Folk knowledge of wild food plants among the tribal communities of Thakht-e-Sulaiman Hills, North-West Pakistan
Indigenous communities of the Thakht-e-Sulamian hills reside in the North-West tribal belt of Pakistan, where disadvantaged socio-economic frames, lack of agricultural land and food insecurity represent crucia... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - April 8, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Khalid Ahmad and Andrea Pieroni Source Type: research

Do artisanal fishers perceive declining migratory shorebird populations?
This paper discusses the results of ethno-ornithological research conducted on the local ecological knowledge (LEK) of artisanal fishers in northeast Brazil between August 2013 and October 2014. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 3, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Luciano Pires Andrade, Horasa Maria Lima Silva-Andrade, Rachel Maria Lyra-Neves, Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque and Wallace Rodrigues Telino-Júnior Source Type: research

Rapid assessment of insect fauna based on local knowledge: comparing ecological and ethnobiological methods
The rapid assessment of biodiversity making use of surveys of local knowledge has been successful for different biological taxa. However, there are no reports on the testing of such tools for sampling insect ... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - March 1, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Daniele Cristina de Oliveira Lima, Marcelo Alves Ramos, Henrique Costa Hermenegildo da Silva and Angelo Giuseppe Chaves Alves Source Type: research

An ethnobotanical analysis of parasitic plants (Parijibi) in the Nepal Himalaya
Indigenous biocultural knowledge is a vital part of Nepalese environmental management strategies; however, much of it may soon be lost given Nepal’s rapidly changing socio-ecological climate. This is particula... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 24, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Alexander Robert O’Neill and Santosh Kumar Rana Source Type: research

Acknowledgement of manuscript reviewers 2015
The editors of Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 11 (2015). (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 16, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Andrea Pieroni Source Type: research

A survey of wild plant species for food use in Sicily (Italy) – results of a 3-year study in four Regional Parks
This paper illustrates the results of a study carried out in four Regional Parks of Sicily (Italy), concerning traditional knowledge on food use of wild plant species. The main aims of the paper were: (i) to v... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 9, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Mario Licata, Teresa Tuttolomondo, Claudio Leto, Giuseppe Virga, Giuseppe Bonsangue, Ignazio Cammalleri, Maria Cristina Gennaro and Salvatore La Bella Source Type: research

Erratum to: Assessment of wild leafy vegetables traditionally consumed by the ethnic communities of Manipur, northeast India
(Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 8, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Surjata Konsam, Biseshwori Thongam and Arun Kumar Handique Source Type: research

Traditional knowledge and its transmission of wild edibles used by the Naxi in Baidi Village, northwest Yunnan province
The collection and consumption of wild edibles is an important part in livelihood strategies throughout the world. There is an urgent need to document and safeguard the wild food knowledge, especially in remot... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - February 5, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yanfei Geng, Yu Zhang, Sailesh Ranjitkar, Huyin Huai and Yuhua Wang Source Type: research

Assessment of wild leafy vegetables traditionally consumed by the ethnic communities of Manipur, northeast India
The NE region of India falls in the global hotspot of biodiversity. Wild edible plants (WEPs) are widely consumed in the daily diet of the local people. WEPs are critical for the sustenance of ethnic communiti... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 29, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Biseshwori Thongam, Surjata Konsam and Arun Kumar Handique Source Type: research

Ethnopharmacobotanical study on the medicinal plants used by herbalists in Sulaymaniyah Province, Kurdistan, Iraq
Medicinal plants still play an important role in the Kurdish community. Sulaymaniyah Province in South Kurdistan (Iraq) has a great diversity of plants, including medicinal plants, yet very few scattered ethno... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 28, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hiwa M. Ahmed Source Type: research

Food taboos and myths in South Eastern Nigeria: The belief and practice of mothers in the region
Poor nutritional practices especially in pregnancy and early childhood can result in dire consequences in the growth and development of a child. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 27, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Uchenna Ekwochi, Chidiebere D. I. Osuorah, Ikenna K. Ndu, Christian Ifediora, Isaac Nwabueze Asinobi and Christopher Bismark Eke Source Type: research

Erratum to: Ethnoichthyology of the indigenous Truká people, Northeast Brazil
(Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 14, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carlos Alberto Batista Santos and Rômulo Romeu Nóbrega Alves Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plant species used by communities around Mabira Central Forest Reserve, Uganda
An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants was carried out in 14 villages adjacent to Mabira Central Forest Reserve (CFR) in Central Uganda between August 2013 and March 2014. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 13, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Patience Tugume, Esezah K. Kakudidi, Mukadasi Buyinza, Justine Namaalwa, Maud Kamatenesi, Patrick Mucunguzi and James Kalema Source Type: research

Forming a joint dialogue among faith healers, traditional healers and formal health workers in mental health in a Kenyan setting: towards common grounds
This study thus aimed at the formation of dialogue and establishment of collaboration among the informal (faith and traditi... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 7, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Christine W. Musyimi, Victoria N. Mutiso, Erick S. Nandoya and David M. Ndetei Source Type: research

Ethnoichthyology of the indigenous Truká people, Northeast Brazil
Historically, fishing is an important activity for riverine communities established along the São Francisco River, including indigenous communities. In the present study, we researched fishing activities in tw... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 6, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carlos Alberto Batista Santos and Rômulo Romeu Nóbrega Alves Source Type: research

Foodways in transition: food plants, diet and local perceptions of change in a Costa Rican Ngäbe community
Indigenous populations are undergoing rapid ethnobiological, nutritional and socioeconomic transitions while being increasingly integrated into modernizing societies. To better understand the dynamics of these... (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - January 6, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ugo D’Ambrosio and Rajindra K. Puri Source Type: research

Farmers knowledge and perception on maize stem borers and their indigenous control methods in south western region of Cameroon
Conclusions: Farmers’ knowledge would contribute in understanding the activities of stem borers and use of plant insecticides. Research is therefore needed to standardize the methods of using plant-based products and also identify the active ingredients of these plants to ensure their effectiveness against maize stem borers and other pests. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 9, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Esther ObenNelson NtoniforSevilor KekeunouMartin Abbeytakor Source Type: research

Ræstur fiskur: air-dried fermented fish the Faroese way
Conclusion: The presence of small-scale fishing, changing economic conditions, socially acquired taste-preferences, and the importance of old-fashioned dishes as key symbols of cultural identity, all contribute to the survival of ræstur fiskur in Faroese food culture. Today, the dish is not only an essential food source, but its consumption is also an important act of identification and solidarity with the national identity of the islanders. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - November 4, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ingvar Svanberg Source Type: research

Bird naming systems by Akan people in Ghana follow scientific nomenclature with potentials for conservation monitoring
Conclusions: The study found evidence to support the prediction that indigenous bird naming systems in the Akan language follow scientific nomenclature. Indigenous knowledge and understanding of birds in the study area can be tapped and used in conservation planning and monitoring of birds. This research thus provides sufficient evidence to prove that indigenous knowledge by the Akan tribes in the study area can be useful in bird conservation and monitoring programs in Ghana. Further research in other Ghanaian languages is recommended. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 31, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Justus DeikumahVida KonaduRichard Kwafo Source Type: research

Attitudes and use of medicinal plants during pregnancy among women at health care centers in three regions of Mali, West-Africa
Conclusion: This study showed an extensive use and knowledge of medicinal plants during pregnancy in three regions in Mali. However, exclusive use of medicinal plants as treatment of malaria and urinary tract infections during pregnancy may pose a health risk for the mother and her unborn child. A wider collaboration with TPs, with local communities and conventional health workers of the health care centers, on the safe use of medicinal plants, is important to promote safer pregnancies and better health care for pregnant women and their unborn infants in Mali. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 9, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cecilie NergardThi HoDrissa DialloNgolo BalloBerit PaulsenHedvig Nordeng Source Type: research

Plant species introduced by foreigners according to folk tradition in Norway and some other European countries: xenophobic tales or not?
Conclusion: The spreading vectors assumed in folk tradition are correct and well documented, e.g. ship cargos (including goods and packing materials), which are responsible for introducing ballast plants and other anthropochores, and wartime activities, introducing a broad range of species (polemochores). They do not, however, apply to the species included in this study, which are either indigenous plants or introduced ornamentals. The foreigners appearing in the folk tales serve mostly as suitably exotic explanations for what is perceived “alien” plants. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - October 5, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Torbjørn Alm Source Type: research

Symbolism and ritual practices related to hunting in Maya communities from central Quintana Roo, Mexico
Conclusions: By performing the Loojil Ts’oon, the act of killing an animal is legitimized. The kill transforms into an exchange to perpetuate life, in which gods and Lords of animals grant the hunter the solicited new game if he has completed his ritual duties and has not broken the prescribed hunting rules. The Loojil Ts’oon does not only represent the continuity and regeneration of animals, that is, fauna as a resource, but also of the whole hunting cycle. The hunter does so to maintain and recreate order and equilibrium in one’s relationship with nature as a whole, with the rest of one’s social g...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 29, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dídac Santos-FitaEduardo NaranjoErin EstradaRamón MariacaEduardo Bello Source Type: research

Current use of wild plants with edible underground storage organs in a rural population of Patagonia: between tradition and change
Conclusion: For the Mapuche people, wild plants have constituted material and symbolic resources of great importance in their historical subsistence. In addition, they are currently being redefined as elements which present a connection with ancestral practices, produce a strong relationship with the ‘land’, and become markers which identify the ‘natural’ (historical) ways of their people; these are key elements in the current political processes of identity revaluation. This research is valuable to stimulate cultural revival and health promotion programs in the communities with their own local, cul...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 25, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Juan OchoaAna Ladio Source Type: research

The use of Amerindian charm plants in the Guianas
Conclusions: Charm plants serve as vehicles for traditional knowledge on animal behavior, tribal warfare and other aspects of oral history and should therefore deserve more scientific and societal attention, especially because there are indications that traditional knowledge on charms is disappearing. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 15, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tinde van AndelSofie RuysschaertKarin BovenLewis Daly Source Type: research

An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants in Trinidad
Conclusions: Our survey showed significant retention of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in rural Trinidad. More interestingly, a large remnant of medico-cultural concepts such as “cooling/cleanser”, “afterbirth”, “stoppage-of-water” and “womb infection” persist in the rural population. Although the scientific literature show that some of the cited plants possessed antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and related pharmacological activities in laboratory studies, these results must be taken with caution until clinical trials are conducted to establish safety and efficacy....
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 15, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Y. ClementY. Baksh-ComeauC. Seaforth Source Type: research

Medicinal plants used to treat the most frequent diseases encountered in Ambalabe rural community, Eastern Madagascar
Conclusions: This study highlighted the closed relationship between people in Ambalabe and plant species, especially when faced with frequent diseases. However, most of the species used were collected in the surroundings of the villages. Few species were from Vohibe forest in which a management system on the use of plant species was already established. Therefore, a sustainable use management should be considered for wild species from which medicinal plants are highly abundant. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 15, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Nivo RakotoariveloFortunat RakotoarivonyAro RamarosandratanaVololoniaina JeannodaAlyse KuhlmanArmand RandrianasoloRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Integrated approach to the understanding of the degradation of an urban river: local perceptions, environmental parameters and geoprocessing
Conclusions: The interdisciplinary approach used in this research allowed the understanding of the degradation process of an urban river and some negative effects through the integration of environmental data, GIS and the local knowledge, revealing the complementarity of obtained data and the effectiveness of implementation of this approach. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 15, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Carolina CollierMiguel Almeida NetoGabriela AretakisRangel SantosTiago de OliveiraJosé MourãoWilliam SeveriAna El-Deir Source Type: research

An iconic traditional apiculture of park fringe communities of Borena Sayint National Park, north eastern Ethiopia
Conclusion: The apicultural tradition is iconic with economic value and forming part of the local peoples’ cultural identity apt to be preserved as a bequest for posterity. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - September 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Hussien AdalZemede AsfawZerihun WolduSebsebe DemissewPatrick van Damme Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical study of homegarden plants in Sebeta-Awas District of the Oromia Region of Ethiopia to assess use, species diversity and management practices
Conclusion: It can be concluded that homegardens in the study area are rich in crops and, therefore, significantly contribute to the agrobiodiversity of the study District, in particular, and Ethiopia, in general. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 22, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tefera MekonenMirutse GidayEnsermu Kelbessa Source Type: research

The social context of wild leafy vegetables uses in Shiri, Daghestan
Conclusions: 1) Wild leafy vegetables are a significant element of everyday social life in Shiri in regard to mutual care, respect for elders and local identity. 2) Gender has a greater influence on practical skills than on declarative plant knowledge. 3) Names of plants are publicly discussed with elders and are not always fixed. 4) The moral value ascribed to giving in the local culture is expressed through wild leafy vegetables. 5) Care expressed through sending wild leafy vegetables helps to sustain social ties between migrants and Shiri inhabitants. 6) Identity, health and naturalness discourses are adding value to th...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 11, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Iwona KaliszewskaIwona Ko¿odziejska-Degórska Source Type: research

TEK, local perceptions of risk, and diversity of management practices of Agave inaequidens in Michoacán, Mexico
Conclusions: Interchange of knowledge and management experiences developed by handlers is crucial for the regional conservation, recovering, and sustainable management of A. inaequidens populations. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - August 5, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ignacio TorresJosé BlancasAlejandro LeónAlejandro Casas Source Type: research

Medicinal plants sold in the markets of Antananarivo, Madagascar
Conclusions: The markets of Antananarivo have always played a vital cultural role in the lives of urban Malagasy, but our study shows they also play an economic role not only for urban residents but rural harvesters as well. Continued research and monitoring of the non-timber forest products trade in Antananarivo is needed to better understand the impact of trade on the wild plant populations. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 28, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Maria RandriamiharisoaAlyse KuhlmanVololoniaina JeannodaHarison RabarisonNivo RakotoariveloTabita RandrianarivonyFortunat RaktoarivonyArmand RandrianasoloRainer Bussmann Source Type: research

Motivations for food prohibitions during pregnancy and their enforcement mechanisms in a rural Ghanaian district
Conclusions: Food taboos and traditional beliefs targeting pregnant women exist in Upper Manya Krobo. Pregnant women are forbidden from eating snails, rats, snakes, hot foods and animal lungs. To a large extent, socio-cultural, and to a lesser, health concerns motivate the practice. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 17, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Samson ArzoaquoiEdward EssumanFred GbagboEric TenkorangIreneous SoyiriAmos Laar Source Type: research

Plant selection for ethnobotanical uses on the Amalfi Coast (Southern Italy)
Conclusions: Our study showed that selection criteria for plant uses (including medicinal) are not always based on phylogeny. The comparison of different statistical methods (regression, binomial and Bayesian) under different conditions led to the conclusion that the most conservative results are obtained using regression analysis. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 15, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: V. SavoR. JoyG. CanevaW. McClatchey Source Type: research

The changing role of a Vaidya (non-codified traditional doctor) in the community health of Kerala, Southern India: comparison of treatment-seeking behaviours between the Vaidya’s patients and community members
Conclusion: It is thus concluded that the medical practice has changed depending on its cultural and social contexts, even though its medicinal effects had been proven by scientific survey. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 10, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sachi Matsuoka Source Type: research

Factors affecting home gardens ownership, diversity and structure: a case study from Benin
Conclusion: Results suggest effects of complex interactions between socio-economic factors on HG ownership, and influence of these effects combined with intrinsic characteristics of HGs on PD. The early involvement of women in home gardening and their particular interest in herbs and shrubs are important assets for future conservation strategies based on HG and food production. Interventions are required to interfere with declining PD in HG across generations to accommodate multiple ecosystem service benefits. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - July 9, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Rodrigue GbedomonAdandé FandohanValère SalakoAlix IdohouRomain Kaka¿Achille Assogbadjo Source Type: research

Explaining the resurgent popularity of the wild: motivations for wild plant gathering in the Biosphere Reserve Grosses Walsertal, Austria
Conclusions: The resurgent popularity of wild plant gathering comes along with an internalization of motivations: the main motivations for wild plant gathering changed from the external extrinsic motivation of gathering because of necessity towards the internalized extrinsic motivation of gathering for the highly esteemed product quality and the intrinsic motivation of gathering for the pleasure of the activity itself. This internalization of motivations supports the persistence of wild plant gathering, a positive self-perception of gatherers and good quality of engagement with wild plant gathering. (Source: Journal of Eth...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 30, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Christoph SchunkoSusanne GrasserChristian Vogl Source Type: research

Ethnoveterinary of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara: camel diseases and remedies
Conclusions: This study provides an overall picture of the most important camel diseases and remedies as reported by Sahrawi informants, detailing how the vast knowledge that the Sahrawi hold on the health and disease of their camels is constructed through contrasts between their customary nomadic land (and associated climate, soils, grazing and therapeutic resources) and the surrounding areas (and associated diseases), which are traditionally used only in cases of drought. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 20, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Gabriele VolpatoSaleh Lamin SalehAntonello Di Nardo Source Type: research

Wild edible plant knowledge, distribution and transmission: a case study of the Achí Mayans of Guatemala
Conclusions: The WEP survey may serve as a reference point and as a useful compilation of knowledge for the community for their current and future generations. This study shows that the elder and the refugees living in the area for longer time know more than others about WEPs. It also shows the important role of knowledge transmission through relatives to preserve TEK. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 16, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Nerea Turreira-GarcíaIda TheiladeHenrik MeilbyMarten Sørensen Source Type: research

From economic survival to recreation: contemporary uses of wild food and medicine in rural Sweden, Ukraine and NW Russia
Conclusions: In the economically less developed rural areas of Ukraine and Russia, the use of NWFPs continues to be an important part of livelihoods, both as a source of income and for domestic use as food and medicine. In Sweden the collection of wild food has become mainly a recreational activity and the use of medicinal plants is no longer prevalent among our respondents. This leads us to suggest that the consumption of wild food and medicine is influenced by the socio-economic situation in a country. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 16, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Nataliya StryametsMarine ElbakidzeMelissa CeuterickPer AngelstamRobert Axelsson Source Type: research

Cultural landscapes of the Araucaria Forests in the northern plateau of Santa Catarina, Brazil
Conclusions: These areas still remain today due to cultural tradition, use and management of plant resources. Through this cultural tradition of maintaining caívas the vegetation of the Araucaria Forest has been conserved associated to the use of the Araucaria Forests native plant resources. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 9, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Anna Machado MelloNivaldo Peroni Source Type: research

Socio-cultural profile of Bapedi traditional healers as indigenous knowledge custodians and conservation partners in the Blouberg area, Limpopo Province, South Africa
Conclusions: State health care has negatively influenced the practice of traditional healing as patients now first consult government health centres before turning to traditional healers. In the past, traditional healing has been ignored because, as an oral history, it could not be included in school curricula or government policy documents. Those traditional healers who learn to write will have the skills to document and safeguard their own knowledge. This can help to prevent the erosion of knowledge around Blouberg’s medicinal plants and support the conservation of natural resources in the area. Adult learning prog...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 6, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Malehu MathibelaBronwyn EganHelena Du PlessisMartin Potgieter Source Type: research

From Disease to Holiness: Religious-based health remedies of Italian folk medicine (XIX-XX century)
Conclusions: The vastus corpus of religious remedies, highlighted in the present work, shows the need for spirituality of the sick and represent a symbolic framework, that works as a filter, mediates, containing the pain that constantly fills everyone’s lives in remote ages even in the third millennium. All of this confirms how important the health-workers know and interpret these existential needs from anthropological and psychological points of view. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - June 6, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Nelide RomeoOlivier GalloGiuseppe Tagarelli Source Type: research

Rats: if you can’t beat them eat them! (Tricks of the trade observed among the Adi and other North-East Indian tribals)
Conclusion: Given the need to meet the world’s future food demands and the environmental consequences of an expanding livestock production with regard to global warming, water availability, deforestation, soil erosion etc., rats as a food item, as our example shows, should not be overlooked. Using rats as food reduces hunting pressures on other wild and often already rare animals. It is a far superior method to control rat populations than poisoning the rodents and the artisanal construction of rat traps by local menfolk helps maintaining traditional skills and knowledge. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 30, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Victor Meyer-RochowKarsing MeguJharna Chakravorty Source Type: research

Knowledge and use of wild edible plants in rural communities along Paraguay River, Pantanal, Brazil
Conclusion: This study indicated more knowledge retained in communities more distant from the urban area, indifference in distribution of knowledge between genders and the higher cultural competence of elderly people in respect to knowledge of wild edible botanicals. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 30, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Ieda BortolottoMaria AmorozoGermano NetoJens OldelandGeraldo Damasceno-Junior Source Type: research

Ethnobotany of wild plants used for starting fermented beverages in Shui communities of southwest China
Conclusions: Findings from this study can serve as a basis for future investigation on fermented beverages and foods and associated knowledge and cultural practices. However, with rapid development, utilization of wild plants and the cultural systems that support them are at risk of erosion. Cultural preservation practices are necessary in Shui communities for the continued use and transmission of this ethnobiological knowledge as well as associated biodiversity. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 28, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Liya HongJingxian ZhuoQiyi LeiJiangju ZhouSelena AhmedChaoying WangYuxiao LongFeifei LiChunlin Long Source Type: research

Multi-dimensionality and variability in folk classification of stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponini)
Conclusions: We support the multidimensionality of folk classification systems. This confirms the specificity of local classification systems but also reflects the use of grouping strategies and mechanisms commonly observed in other cultural groups, such as the use of similarity judgments between more or less prototypical organisms. Also we support the idea that alternative naming results from a process of fragmentation of knowledge or incomplete transmission of knowledge. These processes lean on the facts that culturally based knowledge, on the one hand, and biologic knowledge of nature on the other, can be acquired throu...
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Fernando ZamudioNorma Hilgert Source Type: research

Ethnobotanical survey of medicinal dietary plants used by the Naxi People in Lijiang Area, Northwest Yunnan, China
Conclusions: The medicinal dietary plants used by the Naxi people are diverse and are used to treat a wide spectrum of body disorders. Further studies focusing on safety, detoxification, and nutritional value of the plants should be conducted to allow them to be used to improve health and prevent diseases in modern society. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 12, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Lingling ZhangYu ZhangShengji PeiYanfei GengChen WangWang Yuhua Source Type: research

Cultural significance of wild mammals in mayan and mestizo communities of the Lacandon Rainforest, Chiapas, Mexico
Conclusions: The data obtained in this study demonstrates the existence of differential cultural patterns in the relationships that Lacandon and mestizo groups establish with mammals. Species are deemed important either because they are eaten of because of the harm they cause. We suggest the incorporation of local conceptions about wild animals in conservation frameworks for the fauna in the Lacandon Rainforest. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Yasminda García del ValleEduardo NaranjoJavier CaballeroCarlos MartorellFelipe Ruan-SotoPaula Enríquez Source Type: research

Isolated, but transnational: the glocal nature of Waldensian ethnobotany, Western Alps, NW Italy
Conclusions: The great resilience of plant knowledge among Waldensians may be the result of the long isolation and history of marginalisation that this group has faced during the last few centuries, although their ethnobotany present trans-national elements.Cross-cultural and ethno-historical approaches in ethnobotany may offer crucial data for understanding the trajectory of change of plant knowledge across time and space. (Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine)
Source: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine - May 7, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Giada BelliaAndrea Pieroni Source Type: research