Influence of traditional markets on plant management in the Tehuacan Valley
Conclusion: Spatial distribution and plant parts used are particularly meaningful factors determining risk and influencing management actions on edible plant species interchanged in the region. Limited or inexistent management may favor extinction of local populations under risk. Local management techniques synthesize knowledge and experiences crucial for designing sustainable management programs. Traditional management techniques supported by ecological information and environmental management approaches could make valuable contributions for sustainable use of plant species, particularly those becoming economically import...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 1, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yaayé ArellanesAlejandro CasasAnselmo ArellanesErnesto VegaJosé BlancasMariana VallejoIgnacio TorresSelene Rangel-LandaAna MorenoLeonor SolísEdgar Pérez-Negrón Source Type: research

Peril in the market-classification and dosage of species used as anti-diabetics in Lima, Peru
Background: Peru is what Peruvian anthropologist Lupe Camino calls the "health axis" of the old Central Andean culture area stretching from Ecuador to Bolivia. In particular in the North of the country the traditional use of medicinal dates back as far as the first millennium B.C. Both healers, and the wider population, often buy their medicinal plants in local markets, but there is very little comparative information available about which plants are sold under which vernacular name at any given time, for which indication, and which dosage information and information about side effects is given by vendors. For th...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 30, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Rainer BussmannNarel ZambranaMarinoli ChamorroNatalia MoreiraMaría del Rosario Cuadros NegriJose Olivera Source Type: research

Evaluation of the degree of mycophilia-mycophobia among highland and lowland inhabitants from Chiapas, Mexico
This study questioned whether mycophilia and mycophobia are indeed related to ecological regions through the evaluation of 19 indicators tested in the highlands and lowlands of Chiapas, Mexico. Methods: The heterogeneity of attitudes toward mushrooms was explored in terms of ecological region and sociocultural variables. Information was obtained through structured interviews in 10 communities in Los Altos de Chiapas (highlands) and the Selva Lacandona (lowlands). We analyzed indicators separately through chi2 tests and multivariate techniques. The Mycophilia-Mycophobia Index was also used in the analysis. To assess which f...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 26, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Felipe Ruan-SotoJavier CaballeroCarlos MartorellJoaquín CifuentesAlma González-EsquincaRoberto Garibay-Orijel Source Type: research

Learning to hunt Crocodiles: social organization in the process of knowledge generation and the emergence of management practices among Mayan of Mexico
Conclusions: In agreement to the hypothesis proposed, the Mayan used multiple learning paths to develop a new activity: the lagarto hunting. On the one hand, they used their traditional social organization structure as well as their culturally inherited knowledge. On the other hand, they acquired new ecological knowledge of the species in a learning-by-doing process, together with the use of other sources of external information.The formation of working groups, the exchange of information and the administration of hunting locations are similar to other productive activities and livelihood practiced by these Mayan. Skills s...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Fernando ZamudioEduardo Bello-BaltazarErin Estrada-Lugo Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical knowledge on indigenous fruits in Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions in Northern Namibia
Conclusions: The local communities in Oshikoto and Ohangwena regions have relatively good knowledge and practices regarding the indigenous fruit. This study enhances our understanding on the indigenous fruit in Namibia and their uses by local communities. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 22, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ahmad CheikhyoussefWerner Embashu Source Type: research

Ethnobotanic importance of plants used in pigeon-breeding in Eastern Spain
Conclusions: Pigeon breeding is an immensely popular activity in Eastern Spain, and ethnobiological knowledge about breeding pigeons and caring for them is considerable. The names and traditional uses of plants depend on their geographical location, vernacular names serve as an intangible heritage. Feeding, environmental features, and genetic makeup of individuals are relevant aspects in the maintenance of avian health. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 20, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Antonio BeldaCarolina CortésVictoriano Peiró Source Type: research

Ethno-medicinal study of plants used for treatment of human and livestock ailments by traditional healers in South Omo, Southern Ethiopia
Conclusion: This study showed that traditional medicine, mainly involving the use of medicinal plants, is playing a significant role in meeting the primary healthcare needs of the three ethnic groups. Acceptance of traditional medicine and limited access to modern healthcare facilities could be considered as the main factors for the continuation of the practice. Documented knowledge of the traditional healers can be used to support the country's human and livestock health care system and improve lives and livelihoods. Information generated will be used in future studies to validate bioactivity of selected medicinal plants ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ketema TolossaEtana DebelaSpiridoula AthanasiadouAdugna ToleraGebeyehu GangaJos Houdijk Source Type: research

Traditional use of medicinal plants in south-central Zimbabwe: review and perspectives
Conclusion: This study illustrates the importance of traditional medicines in the treatment and management of human diseases and ailments in south-central Zimbabwe. Traditional medicines still play an important role in meeting basic health care of local communities in Zimbabwe. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 4, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alfred Maroyi Source Type: research

Annual acknowledgement of manuscript reviewers
Contributing reviewersThe editors of Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 8 (2012). (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 29, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Andrea PieroniLucy Abel Source Type: research

Wild plant folk nomenclature of the Mongol herdsmen in the Arhorchin national nature reserve, inner Mongolia, PR China
Conclusion: In the corresponding rate between plant folk names and scientific names yielded a computational correspondence of 82.19%, which can be considered as a high level of consistency between scientific knowledge and traditional knowledge in botanical nomenclature. Primary names have most cultural significance in the plant folk names. Special characteristic of plant folk names were focused on the physical characteristics of animals which were closely related to their traditional animal husbandry and environment. Plant folk names are not only a code to distinguish between different plant species, but also a kind of cul...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Soyolt ¿Galsannorbu ¿Yongping ¿Wunenbayar ¿Guohou LiuKhasbagan ¿ Source Type: research

The socio-cultural importance of Mauritia flexuosa palm swamps (aguajales) and implications for multi-use management in two Maijuna communities of the Peruvian Amazon
Conclusions: In order to meet the multiple socio-cultural and economic needs of the Maijuna, sustainable management efforts must be expanded to not only focus on the commercial harvest of aguaje but also other facets of their relationship with this habitat. Our study suggests that the research and development of multi-use forest management plans must not be restricted to commercial forest products and ecosystem services given that many communities rely on tropical forests for a wide range of non-market cultural, economic, and subsistence goods and services. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 22, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Michael GilmoreBryan EndressChrista Horn Source Type: research

Eating from the wild: diversity of wild edible plants used by Tibetans in Shangri-la region, Yunnan, China
Conclusion: Wild food plants species are abundant and diverse in Shangri-la region. They provide food and nutrients to local people and could also be a source of cash income. However, both WEPs and their associated indigenous knowledge are facing various threats. Thus, conservation and sustainable utilization of these plants in this area are of the utmost importance. Documentation of these species may provide basic information for conservation, possibly further exploitation, and will preserve local traditional knowledge. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 19, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yan JuJingxian ZhuoBo LiuChunlin Long Source Type: research

The utilization and management of plant resources in rural areas of the Limpopo Province, South Africa
Conclusion: The current study concluded that plant resources still play an important role in the surveyed rural areas of the Limpopo Province. Furthermore, for sustainable utilization and long-term conservation of plants in these areas the government should assist communities in the management of their plant resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marula RasetheSebua SemenyaMartin PotgieterAlfred Maroyi Source Type: research

Diversity and use of ethno-medicinal plants in the region of Swat, North Pakistan
Conclusion: Medicinal plants are still widely used for treatment in the area of Swat. Some species of woodlands seem to be adapted to wood-pasture, but vulnerable to overcollecting, and in particular to deforestation. It is suggested to implement local small-scaled agroforestry systems to cultivate vulnerable and commercially valuable ethno-medicinal woodland plants under local self-government responsibility. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 15, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Naveed AkhtarAbdur RashidWaheed MuradErwin Bergmeier Source Type: research

Wild food plants and wild edible fungi in two valleys of the Qinling Mountains (Shaanxi, central China)
Background: The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants in two mountain valleys separated by Mount Taibai -- the highest peak of northern China and one of its biodiversity hotspots, each adjacent to species-rich temperate forest vegetation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 15, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yongxiang Kang¿ukasz ¿uczajJin KangShijiao Zhang Source Type: research

Medicinal plants, traditional medicine, markets and management in far-west Nepal
Conclusion: Medicinal plants are inseparable from local livelihoods because they have long been collected, consumed, and managed through local customs and knowledge. Management of traditional therapies is urged, because the therapies are empirically and knowledge based, often culturally inherited and important to pharmacology and local livelihoods. However, traditional therapies are currently being eroded due to changing lifestyles, perceptions, social transformations, and acculturation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 12, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ripu KunwarLaxmi MahatRam AcharyaRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Use and valuation of native and introduced medicinal plant species in Campo Hermoso and Zetaquira, Boyacá, Colombia
Conclusions: The high proportion of introduced plant species used in the local traditional medicines is similar to the results of a number of other ethnobotanical studies and emphasise the need for efforts to record and maintain traditional knowledge on native species. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 11, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ana Cadena-GonzálezMarten SørensenIda Theilade Source Type: research

One century later: the folk botanical knowledge of the last remaining Albanians of the upper Reka Valley, Mount Korab, Western Macedonia
Background: Ethnobotanical surveys of the Western Balkans are important for the cross-cultural study of local plant knowledge and also for obtaining baseline data, which is crucial for fostering future rural development and eco-tourism initiatives in the region. The current ethnobotanical field study was conducted among the last remaining Albanians inhabiting the upper Reka valley at the base of Mount Korab in the Mavrovo National Park of the Republic of Macedonia.The aims of the study were threefold: 1) to document local knowledge pertaining to plants; 2) to compare these findings with those of an ethnographic account wri...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 11, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Andrea PieroniBesnik RexhepiAnely NedelchevaAvni HajdariBehxhet MustafaValeria KolosovaKevin CianfaglioneCassandra Quave Source Type: research

Use and valuation of native and introduced medicinal plant species in Campo Hermoso and Zetaquira, Boyaca, Colombia
Conclusions: The high proportion of introduced plant species used in the local traditional medicines is similar to the results of a number of other ethnobotanical studies and emphasise the need for efforts to record and maintain traditional knowledge on native species. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 11, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ana Cadena-GonzálezMarten SørensenIda Theilade Source Type: research

Wild edible plants of Belarus: from Rostafi¿ski¿s questionnaire of 1883 to the present
Conclusion: The responses to Rostafiński from 1883 present extremely valuable historical material as the use of wild food plants in Belarus has since undergone drastic changes, similar to those, which have taken place in other Eastern European countries. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 4, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: ¿ukasz ¿uczajPiotr KöhlerEwa Piro¿nikowMaja GraniszewskaAndrea PieroniTanya Gervasi Source Type: research

Wild edible plants of Belarus: from Rostafinski's questionnaire of 1883 to the present
Conclusion: The responses to Rostafinski from 1883 present extremely valuable historical material as the use of wild food plants in Belarus has since undergone drastic changes, similar to those, which have taken place in other Eastern European countries. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 4, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: ¿ukasz ¿uczajPiotr KöhlerEwa Piro¿nikowMaja GraniszewskaAndrea PieroniTanya Gervasi Source Type: research

Comparative ethnoentomology of edible stinkbugs in southern Africa and sustainable management considerations
: Insects, such as stinkbugs, are able to produce noxious defence chemicals to ward off predators, nevertheless, some ethnic groups have recipes to render them delicious. We provide an example of edible stinkbugs (Encosternum delegorguei) used by two locally separate ethnic groups in South Africa, the Vhavenda and Mapulana, with a third group, the Bolobedu using them for commercial purposes. Structured interview schedules and observations with 106 harvesters were conducted to determine differences in use, nomenclature and oral history, methods of collection and preparation as well as perceptions pertaining to availability....
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 25, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Catherine Maria DzerefosEd Tadeusz Fernando WitkowskiRob Toms Source Type: research

Medicinal and useful plants in the tradition of Rotonda, Pollino National Park, Southern Italy
Conclusions: Data obtained showed that in the studied area the folk use of plants is alive and still derives from daily practice. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 23, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Paola Di SanzoLaura De MartinoEmilia ManciniVincenzo De Feo Source Type: research

A cross sectional survey of knowledge, attitude and practices related to house flies among dairy farmers in Punjab, Pakistan
Conclusion: The present ethnoentomological survey provides information about knowledge, attitude and practices of dairy farmers related to house flies in Punjab, Pakistan. We conclude that the farmers' education level and knowledge of the breeding sites had a positive association with the adoption of prevention practices against house flies. The study also highlights the need of targeting the lack of knowledge of dairy farmers for the successful management of house flies. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 19, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hafiz KhanWaseem AkramSarfraz ShadMuhammad RazaqUnsar Naeem-UllahKhuram Zia Source Type: research

Ethnotaxonomical considerations and usage of ichthyofauna in a fishing community in Ceará State, Northeast Brazil
Conclusions: The results stress the richness and complexity of the knowledge of the artisanal fishermen of Redonda Beach, and they provide support for the possibility of future studies and for the development of management plans and the management of wildlife resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 8, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Márcia PintoJosé MourãoRômulo Alves Source Type: research

Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil
Conclusions: Monitoring of spawning areas, preservation of traditional practices, strategies to moderate the use of fishery resources and the local ecological knowledge/attitudes can provide data to improve the conservation practices and management of sea turtles. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 1, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Heitor BragaAlexandre Schiavetti Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical appraisal and medicinal use of plants in Patriata, New Murree, Evidence from Pakistan
Conclusions: The study revealed that most of the plants are used for medicinal and fodder purposes. The results of Logit Model showed that the probabilities of plant species for their medicinal use are associated to the woody or non-woody, aerial or underground, perennial or annual characteristics of plants. One should be careful in completely generalizing the results as the survey findings are sensitive to the plant species and the vegetation under consideration. But it can be specified that there exists either some positive or negative association of medicinal use of plants to the various characteristics of plant species...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 27, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ejaz AhmedMuhammad ArshadAbdul SaboorRahmatullah QureshiGhazala MustafaShumaila SadiqSunbal Chaudhari Source Type: research

Ethno-ornithology and conservation of wild birds in the semi-arid Caatinga of northeastern Brazil
The utilization of birds as pets has been recognized as one of the principal threats to global avifauna. Most of the information about the use and sale of birds as pets has been limited to areas of high biodiversity and whose impacts of anthropic actions have been widely broadcast internationally, for example for the Amazon Forest and forest remnants of Southeast Asia. The Caatinga predominates in the semi-arid region of Brazil, and is one of the semi-arid biomes with the greatest biological diversity in the world, where 511 species of birds exist. Many of these birds are used as pets, a common practice in the region, whic...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 27, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Rômulo AlvesRailson LeiteWedson SoutoDandara BezerraAlan Loures-Ribeiro Source Type: research

Recollections, reflections, and revelations: ethnobiologists and their "First Time" in the field
For nearly a century, ethnobiologists have collaborated with local community members in their efforts to document and safeguard our planet's rich and varied biocultural heritage. Work in ethnobiology and ethnomedicine, including ethnobotany, ethnozoology, and ethnoecology, necessarily entails meticulous and rigrous systematic observation of the myriad ways indigenous and local communities cognize, utilize, and classify the floral and faunal resources on which they depend for survival.Every few months the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine will begin to offer editorials drafted by several international ethnobiologist...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 20, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Justin NolanAndrea Pieroni Source Type: research

Multidimensionality and scale in a landscape ethnoecological partitioning of a mountainous landscape (gyimes, eastern Carpathians, Romania)
Conclusions: Csango habitat categories were not organized into a single hierarchy, and the partitioning was multidimensional. Multidimensional description of habitats, made the nuanced characterization of plant species' habitats possible by providing innumerable possibilities to combine the most salient habitat features. We conclude that multidimensionality of landscape partitioning and the number of dimensions applied in a landscape seem to depend on the number of key habitat gradients in the given landscape. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 6, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Babai DánielMolnár Zsolt Source Type: research

Phenology of Spondias tuberosa Arruda (Anacardiaceae) under different landscape management regimes and a proposal for a rapid phenological diagnosis using local knowledge
Conclusion: The main conclusion of this study is the use of traditional knowledge as interesting tool for rapid phenological diagnosis. However further studies need to be developed to test this tool in other environments and cultural contexts. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 31, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ernani NetoAlyson AlmeidaNivaldo PeroniCibele CastroUlysses Albuquerque Source Type: research

Plants used in artisanal fisheries on the Western Mediterranean coasts of Italy
Conclusions: Our research correlates functional characteristics of the plants used in artisanal fishery and habitats, and discusses the distribution of these uses. This research is the first comprehensive outline of plant role in artisanal fisheries and traditional fishery knowledge in the Mediterranean, specifically in Italy. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 28, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Valentina SavoArianna La RoccaGiulia CanevaFabio RapalloLaura Cornara Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical study of plants used in management of livestock health problems by Afar people of Ada¿ar District, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia
Conclusion: The study revealed that there is still rich knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine in Ada'ar District. There was no habit of cultivating medicinal plants by people in the study area. Efforts, should, therefore, be made to protect these medicinal plants from further depletion, especially those that are scarcely availabale. Better attention should be given to medicinal plants with the highest fidelity level values as such values could indicate potencies of the plants. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 23, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mirutse GidayTilahun Teklehaymanot Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical study of plants used in management of livestock health problems by Afar people of Ada'ar District, Afar Regional State, Ethiopia
Conclusion: The study revealed that there is still rich knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine in Ada'ar District. There was no habit of cultivating medicinal plants by people in the study area. Efforts, should, therefore, be made to protect these medicinal plants from further depletion, especially those that are scarcely availabale. Better attention should be given to medicinal plants with the highest fidelity level values as such values could indicate potencies of the plants. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 23, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mirutse GidayTilahun Teklehaymanot Source Type: research

Ethno-entomological observations from North Korea (officially known as the ¿Democratic People¿s Republic of Korea¿)
In terms of scientific activities generally and ethnobiological pursuits in particular, North Korea, officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is an almost blank entity on the quilt of global research. During a sabbatical semester at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology the author used this opportunity to gather some information on the uses of insect and other terrestrial arthropods as human food and components of traditional healing methods in that country. Despite the widely publicised shortcomings in the supply of food stuffs to the population of North Korea, insects are not generally seen...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: V Meyer-Rochow Source Type: research

Ethno-entomological observations from North Korea (officially known as the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea")
In terms of scientific activities generally and ethnobiological pursuits in particular, North Korea, officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is an almost blank entity on the quilt of global research. During a sabbatical semester at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology the author used this opportunity to gather some information on the uses of insect and other terrestrial arthropods as human food and components of traditional healing methods in that country. Despite the widely publicised shortcomings in the supply of food stuffs to the population of North Korea, insects are not generally seen...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: V Meyer-Rochow Source Type: research

A resource management scenario for traditional and scientific management of pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus paulensis) in the Patos Lagoon estuary (RS), Brazil
Conclusions: The commensurable and the incommensurable levels reveal different basis of time-space perceptions between traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge. Despite incommensurability at the management level, it is possible to establish guidelines for the construction of "management scenarios" and to support a co-management process. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 11, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Gustavo MouraDaniela KalikoskiAntonio Diegues Source Type: research

Medicinal flora and ethnoecological knowledge in the Naran Valley, Western Himalaya, Pakistan
Mountain ecosystems all over the world support a high biological diversity and provide home and services to some 12% of the global human population, who use their traditional ecological knowledge to utilise local natural resources. The Himalayas are the world's youngest, highest and largest mountain range and support a high plant biodiversity. Due to their remote location, harsh climate, rough terrain and topography, many areas within this region still remain poorly known for its floristic diversity, plant species distribution and vegetation ecosystem service. The Naran valley in the north-western Pakistan is among such va...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 10, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Shujaul KhanSue PageHabib AhmadHamayun ShaheenZahid UllahMushtaq AhmadDavid Harper Source Type: research

'Everybody knows', but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara
Conclusions: The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 10, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Gabriele VolpatoAntonello Di NardoDavide RossiSaleh SalehAlessandro Broglia Source Type: research

Birds and people in semiarid northeastern Brazil: symbolic and medicinal relationships
Conclusions: The accumulated folk knowledge, beliefs, and practices involving the avifauna in the semiarid region of Brazil, whether symbolic or medicinal, demonstrated the cultural importance of this vertebrate group to local human populations and revealed a belief system intrinsically related to cynegetic practices in the region. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 8, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dandara BezerraHelder de AraujoÂngelo AlvesRômulo Alves Source Type: research

Wild vegetable mixes sold in the markets of Dalmatia (southern Croatia)
Conclusions: The rich tradition of eating many wild greens may result both from strong Venetian and Greek influences and the necessity of using all food resources available in the barren, infertile land in the past. Although the number of wild-collected green vegetables is impressive we hypothesize that it may have decreased over the years, and that further in-depth local ethnobotanical studies are needed in Dalmatia to record the disappearing knowledge of edible plants. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 3, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: ¿ukasz ¿uczajMarijana Zovko-Kon¿i¿Tihomir Mili¿evi¿Katija DolinaMarija Pand¿a Source Type: research

Ecological status and traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary of Garhwal Himalaya, India
Conclusion: The present study documented the traditional use of medicinal plants, their ecological status and importance of these plants in the largest protected area of Garhwal Himalaya. This study can serve as baseline information on medicinal plants and could be helpful to further strengthen the conservation of this important resource. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 2, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Jahangeer BhatMunesh KumarRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Medicinal plants in an urban environment: the medicinal flora of Banares Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh
Varanasi is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities of the world, and one of the most important Hindu pilgrimage sites. Despite this importance, very little information exits on the cities flora in gen... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 8, 2007 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Archana K Verma, Munesh Kumar and Rainer W Bussmann Source Type: research

Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine – achievements and perspectives
Last summer we officially launched the Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, published by BioMedCentral, with the aim of establishing a serious, peer-reviewed, open-access online journal that focuses on the ... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 7, 2006 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Andrea Pieroni Source Type: research

Urinary diseases and ethnobotany among pastoral nomads in the Middle East
This article is derived from a broad, twenty-year study of ethnobotany and folk medicine among pastoral nomads in the Middle East which took place from 1984 to 2004. The article presents examples of different ... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 2, 2005 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Aref Abu-Rabia Source Type: research

Welcome to Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
Ethnobiology is a multidisciplinary field of study that draws on approaches and methods from both the social and biological sciences. Ethnobiology aims at investigating culturally based biological and environm... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 29, 2005 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Andrea Pieroni, Lisa Leimar Price and Ina Vandebroek Source Type: research