Use of ichthyofauna by artisanal fishermen at two protected areas along the coast of Northeast Brazil
Conclusions: Artisanal fishing should be understood as a cultural activity, because the different and multiple uses fish make up the dynamics of fishing communities. Just as in the areas of this study, some of these communities are included in protected areas and, therefore, fishermen must be involved in the development and implementation of management plans of these units. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 6, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marcia PintoJosé MourãoRômulo Alves Source Type: research

Fishers¿ knowledge about fish trophic interactions in the southeastern Brazilian coast
Conclusions: The LEK of the studied fishers showed a high degree of concordance with the scientific literature regarding fish diet. This study evidenced the value of fishers’ LEK to improve fisheries research and management, as well as the needy to increase the collaboration among managers, biologists and fishers. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 5, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Milena RamiresMariana ClauzetWalter BarrellaMatheus RotundoRenato SilvanoAlpina Begossi Source Type: research

Use-value and importance of socio-cultural knowledge on Carapa procera trees in the Sudanian zone in Mali
Conclusion: This study highlighted the sociocultural importance of Carapa procera. In the light of its multipurpose uses, the promotion and enhancement of Carapa procera can provide significant socio-economic benefits to local people. In this perspective, it is necessary to implement conservation strategies and sustainable management through domestication of the species. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 2, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Urbain DembéléAnne LykkeYénizié KonéBino TéméAmadou Kouyaté Source Type: research

Medicinal plant knowledge in Caribbean Basin: a comparative study of Afrocaribbean, Amerindian and Mestizo communities
Conclusions: Although migration, cultural intermixing and a consequent hybridization of medicinal plant knowledge have occurred in the Caribbean Basin, the results highlight differences between the three studied groups in terms of the medicinal plant repertoire they employ for primary health care. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 25, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Wendy Torres-AvilezMartha Méndez-GonzálezRafael Durán-GarcíaIsabelle BoulogneLionel Germosén-Robineau Source Type: research

Art, fisheries and ethnobiology
Conclusions: Regarding the evaluation of baselines, we should consider that art may represent abundant fish in certain historic periods and geographic regions. Art could be an important temporal and geographical indicator to discover preterit information on the abundance of fish and compare it to present abundance. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alpina BegossiRodrigo Caires Source Type: research

Plant extractivism in light of game theory: a case study in northeastern Brazil
Conclusions: The "game of extractivism" of pequis and fava d'anta operates under conditions similar to the "tragedy of the commons." In this game, the non-cooperative solution is converted to the Nash equilibrium. The approach used in this study contributed to the identification of strategies and solutions to problems arising from the extractivism of pequi and fava d'anta. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Rafael SilvaLaura GomesUlysses Albuquerque Source Type: research

Local health practices and the knowledge of medicinal plants in a Brazilian semi-arid region: environmental benefits to human health
Conclusions: The informants had a broad and integrated view of health, perceiving the importance of conserving the environment within the National Forest of Araripe for the health and well-being of the local populations. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sofia ZankNivaldo PeroniElcida de AraújoNatalia Hanazaki Source Type: research

Art, fisheries and ethnobiology
Conclusions: Regarding the evaluation of baselines, we should consider that art may represent abundant fish in certain historic periods and geographic regions. Art could be an important temporal and geographical indicator to discover preterit information on the abundance of fish and compare it to present abundance. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alpina BegossiRodrigo Caires Source Type: research

Ready for phase 5 - current status of ethnobiology in Southeast Asia
This study aims to provide an analysis of the current status of ethnobiology in Southeast Asia and outlines possibilities for future advancements. Methods: We accessed papers cited in the Scopus and Web of Science databases for the period of 1960 to 2014 using the current as well as previous names of the 11Southeast Asian countries and various disciplines of ethnobiology as key words. We juxtaposed the number of publications from each country against its number of indigenous groups and languages, to see if ethnobiology research has addressed this full spectrum of ethnical diversity. The available data for the last ten year...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 22, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Syafitri HidayatiF FrancoRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Agroforestry systems of the lowland alluvial valleys of the tehuacan-cuicatlan biosphere reserve: an evaluation of their biocultural capacity
Conclusions: Maintenance of vegetation cover did not confront markedly with the intensive agricultural practices. It is possible the expansion and enrichment of vegetation in terraces and borders of AFS. Information available on plant species and local techniques is potentially useful for a regional program of biodiversity conservation considering AFS as keystones. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 19, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mariana VallejoAlejandro CasasEdgar Pérez-NegrónAna Moreno-CallesOmar Hernández-OrdoñezOswaldo TellezPatricia Dávila Source Type: research

Traditional plant use in Burkina Faso (West Africa): a national-scale analysis with focus on traditional medicine
Conclusions: The national-scale analysis revealed systematic patterns of traditional plant use throughout BFA. These results are of interest for applied research, as a detailed knowledge of traditional plant use can a) help to communicate conservation needs and b) facilitate future research on drug screening. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 19, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alexander ZizkaAdjima ThiombianoStefan DresslerBlandine NacoulmaAmadé OuédraogoIssaka OuédraogoOumarou OuédraogoGeorg ZizkaKaren HahnMarco Schmidt Source Type: research

Vernacular dominance in folk taxonomy: a case study of ethnospecies in medicinal plant trade in Tanzania
Conclusions: Middlemen, traders and vendors adapt their folk classifications to those of the ethnic groups of the region where they conduct their trade, and to the ethnicity of their main customers. The names in the language of the traders are not forgotten, but relegated in favor of the more salient names of the dominant tribe. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 19, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Joseph OtienoSiri AbihudiSarina VeldmanMichael NahashonTinde van AndelHugo de Boer Source Type: research

Wild edible plant species utilized by a subsistence farming community in Obalanga sub-county, Amuria district, Uganda
Conclusion: Disproportionate distribution of edible wild plant indigenous knowledge was noted in Obalanga with the lowest among the children. The marketed plant species in Obalanga can offer an opportunity for household livelihood diversification through value addition and trade under the umbrella of organic products. This will increase household incomes thereby contributing towards MDG 1 on eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. It is thus vital to document indigenous knowledge so that it is not lost as plant species disappear due to environmental degradation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 10, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Samuel OjelelEsezah Kakudidi Source Type: research

Local knowledge about fodder plants in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil
This study evaluated local knowledge of the fodder plants of the Caatinga in northeast Brazil (seasonal dry forest). Specifically, the goal was to catalog local knowledge regarding the use of native and exotic forage plants in two rural communities located in the state of Paraiba (northeast Brazil), to provide information for nutritional investigations and to verify how the knowledge of these resources is distributed. Methods: The communities were followed for three consecutive years, and interviews were conducted with 44 families (20 men and 24 women). Nine of these individuals were determined by the snowball technique to...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 10, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alissandra NunesReinaldo de LucenaMércia dos SantosUlysses Albuquerque Source Type: research

Medicinal use of wild fauna by mestizo communities living near San Guillermo Biosphere Reserve (San Juan, Argentina)
Conclusions: A low number of animal species was mentioned as used for medicinal purposes, which could be explained by the perception of strong control related the legislation that bans hunting and the erosion of traditional knowledge produced by mestizaje. However, the presence of a traditional medicine is deeply rooted in the community culture. Management strategy for protected areas should focus not only on the conservation and sustainability of biological resources, but also on the ancestral knowledge of local communities, such as the medicinal use of animals. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 21, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Jorge HernandezClaudia CamposCarlos Borghi Source Type: research

Evidence of a link between taboos and sacrifices and resource scarcity of ritual plants
Conclusions: These results prove the presence of a form of adaptive management where restrictions are related to resource scarcity and protection of ritual plant species. By providing baseline data on possibly endangered species, we demonstrate how plant use in the context of religious traditions can yield important information for conservation planning. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 8, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Diana QuirozTinde van Andel Source Type: research

Landscape ethnoecological knowledge base and management of ecosystem services in a Székely-Hungarian pre-capitalistic village system (Transylvania, Romania)
Conclusions: Based on explicit and implicit information, we argue that Székelys possessed detailed knowledge of the local ecological system. Moreover the world’s first known explicit mention of ecosystem services (“Benefits that are provided by Nature for free”) originated from this region from 1786. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Zsolt MolnárKrisztina GellényKatalin MargócziMarianna Biró Source Type: research

Wildlife use and the role of taboos in the conservation of wildlife around the Nkwende Hills Forest Reserve; South-west Cameroon
Conclusion: Like other communities living around forest areas, the studied communities use wildlife in their culture and tradition. Wildlife is not only used for consumption, but also for traditional medicines, craft materials and spiritual purposes. But, threats to wildlife and their traditional uses are real and acculturation seems to be the main driver. High priority should be given to the reconciling conservation of species with high values for local communities and human needs. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Kadiri BoboFodjou AghomoBonito Ntumwel Source Type: research

Landscape ethnoecological knowledge base and management of ecosystem services in a Szekely-Hungarian pre-capitalistic village system (Transylvania, Romania)
Conclusions: Based on explicit and implicit information, we argue that Szekelys possessed detailed knowledge of the local ecological system. Moreover the world's first known explicit mention of ecosystem services ("Benefits that are provided by Nature for free") originated from this region from 1786. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Zsolt MolnárKrisztina GellényKatalin MargócziMarianna Biró Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in the environs of Tara-gedam and Amba remnant forests of Libo Kemkem District, northwest Ethiopia
Conclusion: The diversity of medicinal plants and the associated indigenous knowledge of Tara-gedam and its environs are of a considerable value to the local community and beyond. There is, therefore, a need for conservation of the vegetation and the medicinal plants along with preservation of the wealth of the indigenous knowledge. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Getnet ChekoleZemede AsfawEnsermu Kelbessa Source Type: research

Ethnoecology of the palm Brahea dulcis (Kunth) Mart. in central Mexico
Conclusions: We propose that Brahea dulcis is the palm with the highest potential for sustainable use in the arid and semi-arid zones of Mexico. The challenge to improving management includes simplifying the legal protection framework, promoting uses and developing a market strategy. Collaborations to share experiences with peasant farmers from Guerrero is recommended. We further recommend the development of a governmental strategy to enhance and reassess this important resource. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 5, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: María PulidoMayte Coronel-Ortega Source Type: research

Local knowledge and exploitation of the avian fauna by a rural community in the semi-arid zone of northeastern Brazil
Conclusion: The evidence collected on the criteria applied by local specialists for the exploitation of the bird fauna permitted the identification of the species that suffer hunting pressure, providing guidelines for the development of conservation and management strategies that will guarantee the long-term survival of the populations of these bird species in the region. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 24, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Pedro TeixeiraThiago ThelJullio FerreiraSeverino JúniorWallace JúniorRachel Neves Source Type: research

Use of columnar cacti in the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico: perspectives for sustainable management of non-timber forest products
Conclusions: Combining forest extraction and agroforestry systems are ideal scenarios to sustainable fruit harvest programmes. In addition, fair commerce of transformed products would substantially favour goals of sustainable management. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 23, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Edgar Pérez-NegrónPatricia DávilaAlejandro Casas Source Type: research

Use of columnar cacti in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico: perspectives for sustainable management of non-timber forest products
Conclusions: Combining forest extraction and agroforestry systems are ideal scenarios to sustainable fruit harvest programmes. In addition, fair commerce of transformed products would substantially favour goals of sustainable management. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 23, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Edgar Pérez-NegrónPatricia DávilaAlejandro Casas Source Type: research

Comparative analysis of diversity and utilization of edible plants in arid and semi-arid areas in Benin
Conclusions: We conclude that if food security has to be addressed, the production and consumption policies must be re-oriented toward the recognition of the place of wild edible plants. For this to happen we suggest a number of policy and strategic decisions as well as research and development actions such as a thorough documentation of wild edible plants and their contribution to household diet, promotion of the ''bringing into cultivation" practices, strengthening of livestock-crop integration. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 23, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alcade SegnonEnoch Achigan-Dako Source Type: research

Not just minor wild edible forest products: consumption of pteridophytes in sub-Saharan Africa
Conclusion: This study demonstrated the capability of literature research to reveal traditional knowledge on edible pteridophytes in sub-Saharan Africa from dispersed primary ethnobotanical data. Findings from this study suggest that edible pteridophytes could make an important contribution to provision of macro and micro nutrients to the sub-Saharan African population. This study also provided evidence of the importance of pteridophytes as food sources, and can therefore, used to enhance food security in the region by complementing the major food crops, vegetables and fruits. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 22, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alfred Maroyi Source Type: research

Traditional health practitioners' perceptions, herbal treatment and management of HIV and related opportunistic infections
Conclusion: This study explored the THPs' perspectives on HIV and commonly associated OIs and their herbal treatment methods. THPs generally rely on biomedical diagnosis before treating a client. They also seek guidance from the ancestors for a particular diagnosis, the plants to use for a specific treatment, when to harvest, and how to administer herbal remedies. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 5, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Denver DavidsTarryn BlouwsOluwaseyi AboyadeDiana GibsonJoop De JongCharlotte Van¿t KloosterGail Hughes Source Type: research

Ethnomedicinal use of African pangolins by traditional medical practitioners in Sierra Leone
Conclusion: This study indicates a high importance value for pangolins as part of these communities' spiritual, cultural and medicinal beliefs. However, the numbers of individuals harvested from the wild remains unknown and unregulated even though pangolins have been listed under Schedule 2 of the Wildlife Conservation Act, 1972, of Sierra Leone, which prohibits any person from hunting or being in possession of pangolins. It is likely that this unregulated harvesting and poaching of this threatened species, for medicinal purposes, is unsustainable and there is an urgent need to determine pangolin population abundance withi...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 20, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Maxwell BoakyeDarren PietersenAntoinette KotzéDesiré DaltonRaymond Jansen Source Type: research

Traditional knowledge of wild food plants in a few Tibetan communities
Conclusion: Tibetans have traditionally exploited few wild food plants. These mainly compensate for the lack of vegetables and fruit in traditional Tibetan diet, notably among pastoralists, and are far more important during famines as substitutes for roasted barley flour. Today few wild food plants are regularly consumed, less in the main towns and villages and moreso in remote areas and among pastoralists. Younger generations from towns have almost lost traditional botanical knowledge. Owing to modernisation and globalisation processes, many local people have specialised in collecting natural products increasingly demande...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 3, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alessandro Boesi Source Type: research

Analysis of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants from residents in Gayasan National Park (Korea)
Conclusion: The results of the inter-network analysis will provide a suitable plan for sustainable preservation of the national park through a continued study of the data. Particular species of medicinal plants need to be protected for a balanced plant ecosystem within the park. Consequently, through further studies using these results, proper steps need to be established for preparing a wise alternative to create a sustainable natural plant ecosystem for Gayasan National Park and other national parks. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 21, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mi-Jang SongHyun KimByoung-Yoon LeeHeldenbrand BrianChan-Ho ParkChang-Woo Hyun Source Type: research

Depredation of domestic herds by pumas based on farmer¿s information in Southern Brazil
Conclusions: Deep changes in husbandry practices added to educational programs should be implemented, in order to maintain the sustainability of rural activities as well as the survival of pumas in southern Brazil. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Francine SchulzRodrigo PrintesLarissa Oliveira Source Type: research

Diversity of wetland plants used traditionally in China: a literature review
Conclusions: A diverse range of wetland plants, in terms of both taxonomic affiliation and type of use, have been used traditionally in China. Medicine, forage and food are the three most important categories of use, the plants providing basic resources used by local people in their everyday lives. Local availability is the main factor influencing which species are used. Quantitative indexes, especially Cultural Value Index, proved very useful for evaluating the usefulness of plants as recorded in the literature. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yin ZhangHualin XuHui ChenFei WangHuyin Huai Source Type: research

"Depredation of domestic herds by pumas based on farmer's information in Southern Brazil"
Conclusions: Deep changes in husbandry practices added to educational programs should be implemented, in order to maintain the sustainability of rural activities as well as the survival of pumas in southern Brazil. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Francine SchulzRodrigo PrintesLarissa Oliveira Source Type: research

Economic benefits of high value medicinal plants to Pakistani communities: an analysis of current practice and potential
Conclusions: Pakistan exports of high value plants generate over US$10.5 million annually in 2012, with a substantial percentage of the supply coming from Swat District, but its market share has been declining. Reasons for the decline were identified as unreliable and often poor quality of the material supplied, length of the supply chain, and poor marketing strategies. These problems can be addressed by improving the knowledge of those at the start of the supply chain, improving linkages among all steps in the chain, and developing sustainable harvesting practices. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 10, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hassan SherAli AldosariAhmad AliHugo de Boer Source Type: research

The river and the sea: fieldwork in human ecology and ethnobiology
This article is a commentary on the experiences that motivated my decision to become a human ecologist and ethnobiologist. These experiences include the pleasure of studying and of having the sense of being within nature, as well as the curiosity towards understanding the world and minds of local people. In particular, such understanding could be driven by addressing the challenging questions that originate in the interactions of such individuals with their natural surroundings. I have been particularly interested in the sea and the riverine forests that are inhabited by coastal or riverine small-scale fishers. Sharing the...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 2, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alpina Begossi Source Type: research

An ethnobotanical study of the less known wild edible figs (genus Ficus) native to Xishuangbanna, Southwest China
Conclusions: In comparison with reports from other parts of the world, ethnic groups in Xishuangbanna exploited more edible Ficus species for young leaves or leaf buds. Most of the edible species undergo a gradient of management intensities following a gradient of manipulation from simple field gathering to ex situ cultivation. This study contributes to our understanding of the origins and diffusion of the knowledge of perception, application and managing a group of particular plant species, and how the local culture, economic and geographical factors influence the process. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 24, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yinxian ShiHuabin HuYoukai XuAizhong Liu Source Type: research

Knowledge and use of edible mushrooms in two municipalities of the Sierra Tarahumara, Chihuahua, Mexico
Conclusion: The studied population shows a great appreciation towards five species, mainly the A. caesarea complex, and an apparent lack of knowledge of nearly 20 species which are used as food in other areas of Mexico. There are no apparent differences among Sierra inhabitants in terms of gender, occupation, or language regarding the recognition and consumption of species. The rejection of certain species is due mainly to fear of poisoning and the traditional selective teaching of families in the mountain communities of the Sierra Tarahumara. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 17, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Miroslava Quiñónez-MartínezFelipe Ruan-SotoIvonne Aguilar-MorenoFortunato Garza-OcañasToutcha Lebgue-KelengPablo Lavín-MurcioIrma Enríquez-Anchondo Source Type: research

Morphological variation, management and domestication of `maguey alto¿ (Agave inaequidens) and `maguey manso¿ (A. hookeri) in Michoacán, México
Conclusions: Divergence between wild and cultivated populations of A. inaequidens reflect artificial selection. A. hookeri is similar to the cultivated A. inaequidens, which supports the hypothesis that A. hookeri could be the extreme of a domestication gradient of a species complex. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 16, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carmen FigueredoAlejandro CasasPatricia Colunga-GarcíaMarínJafet NassarAntonio González-Rodríguez Source Type: research

Morphological variation, management and domestication of 'maguey alto' (Agave inaequidens) and 'maguey manso' (A. hookeri) in Michoacan, Mexico
Conclusions: Divergence between wild and cultivated populations of A. inaequidens reflect artificial selection. A. hookeri is similar to the cultivated A. inaequidens, which supports the hypothesis that A. hookeri could be the extreme of a domestication gradient of a species complex. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 16, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carmen FigueredoAlejandro CasasPatricia Colunga-GarcíaMarínJafet NassarAntonio González-Rodríguez Source Type: research

Common opossum (Didelphis marsupialis Linnaeus, 1758): food and medicine for people in the Amazon
Conclusions: D. marsupialis is an important source of protein for riverine communities in the region studied. Its fat is used as a traditional medicine and it is indicated for many types of diseases. Although the species concerned is treated with hostility in various Brazilian regions, in the case of Abaetetuba this animal is strongly prized due to the good quality of its meat. However, despite the value assigned to the species, its consumption should be the subject of further studies, as this marsupial species has been described as a reservoir for parasites that cause severe diseases. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 10, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Flávio BarrosPierre de Aguiar Azevedo Source Type: research

Distribution, abundance and traditional management of Agave potatorum in the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico: bases for sustainable use of non-timber forest products
Conclusions: Strategies for protecting particular populations, temporal substitution of agave species for mescal production, implementation of restoration and organization for fear commerce are needed for improving sustainable use of A. potatorum. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 3, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: América Delgado-LemusAlejandro CasasOswaldo Téllez Source Type: research

Distribution, abundance and traditional management of Agave potatorum in the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico: bases for sustainable use of non-timber forest products
Conclusions: Strategies for protecting particular populations, temporal substitution of agave species for mescal production, implementation of restoration and organization for fear commerce are needed for improving sustainable use of A. potatorum. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 3, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: América Delgado-LemusAlejandro CasasOswaldo Téllez Source Type: research

Ethnobotany in Rayones, Nuevo León, México
Conclusions: Knowing their medicinal uses is an important issue for the people of Rayones. Boiling and preparing infusions are the main ways of using plants by residents. The leaves, the branches, and the fruits are the most commonly used parts. Almost 18% of the flora is used for wood and construction purposes. Several uses such as cosmetic, shampoo, firming skin tonics and health hair products recorded in Rayones has not been reported for other areas in the state of Nuevo Leon. In Rayones, women have a greater knowledge about plants and their uses than men, particularly, medicinal plants, but, men have a greater knowledg...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 1, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Eduardo Estrada-CastillónMiriam Garza-LópezJosé Villarreal-QuintanillaMaría Salinas-RodríguezBrianda Soto-MataHumberto González-RodríguezDino González-UribeIsrael Cantú-SilvaArtemio Carrillo-ParraCésar Cantú-Ayala Source Type: research

Medicinal plants in the cultural landscape of a Mapuche-Tehuelche community in arid Argentine Patagonia: an eco-sensorial approach
Conclusions: Hebal landscape perceived by the community exhibits notable eco sensorial and spatial heterogeneity. Local inhabitants' sensorial interpretations play a role as heuristic tools in the recreation and redefinition of old and new available resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 26, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Soledad MolaresAna Ladio Source Type: research

Traditional uses of plants in a rural community of Mozambique and possible links with Miombo degradation and harvesting sustainability
Conclusions: This study shows that the communities investigated rely heavily on local forest products for their daily subsistence requirements in food, firewood/charcoal and building materials. However, over-exploitation and destructive collection seem to threaten the survival of some of the woody species used. A sustainable approach including the involvement of local communities in the management of woody species is recommended. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 23, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Piero BruschiMatteo ManciniElisabetta MattioliMichela MorgantiMaria Adele Signorini Source Type: research

Ritual uses of palms in traditional medicine in sub-Saharan Africa: a review
Palms (Arecaceae) are prominent elements in African traditional medicines. It is, however, a challenge to find detailed information on the ritual use of palms, which are an inextricable part of African medicinal and spiritual systems. This work reviews ritual uses of palms within African ethnomedicine. We studied over 200 publications on uses of African palms and found information about ritual uses in 26 of them. At least 12 palm species in sub-Saharan Africa are involved in various ritual practices: Borassus aethiopum, Cocos nucifera, Dypsis canaliculata, D. fibrosa, D. pinnatifrons, Elaeis guineensis, Hyphaene coriacea, ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 23, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marta GrucaTinde van AndelHenrik Balslev Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical and economic value of Ravenala madagascariensis Sonn. in Eastern Madagascar
Conclusions: Ravenala madagascariensis is very important to the Ambalabe communities because for local population, it represents the Betsimisaraka cultural and traditional use of the plant for house building. Moreover, none of its parts are discarded. The harvest and sale of R. madagascariensis for building materials can also provide an additional source of income to the family. Besides, using Ravenala in house construction reduces the use of slow growing trees and contributes to the sustainable use of natural forest resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 15, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Nivo RakotoariveloAina RazanatsimaFortunat RakotoarivonyLucien RasoavietyAro RamarosandratanaVololoniaina JeannodaAlyse KuhlmanArmand RandrianasoloRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Anti-mosquito plants as an alternative or incremental method for malaria vector control among rural communities of Bagamoyo District, Tanzania
Conclusion: This survey has indicated some knowledge gap among community members in managing mosquito vectors using plant. The communities need a basic health education and sensitization for effective exploitation of this valuable tool for reducing mosquitoes and associated disease burdens. On the other hand, the government of Tanzania should strengthen advocacy of botanical pesticides development, registration and regulation for public health benefits because they are source of pest control tools people rely on them. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 11, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ester InnocentAhmed HassanaliWilliam KisinzaPrince MutalemwaStephen MagesaEdmund Kayombo Source Type: research

Ethnotaxonomy of birds by the inhabitants of Pedra Branca Village, Santa Teresinha municipality, Bahia state, Brazil
Conclusions: The ethno-ornithological research in Pedra Branca Village has contributed with new information on popular nomenclature of birds and their etymology, showing that folk knowledge on birds is conveyed within the community. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 10, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ana Galvagne LossEraldo Costa NetoCaio MachadoFernando Flores Source Type: research

¿Shark is the man!¿: ethnoknowledge of Brazil¿s South Bahia fishermen regarding shark behaviors
Conclusions: This work demonstrates the complexity and robustness of artisanal fishermen's ichthyological knowledge of sharks. Therefore, we suggest that such knowledge should be considered to develop public policies for the control of the fishing activity, as well as to develop and consolidate the National Action Plan for the Conservation of Shark and Ray Species (PAN - Tubaroes e Raias). (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 3, 2014 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Márcio Luiz Barbosa-FilhoAlexandre SchiavettiDaniela AlarconEraldo Costa-Neto Source Type: research