Botanical ethnoveterinary therapies in three districts of the Lesser Himalayas of Pakistan
Conclusion: The current survey shows a remarkable resilience of ethnoveterinary botanical knowledge in the study area. Most of the species reported for ethnoveterinary applications are wild and under threat. Thus, not only is it imperative to conserve traditional local knowledge of folk veterinary therapies for bio-cultural conservation motives, but also to assist with in-situ and ex-situ environmental conservation initiatives, which are urgently needed. Future studies which focus on the validation of efficacy for use of these ethnoveterinary remedies can help to substantiate emic concepts regarding the management of anima...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 20, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Arshad AbbasiShujaul KhanMushtaq AhmadMir KhanCassandra QuaveAndrea Pieroni Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical survey of cooling herbal drinks from southern China
Conclusions: The liang cha industry of southern China reflects the plant species richness and cultural diversity of the region. Future research on safety and efficacy of herbal drinks as well as ecological and cultural conservation efforts are needed for the sustainable growth of China's botanical industry. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 19, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yujing LiuSelena AhmedChunlin Long Source Type: research

Alternative ways of representing Zapotec and Cuicatec folk classification of birds: a multidimensional model and its implications for culturally-informed conservation in Oaxaca, México
We report on a comparative ethno-ornithological study of Zapotec and Cuicatec communities in Northern Oaxaca, Mexico that provided a challenge to some existing descriptions of folk classification. Our default model was the taxonomic system of ranks developed by Brent Berlin. Methods: Fieldwork was conducted in the Zapotec village of San Miguel Tiltepec and in the Cuicatec village of San Juan Teponaxtla, using a combination of ethnographic interviews and pile-sorting tests. Post-fieldwork, Principal Component Analysis using NTSYSpc V. 2.11f was applied to obtain pattern variation for the answers from different participants....
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 9, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Graciela Alcántara-SalinasRoy EllenLeopoldo Valiñas-CoallaJavier CaballeroArturo Argueta-Villamar Source Type: research

Alternative ways of representing Zapotec and Cuicatec folk classification of birds: a multidimensional model and its implications for culturally-informed conservation in Oaxaca, Mexico
We report on a comparative ethno-ornithological study of Zapotec and Cuicatec communities in Northern Oaxaca, Mexico that provided a challenge to some existing descriptions of folk classification. Our default model was the taxonomic system of ranks developed by Brent Berlin. Methods: Fieldwork was conducted in the Zapotec village of San Miguel Tiltepec and in the Cuicatec village of San Juan Teponaxtla, using a combination of ethnographic interviews and pile-sorting tests. Post-fieldwork, Principal Component Analysis using NTSYSpc V. 2.11f was applied to obtain pattern variation for the answers from different participants....
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 9, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Graciela Alcántara-SalinasRoy EllenLeopoldo Valiñas-CoallaJavier Caballero-NietoArturo Argueta-Villamar Source Type: research

Common sense: folk wisdom that ethnobiological and ethnomedical research cannot afford to ignore
Common sense [CS], especially that of the non-scientist, can have predictive power to identify promising research avenues, as humans anywhere on Earth have always looked for causal links to understand, shape and control the world around them. CS is based on the experience of many individuals and is thus believed to hold some truths. Outcomes predicted by CS are compatible with observations made by whole populations and have survived tests conducted by a plethora of non-scientists. To explore our claim, we provide 4 examples of empirical insights (relevant to probably all ethnic groups on Earth) into causal phenomena predic...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - December 2, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Thomas ErrenMelissa KochV Meyer-Rochow Source Type: research

Knowledge, use and management of native wild edible plants from a seasonal dry forest (NE, Brazil)
Conclusion: Because conservation of the species is not endangered by their use but by deforestation of the ecosystems in which these plants grow, we suggest that the promotion and consumption of the plants by community members is convenient and thereby stimulates the appropriation and consequent protection of the ecosystem. To promote consumption of these plants, it is important to begin by teaching people about plant species that can be used for their alimentation, disproving existing myths about plant use, and encouraging diversification of use by motivating the invention of new preparation methods. An example of how thi...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 26, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Margarita CruzNivaldo PeroniUlysses Albuquerque Source Type: research

Indigenous and traditional plants: South African parents¿ knowledge, perceptions and uses and their children¿s sensory acceptance
Conclusion: These results look promising for the promotion of ITPs as a strategy to reduce malnutrition in rural farm communities and for potential inclusion of these micronutrient-rich ALVs in school feeding programmes to improve the nutritional status of children. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 25, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marinka van der HoevenJennifer OseiMinrie GreeffAnnamarie KrugerMieke FaberCornelius Smuts Source Type: research

Indigenous and traditional plants: South African parents' knowledge, perceptions and uses and their children's sensory acceptance
Conclusion: These results look promising for the promotion of ITPs as a strategy to reduce malnutrition in rural farm communities and for potential inclusion of these micronutrient-rich ALVs in school feeding programmes to improve the nutritional status of children. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 25, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marinka van der HoevenJennifer OseiMinrie GreeffAnnamarie KrugerMieke FaberCornelius Smuts Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical assessment of plant resources of Banda Daud Shah, District Karak, Pakistan
Conclusion: The investigated area is rural in nature and the inhabitants are highly dependent on the native plants for their health care needs and other requirements like fuel wood and fodder due to financial constraints and unavailability of resources. Medicinal plants for high ranked diseases may be phtyochemicaly and pharmacologically investigated to prove their efficacy. The local medicinal flora is facing overexploitation, overgrazing and improper way of collection. Proper conservation strategies such as controlled grazing, reforestation and rangeland management among many others may be adopted to promote the sustaina...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 22, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Waheed MuradAzizullah AzizullahMuhammad AdnanAkash TariqKalim KhanSaqib WaheedAshfaq Ahmad Source Type: research

Evidence of the shifting baseline syndrome in ethnobotanical research
Discussion and conclusions: The general perception of knowledge loss among young people when comparing ethnobotanical repertoires among different age groups should be analyzed with caution. Changes in the landscape or in the abundance of plant resources may be associated with changes in ethnobotanical repertoires held by people of different age groups. Also, the relationship between the availability of resources and current plant use practices rely on a complexity of factors. Fluctuations in these variables can cause changes in the reference (baseline) of different generations and consequently be responsible for differenen...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 14, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Natalia HanazakiDannieli HerbstMel MarquesIna Vandebroek Source Type: research

Phenotypic differentiation between wild and domesticated varieties of Crescentia cujete L. and culturally relevant uses of their fruits as bowls in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
Background: Selection criteria are important for analyzing domestication of perennial plant species, which experience a selection pressure throughout several human generations. We analyze the preferred morphological characteristics of Crescentia cujete fruits, which are used as bowls by the Maya of Yucatan, according to the uses they are given and the phenotypic consequences of artificial selection between one wild and three domesticated varieties. Methods: We performed 40 semi-structured interviews in seven communities. We calculated Sutrop's salience index (S) of five classes of ceremonial and daily life uses, and of eac...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 14, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Xitlali Aguirre-DuguaEdgar Pérez-NegrónAlejandro Casas Source Type: research

Plant management and biodiversity conservation in Náhuatl homegardens of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico
Conclusion: Homegardens provide a high diversity of resources for subsistence of local households and significantly contribute to conservation of native biodiversity. The highest diversity was recorded in homegardens where the neighbouring forests had the least diversity, suggesting that management of homegardens aims at compensating scarcity of naturally available plant resources. Cultivated species were markedly more abundant than plants under other management forms. Diversity harboured and management techniques make homegardens keystones in strategies for regional biodiversity conservation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiol...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 6, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carolina LariosAlejandro CasasMariana VallejoAna Moreno-CallesJosé Blancas Source Type: research

Plant management and biodiversity conservation in Nahuatl homegardens of the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico
Conclusion: Homegardens provide a high diversity of resources for subsistence of local households and significantly contribute to conservation of native biodiversity. The highest diversity was recorded in homegardens where the neighbouring forests had the least diversity, suggesting that management of homegardens aims at compensating scarcity of naturally available plant resources. Cultivated species were markedly more abundant than plants under other management forms. Diversity harboured and management techniques make homegardens keystones in strategies for regional biodiversity conservation. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiol...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 6, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carolina LariosAlejandro CasasMariana VallejoAna Moreno-CallesJosé Blancas Source Type: research

Medicinal plants used by women from Agnalazaha littoral forest (Southeastern Madagascar)
Conclusions: Littoral forests are rare ecosystems that are highly threatened on the island nation of Madagascar. Our investigation into the use of medicinal plants sourced from and around the Agnalazaha Forest by the women of Mahabo-Mananivo reinforces the need for this natural resource as a first line of health care for rural families. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 4, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mendrika RazafindraibeAlyse KuhlmanHarison RabarisonVonjison RakotoarimananaCharlotte RajeriarisonNivo RakotoariveloTabita RandrianarivonyFortunat RakotoarivonyReza LudovicArmand RandrianasoloRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

An empirical comparison of knowledge and skill in the context of traditional ecological knowledge
Conclusions: While we cannot rule out the possibility of a real association between these phenomena, we interpret our findings as support for the claim that researchers should distinguish between methods to measure knowledge and skill when studying trends in TEK. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Eric KightleyVictoria Reyes-GarciaKathryn DempsRuth MagtanongVictoria RamenzoniGayatri ThampyMaximilien GuezeJohn Stepp Source Type: research

The current status of ethnobiological research in Latin America: gaps and perspectives
This study aims to assess the panorama of ethnobiological research in Latin America by analyzing its evolution, trends, and future prospects. Methods: To conduct this study, we searched for papers in the Scopus (www.scopus.com) and Web of Science (www.isiknowledge.com) databases. The search was performed using combinations of keywords and the name of each Latin American country. The following countries were included in this study: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Venezuela, and Uruguay.Results and conclusionsAccording to our ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 16, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ulysses AlbuquerqueJosivan SilvaJuliana CamposRosemary SousaTaline SilvaRômulo Alves Source Type: research

Diversity of flora used for the cure of equine diseases in selected peri-urban areas of Punjab, Pakistan
Conclusions: This study generated lot of data on phytomedicinal approach for the treatment of ailments in the equines in some selected areas. It would, therefore, be imperative to expand similar studies in other parts of Pakistan and elsewhere. Moreover, use of the documented plants may be validated employing standard scientific procedures, which may have their application in the drug discovery/development by the pharmaceutical industry. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 30, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Khurram GorayaZafar IqbalMuhammad SajidGhulam MuhammadQurat AinMuhammad Saleem Source Type: research

Down deep in the holler: chasing seeds and stories in southern Appalachia
This essay, which is the third in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Ethnobiologists and their First Time in the Field", is a personal reflection by the researcher on his experience and involvement in kinship and friendship networks while conducting agrobiodiversity research in southern Appalachia, USA. Vignettes are given from moving moments spent with Native spiritual leaders, backcountry mountain people, and local co-collaborators in the research process. The author demonstrates how lasting field friendships have helped lead to groundbreaking ethnoecological research. (Source: Journal of ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 27, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: James Veteto Source Type: research

An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in Wayu Tuka District, East Welega Zone of Oromia Regional State, West Ethiopia
Conclusion: The number of reported medicinal plants and their uses by the local people of the District indicate the depth of the local indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants and their application. The documented medicinal plants can serve as a basis for future investigation of modern drug. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 25, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Moa MegersaZemede AsfawEnsermu KelbessaAbebe BeyeneBizuneh Woldeab Source Type: research

Traditional medicine practitioners¿ knowledge and views on treatment of pregnant women in three regions of Mali
Conclusion: Experience and knowledge about treatment of pregnant women with medicinal plants was broad among the traditional practitioners in the three investigated regions in Mali. Collaborating with traditional practitioners on the safe use of medicinal plants in pregnancy may promote safer pregnancies and better health for mothers and their unborn infants in Mali. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 17, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hedvig NordengWaled Al-ZayadiDrissa DialloNgolo BalloBerit Paulsen Source Type: research

Traditional medicine practitioners' knowledge and views on treatment of pregnant women in three regions of Mali
Conclusion: Experience and knowledge about treatment of pregnant women with medicinal plants was broad among the traditional practitioners in the three investigated regions in Mali. Collaborating with traditional practitioners on the safe use of medicinal plants in pregnancy may promote safer pregnancies and better health for mothers and their unborn infants in Mali. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 17, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hedvig NordengWaled Al-ZayadiDrissa DialloNgolo BalloBerit Paulsen Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical appraisal and cultural values of medicinally important wild edible vegetables of Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan
Conclusions: Patterns of wild edible plant usage depend mainly on socio-economic factors compare to climatic conditions or wealth of flora but during past few decades have harshly eroded due to change in the life style of the inhabitants. Use reports verified common cultural heritage and cultural worth of quoted taxa is analogous. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant activities, pharmacological applications; skill training in farming and biotechnological techniques to improve the yield are important feature prospective regarding of wild edible vegetables. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 14, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Arshad AbbasiMir KhanMunir ShahMohammad ShahArshad PervezMushtaq Ahmad Source Type: research

An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants used in Kilte Awulaelo District, Tigray Region of Ethiopia
Conclusion: Medicinal plants are still playing significant role in the management of various human and livestock diseases in the study area with herbs taking the lead in the number of plants used in the preparation of remedies, which may be an indication of their relatively better abundance as compared to other life forms. Recurrent drought was reported to have seriously threatened medicinal plant resources in the District. Awareness is thus needed be raised among local people on sustainable utilization and management of plant resources. Ex situ and in situ conservation measures should be taken to protect the medicinal pla...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 8, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Abraha TeklayBalcha AberaMirutse Giday Source Type: research

Collection and trade of wild-harvested orchids in Nepal
Conclusions: Collection of wild orchids was found to be widespread in Nepal, but illegal trade is threatening many species in the wild. Establishment of small-scale sustainable orchid breeding enterprises could be a valuable alternative for the production of medicinal orchids for local communities. Critically endangered species should be placed on CITES Appendix I to provide extra protection to those species. DNA barcoding is an effective method for species identification and monitoring of illegal cross-border trade. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 31, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Abishkar SubediBimal KunwarYoung ChoiYuntao DaiTinde van AndelRam ChaudharyHugo de BoerBarbara Gravendeel Source Type: research

Use and knowledge of Cactaceae in Northeastern Brazil
Conclusion: The survey showed that the Cactaceae is extremely important for several uses and categories attributed to different species. Apart from contributing to the ethnobotanical knowledge of the Cactaceae, another important focus of this study was to reinforce the necessity for further studies that record the traditional knowledge about this plant family, which has been lost in younger generations. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 28, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Camilla de LucenaReinaldo de LucenaGabriela CostaThamires CarvalhoGyslaynne CostaRômulo AlvesDaniel PereiraJoão RibeiroCarlos AlvesZelma QuirinoErnane Nunes Source Type: research

Ethnomedicinal study of plants used for human ailments in Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia
Background: Ankober District has long been inhabited by people who have a long tradition of using medicinal plants to treat human ailments. Overexploitation of medicinal plants coupled with an ever-increasing population growth, deforestation and agricultural land expansion threatens plants in the area. Hence, this study aimed at documenting and analyzing the plant-based ethnomedicinal knowledge of the people in order to preserve the dwindling indigenous knowledge. Methods: Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods. Quantitativ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 28, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ermias LulekalZemede AsfawEnsermu KelbessaPatrick Van Damme Source Type: research

A comparison of traditional food and health strategies among Taiwanese and Chinese immigrants in Atlanta, Georgia, USA
In this study, we conducted a medical ethnobotanical survey focusing on a comparison of local medicinal food and health strategies with members of two Asian immigrant populations in metro-Atlanta: Chinese and Taiwanese. Snowball sampling techniques were employed to recruit 83 study participants, 57 of which were included in the final analysis. Semi-structured interview techniques were used to question participants about their beliefs and usage of the yin yang system, usage of Chinese herbs and medicinal foods, preference and usage of Eastern and Western medicines, and gardening for medicinal foods.Results and conclusionCom...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 27, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sandy JiangCassandra Quave Source Type: research

Use of weeds as traditional vegetables in Shurugwi District, Zimbabwe
Conclusion: The present study confirm findings from similar studies conducted elsewhere that rural households engage in harvesting of wild edible vegetables and other non-timber forest products (NTFPs) as a survival strategy. Based on their potential nutritional and medicinal value, edible weeds could contribute in a major way to food security, basic primary health care and balanced diets of rural households and possibly urban households as well. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 20, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alfred Maroyi Source Type: research

Botanical identification of medicinal roots collected and traded in Morocco and comparison to the existing literature
Conclusions: More rigorous methodology and reporting are needed for medicinal plant research in Morocco. This will ensure that studies are comparable, help to protect traditional medicine users from negative health effects, and, support efforts to conserve overharvested wild medicinal plants. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 15, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Abderrahim OuarghidiGary MartinBronwen PowellGabrielle EsserAbdelaziz Abbad Source Type: research

Johan Turi's animal, mineral, vegetable cures and healing practices: an in-depth analysis of Sami (Saami) folk healing one hundred years ago
Conclusion: The research illustrates the variety and depth of a single informant's healing knowledge, and demonstrates the value of both historical sources and in-depth data collection with single experts as useful means of assessing and characterizing an indigenous population's healing traditions. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 13, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Thomas DuBoisJonathan Lang Source Type: research

Plants used for making recreational tea in Europe: a review based on specific research sites
This paper is a review of local plants used in water infusions as aromatic and refreshing hot beverages (recreational tea) consumed in food-related settings in Europe, and not for specific medicinal purposes. The reviewed 29 areas are located across Europe, covering the post-Soviet countries, eastern and Mediterranean Europe. Altogether, 142 taxa belonging to 99 genera and 40 families were reported. The most important families for making herbal tea in all research areas were Lamiaceae and Asteraceae, while Rosaceae was popular only in eastern and central Europe. With regards to botanical genera, the dominant taxa included ...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 13, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Renata SõukandCassandra QuaveAndrea PieroniManuel Pardo-de-SantayanaJavier TardíoRaivo Kalle¿ukasz ¿uczajIngvar SvanbergValeria KolosovaLaura Aceituno-MataGorka Menendez-BacetaIwona Ko¿odziejska-DegórskaEwa Piro¿nikowRolandas Petkevi¿iusAvni Hajda Source Type: research

Indigenous knowledge of zootherapeutic use among the Biate tribe of Dima Hasao District, Assam, Northeastern India
Conclusion: The study illustrates the in-depth knowledge of the Biate tribe on zootherapy. Systematic investigation to identify the active ingredient may lead to the development of new drugs, which would prompt protection of these valuable resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 12, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Albert Sajem Betlu Source Type: research

Treading & threading memories: a personal encounter with forest and people in Southern Venezuela
This brief essay, which represents the second editorial of the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Ethnobiologists and their First Time in the Field", captures a few memories of the author's first fieldwork in the Venezuelan rainforest. It is a collage of objects, subjects, feelings, spaces, and events that pendulate in spheres of meaning straddling between the author's identities as both a student and a woman. The author's evocations of fifteen years ago are diluted in lasting reflections about what could be ethnoecology embraced by spaces of interactions and associations between organisms and t...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 6, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Egleé Zent Source Type: research

Traditional botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers in southern Brazil
Conclusions: Ethnobotanical studies in rural-urban areas contribute to preserving local knowledge and provide information that aids in conserving the remaining ecosystems in the region. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 30, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Marcela BaptistaMarcelo RamosUlysses de AlbuquerqueGabriela Coelho-de-SouzaMara Ritter Source Type: research

¿Tertius gaudens¿: germplasm exchange networks and agroecological knowledge among home gardeners in the Iberian Peninsula
Conclusion: Our findings highlight the importance of social relations in the construction of traditional knowledge. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Victoria Reyes-GarcíaJosé MolinaLaura Calvet-MirLaura Aceituno-MataJuan LastraRicardo OntilleraMontse ParadaManuel Pardo-de-SantayanaMontse RigatJoan VallèsTeresa Garnatje Source Type: research

"Tertius gaudens": germplasm exchange networks and agroecological knowledge among home gardeners in the Iberian Peninsula
Conclusion: Our findings highlight the importance of social relations in the construction of traditional knowledge. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Victoria Reyes-GarcíaJosé MolinaLaura Calvet-MirLaura Aceituno-MataJuan LastraRicardo OntilleraMontse ParadaManuel Pardo-de-SantayanaMontse RigatJoan VallèsTeresa Garnatje Source Type: research

The use of the head louse as a remedy for jaundice in Spanish folk medicine: an overview
Conclusions: The survival of this therapy in the worldview of certain rural communities suggests the need to take into account the beliefs, ideas and behaviour patterns of popular culture in relation to health and disease. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 22, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: José Ramón VallejoJosé Antonio González Source Type: research

Comparative Survey of Entomophagy and Entomotherapeutic Practices in Six Tribes of Eastern Arunachal Pradesh (India)
A consolidated list of edible insects used in the eastern part of Arunachal Pradesh (N.E. India) by Wangcho (Wancho) and Nocte tribes of the Tirap District and the Shingpo, Tangsa, Deori and Chakma of the Changlang District has been prepared. The list is based on thorough, semi-structured field-interviews with 20 informants of each tribal group. At least 51 insect species, belonging to 9 orders were considered edible. The largest number of the edible species belonged to the Coleoptera (14), followed by 10 each of the Orthoptera and Hymenoptera, 9 of the Hemiptera, 3 Lepidoptera, 2 Isoptera and one each of Ephemeroptera, Od...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 19, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Jharna ChakravortySampat GhoshV Meyer-Rochow Source Type: research

Medicinal plants used for the treatment of various skin disorders by a rural community in northern Maputaland, South Africa
Conclusions: The preference of traditional medicine over allopathic medicine by most of the interviewees strengthens previous studies on the importance that traditional medicine can have in the primary health care system in this rural community. Studies to validate the potential of these plants independently and in their various combinations is underway to provide insight into the anti-infective role of each plant. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 19, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Helene De WetSibongile NcikiSandy van Vuuren Source Type: research

Wild mushroom- an underutilized healthy food resource and income generator: experience from Tanzania rural areas
Conclusion: This finding envisages the purposeful strengthening of WEM exploitation, which would contribute significantly in boosting the rural income/economy and reduce conflicts between community and forest conservers. The activity would also provide alternative employment, improve food security to rural disadvantaged groups especially women and old people hence improve their livelihood. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 10, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Donatha Tibuhwa Source Type: research

Ethnopharmacological survey of medicinal plants in Jeju Island, Korea
Conclusion: Consequently, results of this study will legally utilize to provide preparatory measures against the Nagoya Protocol (2010) about benefit-sharing for traditional knowledge of genetic resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 9, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mi-Jang SongHyun KimBrian HeldenbrandJongwook JeonSanghun Lee Source Type: research

Use of the palm Euterpe edulis martius in landscape units managed by migrants of German origin in Southern Brazil
Conclusions: The landscape heterogeneity of this community is influenced by changes in economic activities and by the relationship with the conservation unit. Landscape units resulting from this relationship may be identified. The species E.edulis is found within these landscape units and is integrated into the livelihood of the community. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 4, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Lucas de Souza MilanesiNivaldo PeroniMaurício dos Reis Source Type: research

Being a woman researcher in an Anatolian village
This manuscript is related with Making Friends in the Field, first experiences in an ethnobotanical fieldwork. It covers my experiences in Central Anatolia during 1994-1995. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 2, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Füsun Ertu¿ Source Type: research

The role of traditional medicine practice in primary health care within Aboriginal Australia: a review of the literature
The practice of traditional Aboriginal medicine within Australia is at risk of being lost due to the impact of colonisation. Displacement of people from traditional lands as well as changes in family structures affecting passing on of cultural knowledge are two major examples of this impact. Prior to colonisation traditional forms of healing, such as the use of traditional healers, healing songs and bush medicines were the only source of primary health care. It is unclear to what extent traditional medical practice remains in Australia in 2013 within the primary health care setting, and how this practice sits alongside the...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 2, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Stefanie Oliver Source Type: research

Ethnobotany of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch., an invasive species in Norway, or how plant names, uses, and other traditions evolve
Conclusions: Over the years, H. persicum has accumulated at least twenty different vernacular names in Norway, and a variety of other traditions. By necessity, all these traditions are less than 180 years old, showing that even modern and urban societies may produce a substantial body of plant lore, which certainly merits ethnobotanical attention. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Torbjørn Alm Source Type: research

Traditional medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes in rural and urban areas of Dhaka, Bangladesh -- an ethnobotanical survey
Conclusion: Traditional medicinal plants are commonly used in Bangladesh to treat diabetes. The available data regarding the anti-diabetic activity of the detected plants is not sufficient to adequately evaluate or recommend their use. Clinical intervention studies are required to provide evidence for a safe and effective use of the identified plants in the treatment of diabetes. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Soeren OcvirkMartin KistlerShusmita KhanShamim TalukderHans Hauner Source Type: research

Medicinal plants from swidden fallows and sacred forest of the Karen and the Lawa in Thailand
Conclusion: Sacred forest are important for providing medicinal plant species to the Karen and Lawa communities in northern Thailand, but the swidden fallows around the villages are equally important in terms of absolute numbers of medicinal plant species, and more important if counted as proportion of the total number of species in a habitat. This points to the importance of secondary vegetation as provider of medicinal plants around rural villages as seen elsewhere in the tropics. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 24, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Auemporn JunsongduangHenrik BalslevAngkhana IntaArunothai JampeetongPrasit Wangpakapattanawong Source Type: research

Values, animal symbolism, and human-animal relationships associated to two threatened felids in Mapuche and Chilean local narratives
This study aimed at understanding values and human-animal relationships with negatively perceived threatened carnivores through the disclosure of local stories and Mapuche traditional folktales. Methods: Our mixed approach comprised the qualitative analysis of 112 stories on the kodkod cat (Leopardus guigna) and the puma (Puma concolor) collected by students (9-14 years) from 28 schools in the Araucania region within their family contexts, 10 qualitative in-depth interviews with indigenous Mapuche people, and 35 traditional Mapuche legends and the significance of naming found in ethnographic collections. Results: We reveal...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 13, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Thora HerrmannElke SchüttlerPelayo BenavidesNicolas GálvezLisa SöhnNadja Palomo Source Type: research

Ecological and socio-cultural factors influencing plant management in Náhuatl communities of the Tehuacán Valley, Mexico
Background: Management types and their intensity may vary according to indicators such as: (1) practices complexity, (2) degree of techniques specialization, (3) occurrence and types of social regulations, (4) artificial selection intensity, (5) energy invested, (6) tools types, and (7) amounts of resources obtained. Management types of edible plants were characterized and analyzed in Náhuatl communities of the Tehuacán Valley. We expected that both natural and human pressures generate risk on plant resources availability, influencing human responses of management directed to decrease risk. We particularly hy...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 2, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: José BlancasAlejandro CasasDiego Pérez-SalicrupJavier CaballeroErnesto Vega Source Type: research

Influence of traditional markets on plant management in the Tehuacán Valley
Conclusion: Spatial distribution and plant parts used are particularly meaningful factors determining risk and influencing management actions on edible plant species interchanged in the region. Limited or inexistent management may favor extinction of local populations under risk. Local management techniques synthesize knowledge and experiences crucial for designing sustainable management programs. Traditional management techniques supported by ecological information and environmental management approaches could make valuable contributions for sustainable use of plant species, particularly those becoming economically import...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 1, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yaayé ArellanesAlejandro CasasAnselmo ArellanesErnesto VegaJosé BlancasMariana VallejoIgnacio TorresSelene Rangel-LandaAna MorenoLeonor SolísEdgar Pérez-Negrón Source Type: research