect die-off
Scientists have identified 2 million species of living things. No one knows how many more are out there, and tens of thousands may be vanishing before we have even had a chance to encounter them. By Jacob MikanowskiThe Earth is ridiculously, burstingly full of life. Four billion years after the appearance of the first microbes, 400m years after the emergence of the first life on land, 200,000 years after humans arrived on this planet, 5,000 years (give or take) after God bid Noah to gather to himself two of every creeping thing, and 200 years after we started to systematically categorise all the wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jacob Mikanowski Tags: Invertebrates Taxonomy Insects Animals Wildlife Environment Extinct wildlife Science Biology Source Type: news

How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopes
(University of Cincinnati) A study by the University of Cincinnati found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Encounters with plague: tracing and preventing illness
In Madagascar, where a severe plague epidemic has unfolded since August 2017, the number of new infections is finally in decline. WHO is supporting health authorities to respond to the outbreak, from setting up specialized plague treatment units in health centres, to distributing medicines across the country. A particularly effective action has involved training teams to find people who have been in contact with a pneumonic plague patient – a system known as "contact tracing" – to help ensure these contacts are protected from falling sick themselves. Rakoto,* a 17-year-old man from Antananarivo, began...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

Global risk of Madagascar's pneumonic plague epidemic is limited
(Hokkaido University) Mathematical models have proven the risk of the on-going pneumonic plague epidemic in Madagascar spreading elsewhere in the world is limited, with the estimated number of exported cases staying below 0.1 person in each country between Aug. 1 and Oct. 17. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 30, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing—Dean and Faculty on Domestic Violence
Hopkins Nursing—Dean and Faculty on Domestic Violence body,#bodyTable,#bodyCell{ height:100% !important; margin:0; padding:0; width:100% !important; } table{ border-collapse:collapse; } img,a img{ border:0; outline:none; text-decoration:none; } h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6{ margin:0; padding:0; } p{ margin:1em 0; padding:0; } a{ word-wrap:break-word; } .mcnPreviewText{ display:none !important; } .ReadMsgBody{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass{ width:100%; } .ExternalClass,.ExternalClass p,.ExternalClass span,.ExternalClass font,.ExternalClass ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - November 30, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Madagascar ’s plague epidemic is slowing, but we must sustain the response
Madagascar ’s unprecedented outbreak of pneumonic plague is slowing down but the response must be sustained, WHO cautioned on Monday (November 27). “The worst of the outbreak is over, but we must stand ready to detect and respond to new infections until the end of the plague season in April 2018,” said WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. (Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - November 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
Disease Outbreak News Plague Madagascar (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - November 27, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Madagascar plague may have been in Europe years before
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Germany, found Yersina pestis bacteria first entered Europe in the Bronze Age, not the historical Black Death pandemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Madagascar plague death toll rises to 195 according to WHO
Some 2,267 people have been struck down by the 'medieval disease' in Madagascar, which is a rise of 64 casualties since the 2,203 cases reported on Friday. Ten countries are on 'high alert'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rwanda:Govt Making Progress in Reduction of Undernourishment - FAO Report
[New Times] Few countries in sub-Saharan Africa, notably Rwanda, Zimbabwe and Madagascar, reduced undernourishment while several others experienced a rise between 2009-2011 and 2014-2016, the Food and Agriculture Organisation regional overview of food security and nutrition report, 2017 shows. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 21, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Plague epidemic in Madagascar will trigger polio
EXCLUSIVE Dr Derek Gatherer from Lancaster University fears aid workers will so focused on the 'medieval disease' they will forget nationwide efforts to prevent polio cases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Black Death plague warning: Madagascar disease ‘impossible’ to eradicate, scientist claims
BLACK death plague cannot be eradicated, an expert has warned, after an outbreak of the disease has infected more than 2,000 people in Madagascar, since August. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plague patients escape because they are afraid of needles
Security guards at The Central Anti-Plague Hospital Ambohimindra in Madagascar have been stopping patients from running away after at least one escaped in October. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'It's not possible to eradicate plague', scientists warn
Professor Allen Cheng, an infectious disease expert at Monash University, warned this year's outbreak in Madagascar has been 'unusual' - because of it being airborne. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Madagascar:Plague Outbreak - Where Does It Still Exist and Could It Spread?
[The Conversation Africa] An outbreak of plague has been occurring in Madagascar, with more than 2,000 cases and 170 deaths reported since August 2017. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 17, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Madagascar plague death toll rises to 171
World Health Organization data also shows the 'medieval disease' has infected 2,119 in the country off the coast of Africa, with scientists worried it has reached 'crisis' point. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Madagascar's healthcare will be unable with the plague
EXCLUSIVE Madagascar's healthcare system will be unable to cope if the deadly plague outbreak continues to spiral out of control, a scientist has warned. Scores of doctors have been struck down. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plague – Madagascar
Plague Madagascar DON (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - November 15, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Rapid Risk Assessment: Outbreak of Pneumonic Plague in Madagascar: Recent Introduction in the Seychelles
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 10/13/2017 This 10-page report assesses the likelihood of spread of the outbreak of plague in Madagascar to other countries, in particular neighboring countries, including the European Union (EU) Outermost Regions and EU Overseas Countries and Territories. It discusses the risk for EU citizens residing in or traveling to the affected areas in Madagascar; for travelers to the Seychelles or other countries with imported cases from Madagascar; and related to a case of pneumonic plague in an aircraft or ship arriving from an affected area. (PDF) (Source: Disas...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists sound alarm as PLAGUE mutation could become resistant to all known conventional medicine
(Natural News) Although it might sound like a disease of yesteryear to many Americans, plague is not uncommon in Madagascar. However, this year’s outbreak, which has already killed nearly 170 people there, is markedly different from the strain that usually emerges in the country, and it has some experts seriously concerned about what’s in store.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly plague epidemic in Madagascar is similar to Ebola
EXCLUSIVE: Dr Derek Gatherer, from Lancaster University, revealed the plague could escalate in the same way as the haemorrhagic fever that decimated West Africa in 2014 and killed 11,000. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Madagascar 'worst plague outbreak' in 50 years
The island is one of the global hotspots most prone to the deadly disease. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news