Medical News Today: What to expect if your IUD fell out
Intrauterine devices, known as IUDs, are a popular reversible method of contraception. An IUD may fall out or become displaced. There may be signs, such as shorter strings, or symptoms, including severe cramping. If a woman suspects a partial or complete IUD expulsion, she should see a doctor. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Birth Control / Contraception Source Type: news

Learning disabilities: Kids and families struggle beyond the academics
(Boston Children's Hospital) Academic struggles can also create significant stress and anxiety for children and families, report researchers led by Boston Children's neuropsychologist Deborah Waber, PhD. Using a 15-question survey in families of children on IEP plans, they document actionable levels of distress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nanoaggregation on command
(Wiley) A combination of natural microtubules and synthetic macrocyclic receptors allows for the light-controlled, reversible aggregation of the microtubules into larger nanostructures. As Chinese scientists have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, when in a cellular environment these aggregated microtubules can also change cell morphology, causing cell death. The researchers hope to learn more about diseases caused by the improper aggregation of proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Learning from past climatic changes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lecuyer, C. Tags: perspective Source Type: news

Predictive modeling of U.S. health care spending in late life
That one-quarter of Medicare spending in the United States occurs in the last year of life is commonly interpreted as waste. But this interpretation presumes knowledge of who will die and when. Here we analyze how spending is distributed by predicted mortality, based on a machine-learning model of annual mortality risk built using Medicare claims. Death is highly unpredictable. Less than 5% of spending is accounted for by individuals with predicted mortality above 50%. The simple fact that we spend more on the sick—both on those who recover and those who die—accounts for 30 to 50% of the concentration of spendi...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Einav, L., Finkelstein, A., Mullainathan, S., Obermeyer, Z. Tags: Economics reports Source Type: news

Ultrafast neuronal imaging of dopamine dynamics with designed genetically encoded sensors
Neuromodulatory systems exert profound influences on brain function. Understanding how these systems modify the operating mode of target circuits requires spatiotemporally precise measurement of neuromodulator release. We developed dLight1, an intensity-based genetically encoded dopamine indicator, to enable optical recording of dopamine dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution in behaving mice. We demonstrated the utility of dLight1 by imaging dopamine dynamics simultaneously with pharmacological manipulation, electrophysiological or optogenetic stimulation, and calcium imaging of local neuronal activity. dLight1 enab...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patriarchi, T., Cho, J. R., Merten, K., Howe, M. W., Marley, A., Xiong, W.-H., Folk, R. W., Broussard, G. J., Liang, R., Jang, M. J., Zhong, H., Dombeck, D., von Zastrow, M., Nimmerjahn, A., Gradinaru, V., Williams, J. T., Tian, L. Tags: Neuroscience, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

The Facts on Tampons —and How to Use Them Safely
Tampons are medical devices regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. And if you or a loved one uses them, it ’s important to use them safely. Learn the basics and consider this advice. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is a differential blood test?
The differential blood test tells doctors how many of each type of white blood cell are in the body. Knowing these levels can help a doctor to diagnose a variety of acute and chronic illnesses. In this article, learn about the types of white blood cell and how to interpret the results of a differential blood test. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to eat in your second trimester
When pregnant, a person should be mindful of getting enough vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats, and carbohydrates to encourage healthy growth and to prevent complications. During the second trimester, the body also needs slightly more calories. In this article, learn about which foods to eat and which to avoid. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Fifteen good foods for high blood pressure
The diet has a strong influence on blood pressure. Certain foods are scientifically shown to reduce high blood pressure, including berries, bananas, and oats. In some cases, dietary changes alone can lower blood pressure to normal levels. Learn more about good foods for high blood pressure, or hypertension, here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about hernias after a cesarean delivery
An incisional hernia is a rare complication of cesarean delivery. Hernias can cause dangerous health issues, so it is important to know the symptoms. In this article, learn about the risk factors for a hernia after cesarean delivery. We also cover the symptoms of a hernia, how to treat it, and the recovery process. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Webcast Featuring New AHRQ SOPS ™ Health IT Patient Safety Supplemental Items for Hospitals
July 25, 2018 2:00-2:50pm ET. Join AHRQ for this Webcast to learn about the new Surveys on Patient Safety Culture (SOPSTM) Health Information Technology (IT) Patient Safety Supplemental Items. The Webcast will discuss the importance of health IT in patient safety, provide an overview of the development of the items, and provide results from an initial pilot. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Why is a prolactin level test done?
A prolactin level test is done to look for health conditions that relate to the hormone prolactin. Results may indicate pituitary disorders, hypothyroidism, kidney disease, or liver disease. Male and female fertility and milk production are also affected. Treatment for high levels includes medication. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical Devices / Diagnostics Source Type: news

Three Lessons We Can Learn from 40+ Years of Community Health Worker Programs
June 27, 2018What will it take to finally create sustainable,  scalable programs for community health workers?“To respond effectively and appropriately to needs and expectations, health services need to be organized around close-to-community networks of people-centred primary care…”—WHO 13th General Program of WorkThe global health community first made widescale investments in community health workers (CHWs) more than 40 years ago. But last month, I left the 71st World Health Assembly wondering whether we had learned anything from CHW experiences over the last several decades.The 1978 Declarat...
Source: IntraHealth International - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Reinventing the Healthcare Continuum with Machine Data Analytics
As healthcare delivery organizations navigate the dual challenges of providing high-quality medical care while facing tougher cost control measures from insurance carriers and government entities, one strategy they are turning to is optimization of both expensive equipment, as well as the entire ecosystem in which these assets operate. This is no small task, as capital expenditures for these machines totaled more than $350 billion in 2016.[1] Innovators in many industries have adopted asset optimization strategies for several years. Now, leaders in healthcare equipment manufacturing are turning to this approach by implemen...
Source: MDDI - June 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Puneet Pandit Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

FDA grants de novo clearance to Avenu Medical for Ellipsys vascular access system
Vascular access system maker Avenu Medical said today it won FDA de novo clearance for its Ellipsys vascular access system designed for use with end-stage renal disease patients who require hemodialysis. The San Juan Capistrano, Calif.-based company touted that its Ellipsys EndoAVF technology acts as an alternative to traditional AV fistula creation. The system, which can be used under local or regional anesthesia, uses an ultrasound-guided catheter that delivers a small amount of thermal energy to fuse a permanent anastomosis between the vein and artery to create an AVF. “Using the Ellipsys vascular access...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Vascular Avenu Medical Source Type: news

HeartFlow wins UnitedHealthcare coverage for FFRct analysis
HeartFlow said today that it won reimbursement coverage from insurer UnitedHealthcare, which will now cover its HeartFlow FFRct fractional flow reserve analysis for its 45 million members. HeartFlow’s FFRct technology works by taking the data from a standard CT scan and applying algorithms that result in a color-coded 3D “map” detailing the changes in flow across coronary lesions. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company touted that with the new coverage, its HeartFlow FFRct is available to 235 million individuals in the US. “This decision by UnitedHealthcare underscores the significant valu...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blog HeartFlow Source Type: news

What Can Cancer Specialists Learn From Patients Who Beat All The Odds?
A Harvard Medical School project aims to become the first national registry for exceedingly rare cancer patients who respond mysteriously well to treatments that failed to help others.(Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carey Goldberg Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Are Epsom salt baths safe during pregnancy?
Epsom salt is a common home remedy for many ailments. Taking an Epsom salt bath can be an effective and safe way for people to ease aches and pains during pregnancy. However, they must take care not to ingest the Epsom salt or overheat. Here, learn more about the potential benefits of Epsom salt baths during pregnancy. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about reduced blood flow to the brain
The brain requires constant blood flow for it to function correctly. Not getting enough blood flow to the brain could be a sign of a vertebrobasilar circulatory disorder. Symptoms can include slurred speech and dizziness. Learn more about the symptoms and causes of vertebrobasilar circulatory disorders here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

The effect of errorless learning on psychotic and affective symptoms, as well as aggression and apathy in patients with Korsakoff's syndrome in long-term care facilities - Rensen YCM, Egger JIM, Westhoff J, Walvoort SJW, Kessels RPC.
Objectives:Errorless learning is a promising rehabilitation principle for learning tasks in patients with amnesia, including patients with Korsakoff's syndrome. Errorless learning might possibly also contribute to decreases in behavioral and psychiatric pr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Mind the gap: 11 years of train-related injuries at the Royal London Hospital Major Trauma Centre - Virdee J, Pafitanis G, Alamouti R, Brohi K, Patel H.
This study presents an extensive retrospective database of patients with polytrauma following train-related injuries and highlights the key lessons learnt in this rare clinical presentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively col... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Infographic: Brain vascular malformation
Learn more about brain vascular malformation. Other health tip infographics: mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com? (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 27, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Are You Interested in Helping Parents and Their Young Children?
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 26, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence to Boost Liquid Biopsies
Machine-learning algorithms tuned to detecting cancer DNA in the blood could pave the way for personalized cancer care. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 26, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Books of The Times: What the Living Can Learn by Looking Death Straight in the Eye
In “ Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them), ” Sallie Tisdale writes about what she ’ s learned from spending time with the dying. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PARUL SEHGAL Tags: Books and Literature Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them): A Practical Perspective on Death and Dying (Book) Tisdale, Sallie Source Type: news

Curing a deadly childhood disease, sharing her love of science, and a sleek ’68 Corvette drive this biochemist
Spend a brief amount of time with biochemist Rachelle Crosbie-Watson and you ’ll quickly realize that “drive” is one of her favorite words.With equal enthusiasm, she ’ll describe studying “the small molecules that drive life,” and her 1968 convertible Corvette being “a blast to drive.” The symmetry is hard to miss: Crosbie-Watson drives a classic muscle car to UCLA, where she studies the biochemical reactions that drive muscle cell functions. Her lab is hotly pursuing new drugs that one day may halt the progression of a deadly childhood muscle-wasting disease, allowing k...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hopkins Nursing Dean on Solutions to Trauma, Violence, Social Issues
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - June 26, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

The Science Behind Happy Relationships
When it comes to relationships, most of us are winging it. We’re exhilarated by the early stages of love, but as we move onto the general grind of everyday life, personal baggage starts to creep in and we can find ourselves floundering in the face of hurt feelings, emotional withdrawal, escalating conflict, insufficient coping techniques and just plain boredom. There’s no denying it: making and keeping happy and healthy relationships is hard. But a growing field of research into relationships is increasingly providing science-based guidance into the habits of the healthiest, happiest couples — and how to ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Treleaven Tags: Uncategorized Love & Relationships Source Type: news

Scientist explains the effect of stress on your body
Michael J.Porter, a lecturer in Molecular Genetics at the University of Central Lancashire, insists that by understanding what happens inside our bodies we can learn to control stress and use it for good. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is a slit lamp exam?
A slit lamp exam is a routine procedure where a doctor shines a light into the eye to look for injuries or diseases. These may include a detached retina, corneal abrasion, or cataracts. Abnormal results can also indicate infection, inflammation, or increased eye pressure. Learn more about the slit lamp exam here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the side effects of aspartame?
The food additive aspartame is a sweetener used in many foods and drinks. It is controversial and has a range of purported side effects, although many regulatory agencies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approve its use. Learn more about the side effects of aspartame, and the alternatives, here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Why does depression make you feel tired?
Depression can lead to a lack of physical and emotional energy, in addition to causing sleep disturbances that leave a person feeling chronically fatigued. In this article, learn about the link between fatigue and depression, as well as the possible complications and how to cope. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news

Executive Committee Minutes, May 8, 2018
Participants: Peter Elias, Judy Danielson, John Grohol, Sarah Krüg, Janice McCallum, Burt Rosen, Danny Sands, Joe Ternullo, Sue Woods April Exec Meeting Minutes approved. Learning Exchange – Sarah Krüg First Learning Exchange webinar will be held on May 29, 1 pm ET on the topic of Social Isolation. Vocera (one of the sponsors) will offer their WebEx & support for the event. Need to promote the webinar using the appropriate WebEx account. Accenture will promote, as will speakers. Sarah has a draft email & will send to members via MailChimp. All board members are encouraged to share info on the webina...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - June 26, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Janice McCallum Tags: General Exec Committee Executive Committee Minutes Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Serotonin enhances learning, not just mood
Serotonin levels have been linked to the regulation of mood and sexual function. Emerging research now reveals more about its role in learning processes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology / Neuroscience Source Type: news

A deep learning scheme for mental workload classification based on restricted Boltzmann machines - Zhang J, Li S.
The mental workload (MWL) classification is a critical problem for quantitative assessment and analysis of operator functional state in many safety-critical situations with indispensable human-machine cooperation. The MWL can be measured by psychophysiolog... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Cross-subject mental workload classification using kernel spectral regression and transfer learning techniques - Zhang J, Wang Y, Li S.
Due to the poor generalizability of the subject-specific mental workload (MWL) classifier, we propose a cross-subject MWL recognition framework in this paper. Firstly, we use fuzzy mutual information-based wavelet-packet transform (FMI-WPT) technique to ex... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Sustainable usage through emotional engagement: a user experience analysis of an adaptive driving school application - Dirin A, Laine TH, Nieminen M.
This paper explores the factors affecting sustainable usage of digital services, such as mobile learning (m-learning) applications. We define a conceptual model of digital service sustainability and its measurement indicators and criteria. We assess the co... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Testing neurophysiological markers related to fear-potentiated startle - Seligowski AV, Bondy E, Singleton P, Orcutt HK, Ressler KJ, Auerbach RP.
Fear-potentiated startle (FPS) paradigms provide insight into fear learning mechanisms that contribute to impairment among individuals with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Electrophysiology also has provided insight into these mechanisms through the ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Why do I get heart palpitations after I eat?
Some people experience heart palpitations after eating. This could be due to a range of causes, some of which are more serious than others. Specific foods and drinks are often responsible, with studies confirming alcohol as a trigger. Here, learn more about the causes of heart palpitations and when to see a doctor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Personalized Lung Cancer Screening Tool Adds Asbestos Exposure
A University of Michigan and Veterans Affairs research team has developed a novel, personalized lung cancer screening tool that accounts for past asbestos exposure. Asbestos exposure is best known as the primary cause of mesothelioma, but it also significantly increases the chance of developing lung cancer. Adding asbestos to the lung-cancer screening tool also should help identify mesothelioma in its earliest stages, when it is most treatable. Mesothelioma is not usually diagnosed until it has progressed into stage 3 or stage 4, when treatment is more palliative than potentially curative. The tool is designed to better i...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 26, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Dense breast tissue translates into higher cancer odds
A large study out of Norway found that women with dense breast tissue do have...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Synthesized 2D mammo works well for density assessment Age, not density, predicts interval breast cancer result Automated breast density assessment informs cancer risk Deep-learning algorithm can assess breast density Breast density laws mystify primary care providers (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What types of blood disorders are there?
When the cells in the blood do not function as they should, it is possible a person has a blood disorder. Examples include leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Common blood disorder symptoms include unexplained exhaustion and weight loss. Learn more about the types of blood disorder and the signs to look out for here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Blood / Hematology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about birth control and alcohol
Alcohol does not directly reduce the effectiveness of birth control. However, excessive drinking may prevent a person from taking the birth control pill correctly, or increase their likelihood of engaging in risky behavior. Side effects such as vomiting can also increase the chance of pregnancy. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Birth Control / Contraception Source Type: news

SNMMI: Molecular imaging method monitors gene therapy
PHILADELPHIA - A new molecular imaging method can monitor the level and location...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: SNMMI: AI can avoid patient misidentification on PET/CT SNMMI: New therapy aids patients with neuroendocrine tumors SNMMI 2018: A year of promotion and ongoing challenges Machine learning may identify medulloblastoma subtypes DWI-MRI could help show gene expression in tumors (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 26, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Pollen allergy: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Pollen allergies are a common but irritating problem for many people. There are different types of pollen, so people may experience symptoms at different times of the year depending on which plants affect them. Learn about the types of pollen allergies, symptoms, treatment, and home remedies in this article. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Seasonal Allergy Source Type: news

Serotonin speeds learning
(Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown) Why do treatments with antidepressants like Prozac seem to work better when combined with behavioral therapies, which promote the learning of positive behaviors by the depressed patient? A new study suggests a possible explanation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computational model analysis reveals serotonin speeds learning
(Sainsbury Wellcome Centre) A new computational-model designed by researchers at UCL based on data from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown reveals that serotonin, one of the most widespread chemicals in the brain, can speed up learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA global health program aims to boost neurological care in South Africa
When it came to getting the best treatment for his parents ’ neurologic illnesses, Sam Miller and his family experienced frustration finding the right doctors in their home country of South Africa.Miller ’s mother, Brenda, developed multiple sclerosis in her late 20s, and his father, Winston, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in his 60s.Over the four decades of his mother ’s illness before her death in 2008, the increasingly acute shortage of neurologists in South Africa made the top specialists there much sought-after and overworked. They had little time to talk through treatment options, much...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The 7 ages of appetite: Understand these phases to eat better and prevent obesity
(Natural News) Most people think that the desire to eat is driven by hunger. But appetite is not as simple as originally thought. Learning how it works and the seven phases it goes through over the years will help you make better decisions about what you eat and in the process, avoid diet-related problems such... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news