Medical News Today: Can you drink alcohol if you have COPD?
The link between alcohol and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unclear. While smoking is the biggest cause and risk factor for COPD, alcohol may also play a role. Whether a person with COPD can drink alcohol safely may depend on factors such as the severity of symptoms. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: COPD Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Does COPD show up on an X-ray?
Diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can involve an X-ray, which may show enlarged lungs and diaphragm problems. Doctors may order X-rays and other tests when a person has symptoms, such as shortness of breath or chest tightness. Learn more about how doctors interpret X-rays to diagnose the condition here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: COPD Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Using Facebook to predict depression
Using machine-learning technology, scientists may soon be able to accurately predict a diagnosis of depression by examining Facebook posts. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Depression Source Type: news

Grant to fund video game that will help children with ADHD
(Ohio University) A $1.38 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education will fund the development of a new video game designed to help kids with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) learn academic skills and better succeed in school. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How does brain structure influence performance on language tasks?
(University at Buffalo) The architecture of each person's brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, scientists are developing a new tool -- computational models of the brain -- to simulate how the structure of the brain may impact brain activity and, ultimately, human behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers propose conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis
(Kessler Foundation) 'Exercise is a low-cost, non-invasive modality,' noted Dr. John DeLuca, 'so we are very interested in learning more about how activity results in these improvements. Rethinking how we view exercise in the long-term management of MS and other neurological conditions is our first step. We anticipate that the PRIMERS framework will accelerate advances in treatment by integrating the contributions from neuroscience, neurophysiology, and neurorehabilitation. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Day of discharge does not influence heart surgery patient readmission rates, study finds
FINDINGSA study has found that the day of the week that a patient is discharged from the hospital does not affect the likelihood that he or she will be readmitted. The study showed comparable readmission rates for weekday and weekend or holiday discharge. It has been speculated that patients who are discharged on a weekend or holiday, when staff levels are typically lower, might be more likely to be readmitted to the hospital.The researchers found that the use before surgery of beta-blockers, a type of medication used to treat heart conditions; tobacco use; and surgical site infections were independent predictors of readmi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Earth & Environment
Our planet gives up its secrets slowly. But every year we learn more about its oceans and air, its restless continents, its myriad ecosystems, and the way living things interact with their environments. More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/overviews/earth-environ/index.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_51 This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Book Review: The Neuroscience of Emotion:  A New Synthesis
Emotions, while ubiquitous across species and one of the most common topics of conversation, are still, it seems, misunderstood. Do emotions have biological roots and, if so, where? And how do physiological factors influence how emotions are felt, expressed, and understood? For Ralph Adolphs and David J. Anderson, developing a comprehensive science of emotions began with trying to create a framework that is scientifically rigorous, inclusive, cumulative, and yet provides clear operationalization of the relevant concepts of emotions. Their new book, The Neuroscience of Emotion: A New Synthesis, offers a new way to understan...
Source: Psych Central - October 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Anger Book Reviews Disorders General Grief and Loss Happiness Memory and Perception Neuroscience Personality Psychology Emotions Feelings The Neuroscience of Emotion Source Type: news

Develop the Skills Required to Secure Employment
Registration is now open for the Employment Acquisition Skills Boot Camp for Scientists, a new professional development program by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs in the United States do an excellent job of preparing students for careers in academia. As students and a growing number of reports note, however, many STEM graduate students are interested in employment in a variety of sectors by the time they complete their degree. Students continue to report that they feel ill-prepared and ill-equipped to pursue employment in thes...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Enhance your Interdisciplinary and Team Science Skills
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an inter-disciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingl...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS an...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Develop the Skills Required to Secure Employment
Registration is now open for the Employment Acquisition Skills Boot Camp for Scientists, a new professional development program by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs in the United States do an excellent job of preparing students for careers in academia. As students and a growing number of reports note, however, many STEM graduate students are interested in employment in a variety of sectors by the time they complete their degree. Students continue to report that they feel ill-prepared and ill-equipped to pursue employment in thes...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Communications Boot Camp for Scientists: Only a Few Spots Remaining
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) is offering a professional development program designed to enhance the communication skills of scientists, particularly those interested in communicating with decision-makers and the news media. The program is an excellent way to develop new communication skills and identify effective methods for broadening the impact of research and education programs. The AIBS Communications Training Boot Camp for Scientists expands on AIBS’s highly successful media and science policy training workshops. The Boot Camp meets the needs of everyone from graduate students to senior ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - October 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Interrupting the Medtech Status Quo
As a facial trauma surgeon, Dr. Alan Johnson hated using wires and arch bars to immobilize jaws to help heal jaw fractures. “This is commonly known as ‘having your jaw wired shut,’ "Johnson told MD+DI. “It’s miserable for patients, time consuming and risky for surgeons, and an inefficient use of healthcare resources for the health system. The wires are painful to patients’ gums. The application of the wires puts surgeons and their teammates at risk for sharps injuries. And, the techniques used to app...
Source: MDDI - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Design Source Type: news

Second Opinion at Duke Offers Hope for Liver Transplant
Treatment TermsLiver transplant Sub-Title Patient Turned Down Elsewhere Is Placed on Duke Waiting List Overview Lemuel Stewart was on track to being approved for a liver transplant when he got the bad news: His age and previous heart surgery disqualified him for a transplant at a local medical center. That changed a few weeks later, when he sought help at Duke Health. “In three days, Duke did the testing that took six months at the other center,” said Stewart, who is 71 and lives near Richmond, VA. “The next week, Duke called and said, ‘We’re going to put you on the list.’” He...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Features - October 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

AHA: After 2 Breast Cancer Diagnoses, Survivor Learns She Needs a New Heart
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Surgery for ulcerative colitis: What to know
Sometimes, medications for ulcerative colitis do not adequately control the symptoms, and a person may need surgery. Learn about the types of procedure and what to expect. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ulcerative Colitis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What's the link between ulcerative colitis and joint pain?
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, some people with UC experience joint pain. Joint pain usually occurs with flare-ups and disappears during remission. Learn more about the link between ulcerative colitis and joint pain here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ulcerative Colitis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can ulcerative colitis be fatal?
Doctors do not usually consider ulcerative colitis (UC) to be a life-threatening condition, but it may increase a person ’s risk of some serious complications. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ulcerative Colitis Source Type: news

Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) – Chelsea Misquith, Ruth Lilly Medical Library
Thanks to the NNLM/GMR, I was able to attend the 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) this year in Albuquerque, New Mexico from September 26 – 30. JCLC is a joint initiative organized by the ethnic caucuses of the American Library Association (ALA): American Indian Library Association (AILA), the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and REFORMA: The National Association to Promote Library & Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-spe...
Source: The Cornflower - October 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Miles Dietz-Castel Tags: Blog Conferences and Meetings Funding Source Type: news

Appeals court overturns Stryker win in retaliatory filing case
A federal appeals court yesterday overturned a lower court’s decision to toss a retaliatory filing case against Stryker (NYSE:SYK) after finding conflicts within the company’s testimony. Plaintiff Kelley Donley sued the orthopedics giant in June 2015 after Stryker fired her, allegedly for taking compromising pictures of an important vendor – but also shortly after she lodged a sexual harassment complaint that led to a manager’s ouster, according to court documents. The U.S. District Court for Northern Illinois dismissed the case in January 2017 after finding that Donley failed to link her filing and...
Source: Mass Device - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News personnel-moves Stryker Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can you take too much magnesium?
Magnesium is essential for health, but taking too much can cause problems, including digestive issues, lethargy, and an irregular heartbeat. In rare cases, an overdose can be fatal. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can COPD run in families?
Genetic factors can make it more likely that a person will develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, other causes, such as smoking and environmental toxins, are more significant. Preventive measures can help reduce the impact of the genetic risk factors for this disease. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: COPD Source Type: news

South Africa:South African Girls Learn Self-Defence As Boys Learn Empathy to Tackle Sexual Violence
[This is Africa] The South African charity Action Breaks Silence is working with schools to educate girls in self-defence and mental strength while encouraging boys to be empathetic and emotionally expressive. So far, more than 12,000 girls and 1,365 boys in 150 schools countrywide have been through the programme. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 16, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

AHA: After 2 Breast Cancer Diagnoses, Survivor Learns She Needs a New Heart
TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The hair loss, fatigue and nausea were a given. As a nurse, Toni C. Wild had seen patients faced with these common side effects of chemotherapy. What Wild did not expect when she was diagnosed... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Member Highlights: Stony Brook University, Southampton, NY
NNLM MAR is pleased to share successes of health outreach projects and activities in our region. Learn what your amazing colleagues are doing to increase access to quality health information for the communities they serve. Connect to Your Health Fair The Applied Health Informatics program at Stony Brook University received the “Outreach to Consumers” Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to conduct a Wellness Fair for the senior population in the Southampton, N.Y. The purpose of the Wellness Fair was to encourage patient engagement and health literacy through health technologies, patient-phy...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Member Highlights Source Type: news

Value: A Balancing Act
There are perhaps few buzzwords bandied around in pharma circles as much in recent years as ‘value’. Companies are actively competing to stress value over volume and highlight their zealous efforts to go well ‘beyond the pill’ and deliver real value for every stakeholder in healthcare, from the patient up.A cynic might suggest that such talk is simply pharma marketing speak but, with ever-tightened purse strings, payers are demanding that pharma delivers on its promises, as they seek to understand how much bang for their buck they can expect when they purchase drugs.“We are over the tipping po...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ross Davies Source Type: news

Thousands of Glasgow women set to strike for equal pay
Thousands of low-paid women in Glasgow are striking for equal pay next Tuesday and Wednesday – 23 and 24 October. In 2018. In one of the UK’s largest councils. Around 8,000 women including school administration workers, learning support workers in schools, nursery workers, home carers, cleaners, caterers and other council workers are taking action over the city council’s failure to settle a long-standing equal-pay dispute. It will be the largest industrial action of its type since the Equal Pay Act was passed in the wake of the Ford machinists’ strike, immortalised in the film and stage show Made In...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - October 16, 2018 Category: Food Science Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article News equal pay glasgow Industrial action local government low pay Scotland scotland local government Scottish local government women women members Source Type: news

Automated system identifies dense tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer, in mammograms
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed an automated model that assesses dense breast tissue in mammograms -- which is an independent risk factor for breast cancer -- as reliably as expert radiologists. This marks the first time a deep-learning model of its kind has successfully been used in a clinic on real patients, according to the researchers. With broad implementation, the researchers hope the model can help bring greater reliability to breast density assessments across the nation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Infants are more likely to learn when with a peer
(University of Connecticut) Researchers at the University of Connecticut and University of Washington looked at the mechanisms involved in language learning among nine-month-olds, the youngest population known to be studied in relation to on-screen learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Machine-learning driven findings uncover new cellular players in tumor microenvironment
(CytoReason) New findings presented today by CytoReason reveals possible new cellular players in the tumor microenvironment that could impact the treatment process for the most in-need patients -- those who have already failed to respond to ipilimumab (anti-CTLA4) immunotherapy. Once validated, the findings could point the way to improved strategies for the staging and ordering of key immunotherapies in refractory melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Have you heard of the MIND diet? Learn how to boost your mental health with this new healthy eating plan
(Natural News) Living healthy is a choice that many people want to make. However, choosing an appropriate diet can get overwhelming since there are so many choices available. Each of these diets are catered towards specific people with specific needs. For those people who want to focus on keeping their mind healthy, the MIND diet... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deep Learning-Based Genedata Imagence ® for Automated High-Content...
Innovative software solution enables efficient analysis of phenotypic high-content screens(PRWeb October 16, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/deep_learning_based_genedata_imagence_for_automated_high_content_image_analysis_debuts_at_slas_conference/prweb15831302.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Microsoft Dives Deeper into Genomics with AI Collaboration
Microsoft is looking to strengthen its commitment to genomics and is partnering with Genoox, a healthcare technology company, to accomplish this goal. The collaboration will combine the performance of Microsoft Genomics’ Azure Cloud with Tel Aviv, Israel-based Genoox’s comprehensive cloud-based advanced framework for Next-Generation DNA Sequencing (NGS). The companies said that the collaboration will advance the fields of genomics, healthcare and Artificial Intelligence (AI) and benefit clinicians and scientists who require rapid delivery of clinically actionable insights and...
Source: MDDI - October 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Quiz: Understand the Genetics of Skin Cancer
What role do genetics play in skin cancer? Test your knowledge with our latest quiz, while learning more about gene mutations. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

2018 winner of the prestigious Aubrey Sheiham Leadership Award for Evidence-Based Healthcare in Africa announced
Dr Chikwendu J. Edehas been announced as the 2018 winner of the prestigious Aubrey Sheiham Leadership Award by Cochrane.The award is managed byCochrane South Africa (SA) and presented annually to an African researcher to support the conduct of a Cochrane Review focusing on a priority topic with impact on the health of people living in low- and middle-income countries. The winner is also expected to mentor a novice author from Africa during the review process and, in so doing, develop capacity in research synthesis on the continent.The award includes attendance at an annual Cochrane Colloquium; costs of face-to-face meeting...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - October 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What can cause facial swelling?
A person's face can become swollen in response to injuries, allergic reactions, infections, and other medical conditions. Face swelling that occurs alongside other symptoms, such as breathing difficulties or rapid heartbeat, may indicate anaphylaxis, which requires immediate medical assistance. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How to make a heating pad at home
Heating pads can relieve muscle aches and cramps, and help injuries heal. In this article, learn three ways to make a homemade heating pad. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Complementary Medicine / Alternative Medicine Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What tests are used to diagnose COPD?
As well as carrying out a physical examination and gathering a person ’s medical history, doctors typically order one or more tests to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These tests may include pulmonary function tests, blood tests, and imaging tests. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: COPD Source Type: news

The Cycle: Why I Wanted to Learn to Perform Abortions
With the future of contraception in question, looking back to recent history is instructive. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JEN GUNTER Tags: Abortion Pregnancy and Childbirth Women and Girls your-feed-selfcare Source Type: news

Americans want to know more than just the list price of a medicine —and we’re answering their call
The biopharmaceutical industry is answering the call to provide more information about medicine costs. As innovators of life-saving therapies, we recognize the importance of giving people the information they need to better manage their care. Throughout 2018, we went around the country to speak directly with voters, patients, provider groups and other stakeholders to learn what information would be most helpful to them. We heard four big things:   (Source: The Catalyst)
Source: The Catalyst - October 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: drug cost out of pocket costs Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can COPD cause anxiety?
People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may experience breathlessness. This physical symptom can trigger anxiety and panic in some people. Breathing exercises, medication, and other techniques can help people control these psychological symptoms. Learn more about COPD and anxiety here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: COPD Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about ulcerative colitis in children
While ulcerative colitis is more common in those between the ages of 15 and 30 years old, it can also occur in children. Learn about the symptoms, risk factors, and treatments. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ulcerative Colitis Source Type: news

Partnership Is Key To Better Patient Programs
Online shoppers do not struggle when using Amazon or eBay. Over the last 20 years, ecommerce providers have coalesced around a common set of tools to help shoppers find what they want.As the healthcare sector focuses on developing digitized patient support programs, it needs to understand how a similar sense of usability will emerge.At arecent webinar, organized by eyeforpharma and S3 Connected Health, we polled 234 participants to understand how they see patient support programs (PSPs) developing.It is clear the stakes are high; 40% said they were'a significant way to make medicine more holistic', while 38% said PSPs woul...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jim O ' Donoghue Source Type: news

NuSmile Summit Set for February 15-16, 2019
Unprecedented CE event targets pediatric dentists, general dentists and their teamsHOUSTON, TEXAS, October 4, 2018 —NuSmile Ltd., the worldwide leader in pediatric esthetic restorative dentistry, announced today that the second annual NuSmile Summit will be held February 15-16, 2019 in Clearwater Beach, Florida. The event’s format allows doctors and their team members to create their own schedule by choosing the specific courses that best meet their individual needs. Attendees will receive up to 16 continuing education credits from a combination of hands-on and lecture courses taught by several of the world&rsq...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - October 15, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Resting-state functional connectivity of the habenula in mood disorder patients with and without suicide-related behaviors - Ambrosi E, Arciniegas DB, Curtis KN, Patriquin MA, Spalletta G, Sani G, Frueh BC, Fowler JC, Madan A, Salas R.
The habenula is a small midbrain structure that is important for brain signaling and learning from negative events. Thus, the habenula is strongly connected to both the reward system and motor regions. Increasing evidence suggests a role for the habenula i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Social learning under the labeling effect: exploring travellers' behavior in social dilemmas - Marek EM.
The objectives of this study were twofold. Firstly, it was aimed at investigat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Perception and Communication, Warnings, Operating Instructions Source Type: news

Use of a machine learning algorithm to predict individuals with suicide ideation in the general population - Ryu S, Lee H, Lee DK, Park K.
In this study, we aimed to develop a model predicting individuals with suicide ideation within a general population using a machine learning algorithm. METHODS: Among 35,116 individuals aged over 19 years from the Korea National Health&... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Personality variables in risk perception, learning and risky choice after safety training: data of two empirical intervention studies contrasting immersive VR and PowerPoint - Leder J, Horlitz T, Puschmann P, Wittstock V, Sch ütz A.
The data provided contains personality variables as well as risk perception, choice data and learning outcomes after safety training which differed between subject regarding whether it was carried out in immersive virtual reality (VR) or as a PowerPoint. T... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news