Basics: Everywhere in the Animal Kingdom, Followers of the Milky Way
As scientists learn more about milk ’ s evolution and compositional variations, they are redefining what used to be a signature characteristic of mammals. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NATALIE ANGIER Tags: Milk Animal Behavior Mammals Spiders Insects Flies Beetles Breastfeeding Birds Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian National Zoological Park University of Bayreuth University of California, Dav Source Type: news

High-fat diet associated with a higher risk of kidney damage
(Natural News) If you already have Type 2 diabetes, you need to learn how to properly manage your condition to avoid kidney damage. Consider the results of a new study, which determined that following a high-fat diet can also negatively affect your kidneys. The study was published in the journal Experimental Psychology. When a person... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Paleo diet meal plan: A simple guide
People following a paleo diet eat only foods that were available during the Paleolithic period when humans hunted and gathered all their food. Learn more about it and read our 7-day meal plan here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Is Kombucha Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Kombucha has a golden reputation in the beverage world. It’s everywhere: from supermarket shelves to workplace refrigerators and even on tap in cafés. As this fizzy fermented tea rose in popularity, so did claims of its health benefits, from improved digestion, metabolism, immunity, liver function, heart health and more. But are these claims backed by science — and is kombucha good for you? Here’s what nutrition experts have to say. What is kombucha? Kombucha is a fermented tea drink made from green or black tea (or both), sugar, yeast and bacteria, and is believed to have originated in China about...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Beth Krietsch Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

A reflective group activity supports healthcare staff in England
Regular participation in structured organisation-wide forums, known as Schwartz Center Rounds ® , helps support healthcare staff. The forums are linked with increased empathy and compassion for colleagues and patients, and they facilitate practice change. Levels of poor psychological well-being decrease in forum attendees compared with non-attendees. This NIHR-funded evaluation is the first mixed-methods, large-scale evaluation of the forums in England. They are now more widely adopted in the health service. The evaluation identifies learning and practical tips on running these forums well which could be useful for o...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain injury boy learns to shop and bake
Zack Cohen, 15, is making big strides overcoming a brain injury that left him struggling to walk. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

LD and autism profile problem worse than MH - CQC chief
Mental health is no longer the NHS’ “Cinderella”, but there are still concerns about the profile of learning disability and autism services, a Care Quality Commission senior chief has said. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - February 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Explore Cells from the Inside Out
Download this eBook from Molecular Devices to learn about the wide variety of applications used in modern cell biology! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 11, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace The Scientist Source Type: news

Prevalence of bullying and perceived happiness in adolescents with learning disability, intellectual disability, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorder: in the Taiwan Birth Cohort Pilot Study - Lung FW, Shu BC, Chiang TL, Lin SJ.
Children with learning disability (LD), intellectual disability (ID), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) reported higher risk of being bullied compared to their peers. Controlling for the co-morbidity of dif... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Learning how (and how not) to learn
(Colorado State University) A Guide to Effective Studying and Learning, published by Oxford University Press, is co-authored by Professor Matthew Rhodes, Professor Anne Cleary, and Associate Professor Edward DeLosh, all faculty members in the Colorado State University Department of Psychology. Their experience as learning and memory scientists, as well as decades of established research, form the backbone of the book's major themes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists use machine learning to ID source of Salmonella
(University of Georgia) A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin has developed a machine-learning approach that could lead to quicker identification of the animal source of certain Salmonella outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell component breakdown suggests possible treatment for multiple neural disorders
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Research published today (Feb. 11, 2019) by the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals how one mutation causes fragile X, the most common inherited intellectual disability. Fragile X patients have difficulty in learning and language, as well as temper tantrums, hyperactivity and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. The fragile X gene is located on the X chromosome and its mutation affects about 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 7,000 girls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stress-free training may enhance surgical skill
(University of Houston) It may be easier to learn surgical skills when a student feels less pressure and approaches surgery as a hobby, reports University of Houston professor and director of the Computational Physiology Lab Ioannis Pavlidis, in newly published research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Should You Do About Head Banging?
Discussion Head banging and body rocking are common habits that young children exhibit that can be worrisome or frustrating for parents but that do not cause harm to the child. In a normally developing child they occur around 6-9 months age, and generally resolve around 2-3 years with most behaviors gone by 6-8 years. Children usually do not cause harm to themselves, but it can cause furniture to move causing noise, or potentially the child could lose balance and fall off a bed, or strike an object unintentionally and hurt themself (hit edge of a bed just right in a way that causes a small bruise). The behaviors appear to ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 11, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Improve Clinical Trial Processes with a Unified Platform, New Webinar...
As scientific innovation leads to new trial designs, modern cloud technologies have enabled the industry to better manage how clinical trials are executed. Learn how new technologies can build a...(PRWeb February 11, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/improve_clinical_trial_processes_with_a_unified_platform_new_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16092337.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Depression 101: Dallas schoolkids learn about mental health
Dozens of Dallas-area schools are among a growing number around the world that are teaching children how to spot the signs of depression in themselves and others (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about a blood clot behind the knee
A blood clot can form behind the knee due to injuries, surgery, or poor blood flow. A clot forming in a leg vein is a serious condition that can lead to potentially life-threatening complications, such as a pulmonary embolism. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Source Type: news

Verily Forges Rehabilitation Center to Fight Opioid Crisis
Verily is responding to the opioid crisis through the planned creation of a high-tech rehabilitation center. Dubbed One Fifteen, the proposed rehabilitation center is part of a partnership Verily has with healthcare providers Kettering Health Network and Premier Health, and in partnership with Alexandria Real Estate Equities. One Fifteen will open in Dayton, OH. Verily revealed plans surrounding the center on a blog post dated Feb. 6, 2019. The idea for One Fifteen came from a team of clinicians, engineers, and health systems specialists. The group undertook an assessment of the opioid crisis and uncovered a complex set of...
Source: MDDI - February 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can you have the flu without a fever?
While a fever is a common flu symptom, it does not occur in every case. In this article, learn about the flu without a fever, as well as when to see a doctor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Flu / Cold / SARS Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the symptoms of an iron deficiency?
Iron deficiency symptoms include fatigue, dizziness, and cold extremities. In this article, learn about other symptoms and getting an iron deficiency diagnosis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Which vitamins and minerals are good for acne?
There are many over-the-counter products and prescription medications for treating acne. However, some vitamins and minerals may also help prevent and treat acne. Learn which ones here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

How the Belmont Report clarified informed consent
Sandra Maddock, President & CEO, IMARC Research Imagine being enrolled in a clinical trial without fully understanding the scope or the risks. The Belmont Report marks an important milestone in the history of clinical research. It established guidelines for basic ethical principles, as well as informed consent, the assessment of risks and benefits and subject selection. In this post, we’ll discuss the key principles of the report, and in particular, how it clarified our understanding of informed consent. What is the Belmont Report? The Belmont Report was written in response to the infamous Tuskegee Syphi...
Source: Mass Device - February 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog IMARC Source Type: news

Periodontal Disease Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer ’s Disease
Periodontal experts stress the importance of gum health in older adults and other at-risk groupsCHICAGO – JANUARY 29, 2019 –A recent study has periodontists, experts in the treatment, diagnosis, and prevention of periodontal disease, encouraging patients to maintain gum health in an effort to reduce their Alzheimer ’s disease risk.The study, published in the journalScience Advances, uncovered a potential link betweenP. gingivalis, the bacteria associated with periodontal disease (commonly known as gum disease) and Alzheimer ’s. Researchers analyzed brain tissue, spinal fluid, and saliva from Alzheim...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 8, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Scientists say bees can do basic math
Does math give you trouble? Here's some encouragement: Despite their miniature brains, a new study says honeybees can learn basic arithmetic. If they can do it, so can you! (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Here ’s how precision medicine could change medical imaging
Siemens Healthineers recently won FDA approval for the Cios Spin, a mobile C-arm that delivers precise 3D images for intraoperative quality assurance. (Photo from Siemens Healthineers) The business of precision medical imaging is poised to take off in the next few years, according to a new analysis by Frost & Sullivan. The market research firm’s report, “Growth Opportunities in Precision Medical Imaging, Forecast to 2022,” said new technologies and processes in diagnostic and therapeutic imaging could spur the market to grow from $120 million in 2017 to more than $8 billion by 2027. Technology advance...
Source: Mass Device - February 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Big Data Blog Business/Financial News Diagnostics Emerging Markets Imaging News Well Frost & Sullivan GE Healthcare Philips Healthcare Siemens Healthineers Source Type: news

We're putting a wellness spin on Valentine's Day gifts
Stuck for a novel Valentine ’s Day gift idea for the wellness buff in your life? From a staycation that involves guided meditation to chocolates that trim the excess sugar pounds, here are some ways to celebrate the day, whomever you are with.Instead of just booking a couple ’s massage — learn how... (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kavita Daswani Source Type: news

Early Termination of West Bank Project Affects 120,000+ Clients and 100,000+ Health Workers
February 08, 2019IntraHealth International ’sPalestinian Health Capacity Project shut down its activities on January 31 —eight months before the project was scheduled to end—due to a request by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in response to the newAnti-Terrorism Clarification Act.This early termination will affect more than 120,000 clients who seek specialized medical care outside the West Bank and thousands of West Bank health workers who had been benefiting from the project ’s preservice and continuing education and digital health improvements.Since 2013, IntraHealth led this f...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: West Bank Palestinian Health Capacity Project Technology Policy & Advocacy Health Financing Health Workforce Systems Health in Conflict Source Type: news

Study Finds Uber Reduces Ambulance Use
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (FOX 59) - First responders are sounding the alarm after learning some Hoosiers are calling for an Uber or Lyft instead of an ambulance during a suspected emergency. A recent study by the University of Kansas found when Uber came to a city, ambulance usage dropped by at least 7 percent. The study read, "Many have now started to seek alternate, cheaper transport to the emergency room in the form of ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft." Brian Rasmussen can vouch for that. Over the past two years driving around the City for Uber, he has seen just about every type of person sit in his back ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 8, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

40 Under 40 2019: Patrick White develops innovative projects at BJC Home Care, Washington University
As the chief medical officer for BJC Home Care and chief of the division of Palliative Medicine at Washington University, I have had the opportunity to work with and learn from 650 of the hardest working and most compassionate nurses, therapist, doctors, and staff in the country. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Research robot becomes fan of UK soap opera after watching to learn about dementia
(Edge Hill University) Edge Hill University's robot, Robbie, has watched episodes of a popular UK soap opera to learn how to spot different signs displayed by people with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccinating against chickenpox often causes shingles, even in children
(Natural News) Like all diseases, chickenpox takes a lot of joy out of childhood. When he gets it, he can’t learn more at school, enjoy the sunshine, or even explore the great outdoors. However, if you think that getting a shot for chickenpox solves the problem, think again. According to researchers from Harvard Medical School, healthy... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Fasting may be good for your heart
Fasting and heart health? Researchers aren't sure why, but it seems that regularly fasting potentially can reduce your risk of heart disease. However, there are concerns about the potential side effects of fasting for certain people or in specific circumstances. Learn more from?Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist. *** Also in today's tips ... [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 8, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: 7 steps to reduce your risk of cancer
Cancer prevention: 7 tips to reduce your risk? February is National Cancer Prevention Month, which makes it a good time to learn about what you can do to reduce your risk of developing cancer. In many cases, what is known about cancer prevention is still evolving, so it may seem the advice keeps changing. However, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 8, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Using Real World Evidence to Build Dynamic Cohorts in Real-Time, New...
In this free webinar, learn how a next-generation semantic operational data hub can be used to build dynamic cohorts in real-time using all forms of real world data – significantly shortening the time...(PRWeb February 08, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/using_real_world_evidence_to_build_dynamic_cohorts_in_real_time_new_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16089507.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Higher Education May Not Protect People From Dementia
BOSTON (CBS) – Graduating from college may not protect you from dementia. That’s according to a new study in the journal Neurology. Previous research suggested that spending more time in school might protect a person from dementia by creating a cognitive buffer against mental decline, but researchers at Rush University looked at almost 3,000 people and found that while having a higher level of education was associated with more advanced thinking and memory skills in general, it did not affect when a person developed dementia or how quickly it progressed. That said, they say formal education usually stops long b...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dementia Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Vector Solutions Strengthens Mobile Workforce Management Capabilities with Acquisition of Halligan
Vector Solutions, the leader in industry-focused eLearning and performance support solutions, has acquired Halligan, the innovative developers of a leading mobile application for public safety agencies that streamlines routine maintenance inspections of trucks, tools, medical supplies, drugs, and other items logged in inventory records. The addition of Halligan comes on the heels of Vector’s recent acquisition of CrewSense, reaffirming Vector’s commitment to providing a single operational hub for clients and expanding its eLearning and training platform into a complete performance optimization solution. Halliga...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 7, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Operations Press Releases Source Type: news

New York Biotech Raises $61 Million To Keep Cancer Cells Dormant, Bucking Conventional Treatments
Cancer is thought of as a disease of uncontrolled growth. But over the past few decades scientists have been learning more about cancer cells that behave in a very uncancerlike way. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Kincaid, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

Do You Learn Your Lessons?
When you look back on your career, do you take the time to focus on the lesson learned? (Source: Diagnostic Imaging)
Source: Diagnostic Imaging - February 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Eric Postal, MD Tags: Blog DI Executive Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What can we see with an abdominal ultrasound?
Healthcare professionals may use abdominal ultrasounds to diagnose pancreas, liver, and stomach issues. The procedure requires very little preparation, and there are very few risks. Learn more about abdominal ultrasounds here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Number of cancer cases linked to breast implants soars
FDA said it has received reports of 457 unique cancer cases related to breast implants since 2010, including nine patient deaths. The agency identified those unique cases from a total of 660 adverse event reports in the U.S. from 2010 through September 2018, including 246 new adverse event reports since 2017. FDA began reporting on cases of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a known risk from breast implants, in 2011. The new total of reports is larger than the number of unique cases because patients, providers, and manufacturers may all repo...
Source: Mass Device - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Featured Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants News Well Oncology Women's Health Allergan Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Bipolar medications: Everything you need to know
There is a variety of medications that can help manage bipolar disorder, including mood-stabilizers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Learn more about these and other drugs in this article. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Bipolar Source Type: news

Board Meeting Minutes, November 27, 2018
Participants:  Dave deBronkart, Judy Danielson, Peter Elias, Nancy Finn, Sarah Krüg, Janice McCallum, Jan Oldenburg, Burt Rosen, Danny Sands, Joe Ternullo Minutes from October 23, 2018 meeting approved. Leadership for 2018 – Crunch Time                   Danny and Joe Board members need to recommend or self-nominate candidates for members-at-large. Strongest need is for president-elect and treasurer candidates. Danny has talked to a few potential candidates, but none so far have time to take on the responsibilities f...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Janice McCallum Tags: Board Minutes Board Meetings Source Type: news

UNISON spells out Brexit concerns
As we approach the “crisis point” of 29 March, UNISON has three major Brexit concerns, general secretary Dave Prentis told today’s meeting of the union’s national executive council in London. These are: maintaining workers’ rights; keeping tariff-free, barrier-free trade with our largest trade partners; no hard border in Ireland. On workplace rights, Mr Prentis – who met prime minister Theresa May recently – said it was “notable that the protections offered to investors during transition is far greater than that being offered to workers.” On trade, the general secreta...
Source: UNISON Health care news - February 7, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News 2019 National Delegate Conference activists national executive council NEC Source Type: news

Exclusive: Plans for foundation training for community nursing
Plans are in the pipeline for new foundation training for community nurses, as part of efforts to raise awareness of the role and boost recruitment and retention, Nursing Times has learnt. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 7, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

PET, AI show women's brains age differently than men's
Are women's brains really that much different from men's? In a word, yes. A...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET's view of tau could explain women's early dementia Men greatly outnumber women in academic nuclear medicine Why is soccer ball heading more risky for women? Alzheimer's biomarkers could affect races differently Machine learning predicts working-memory performance (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 7, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Can machine learning deliver critical market insight on consumer needs faster and cheaper?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Consumer brands have long used old-fashioned focus groups, interviews and surveys to best gauge consumer wants, desires and needs as part of processes that range from product development, to marketing and sales. As machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) have emerged, there is an increasing interest in the ability to harness these solutions to save time and money, and to yield more reliable consumer insights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a telenovela was adapted for US audiences: With more sex, violence and alcohol
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) Given the increasing depiction of sex, violence and alcohol use in US media over recent decades, researchers sought to learn if such a 'culture of corruption' would influence an American adaptation of a TV show that originated as Spanish-language telenovela. In a pilot study, the researchers found that the US remake 'Jane the Virgin,' adapted from 'Juana la Virgin,' features more risk behavior and less healthy behavior than the original. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Game behavior can give a hint about player gender
(ITMO University) Researchers from ITMO University managed to predict people's personality features such as gender using data from online gaming platform. This is one of the first studies where machine learning is applied to analyze a large amount of game data. Such an approach can improve the system of personal games recommendations. It can also be used to identify gaming addiction. The results were presented at the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop prostate cancer prediction tool that has unmatched accuracy
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California have developed a novel machine-learning framework that distinguishes between low- and high-risk prostate cancer with more precision than ever before. The framework, described in a Scientific Reports paper published today, is intended to help physicians -- in particular, radiologists -- more accurately identify treatment options for prostate cancer patients, lessening the chance of unnecessary clinical intervention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Among the Many Talents of the Humble Honey Bee: Arithmetic
Honey bees are capable of understanding complex arithmetic, according to a new study published Wednesday. Scientists discovered that bees can “learn to use blue and yellow as symbolic representations for addition or subtraction,” according to the report published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances. While many animals demonstrate an understanding of basic numbers for tasks such as foraging, shoaling, and resource management, more complex math can be done only by a limited number of nonhuman vertebrates. The findings are significant because honey bees and humans are separated by more than 400 million y...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news