Health Care Inequities of Sexual and Gender Minority Patients
This article provides a broad overview of systemic inequalities confronting SGM patients. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - December 24, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Erica Arnold, Nikhil Dhingra Source Type: research

A New Era of Care for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Community
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) awareness in the United States is growing. As individuals from these unique communities take on increasingly visible and prominent roles in society, in politics, and in the mainstream media, the general public will look to leaders in medicine to set a precedent of inclusion and nonprejudice. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - December 6, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Lauren Meshkov Bonati, Jared Jagdeo Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Anogenital Dermatitis in Men Who Have Sex with Men
Evaluation of anogenital dermatitis requires a detailed history, including a sexual history. Men who have sex with men have different risk of certain infectious causes compared with men who have sex with women. Infectious causes of balanitis and anal dermatitis are easily treatable once identified. Irritant contact dermatitis is a common cause of balanitis, and avoidance of irritants, including decreased soap washing, helps many patients improve. Detailed histories of the personal products used by the patient and partner(s), including soaps, lotions, perfumes, lubricants, condoms, topical medications, hygiene sprays, perso...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - December 5, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Patrick E. McCleskey Source Type: research

Trainee Exposure and Education for Minimally Invasive Gender-Affirming Procedures
This article assesses the current amount of trainee exposure in clinic and didactic sessions in core procedural specialties nationwide via survey study of program directors. Low exposure of residents and fellows to MIGAPs was observed overall and a lack of procedure-specific education. In an effort to provide excellent patient care, promote cultural humility, and improve patients ’ quality of life, further education regarding these procedures is necessary. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - December 4, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Brittany Buhalog, Jon Klint Peebles, Matthew Mansh, Esther A. Kim, Philip Daniel Knott, William Hoffman, Rahul Seth, Andre Alcon, Sarah Tuttleton Arron Source Type: research

Minimally Invasive Procedures for Gender Affirmation
This article discusses gender transition, applicable minimally invasive procedures for the face and body, and illustrative case examples. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - December 2, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jennifer L. MacGregor, Yunyoung C. Chang Source Type: research

Historical and Current State of Dermatologic Care for Sexual and Gender Minority Populations
This article discusses historical perspectives and current state of LGBTQ/SGM dermatology and attempts to define directions for future research and improvement. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 29, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yi Chun Lai, Maryia Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia Kazlouskaya Source Type: research

The Patient ’s Perspective
The past decade has seen significant advancements in care and representation of LGBTQ patients in American health care. These efforts have primarily taken the form of institutional policy changes and medical staff training in cultural competency. Drawing from patient interviews and author expertise, this article discusses the patient experience as the starting point for the development of effective, inclusive policy. Looking to the related field of LGBTQ youth wellness and education, and focusing on an integrative approach to LGBTQ health care within the University of Pennsylvania Health System, this article seeks to refra...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Andrew V. Ruoss, William R. Short, Carrie L. Kovarik Source Type: research

Ways to Improve Care for LGBT Patients in Dermatology Clinics
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) patients face significant dermatologic health disparities. LGBT patients are often discriminated against, refused healthcare, or otherwise have negative healthcare experiences that may deter future utilization of professional care. While a number of factors may mitigate these negative experiences, the present article focuses on improving organizational and institutional drivers specific to individual dermatology clinics. Clinic workflow and operations, emerging technologies and EHRs, clinic culture, clinic environment and resource availability, and provider and staff education...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Justin L. Jia, Danielle J. Polin, Kavita Y. Sarin Source Type: research

Acne and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender Teenager
Although most teenagers experience acne, for sexual and gender minority teenagers, acne could be more challenging and require specific psychosocial considerations. Acne may be more strongly associated with mental health issues in sexual and gender minority adolescents. Acne development during puberty may trigger gender dysphoria in transgender patients. Transgender and gender nonbinary patients receiving testosterone therapy may experience new or worsening acne. Comprehensive care for moderate to severe acne in sexual and gender minority adolescents should include culturally competent discussions about sexual behaviors, co...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 26, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Laura Ragmanauskaite, Benjamin Kahn, BaoChau Ly, Howa Yeung Source Type: research

Androgenetic Alopecia in Gender Minority Patients
Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in adults and may be particularly distressing for gender minority patients, given the close relation between hair and gender expression. Furthermore, use of gender affirming hormones such as testosterone in transmen and estrogen/antiandrogens in transwomen has a direct effect on hair growth distribution and density. Clinicians should thus be knowledgeable about the effects of sex hormones on the hair growth cycle to comfortably diagnose and treat AGA in gender minority patients. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 26, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Dustin H. Marks, Maryanne M. Senna Source Type: research

Incorporating Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Training into a Residency Program
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience vast health care disparities. Numerous government and professional organizations have attempted to address these disparities by calling for improvement in LGBT health and increased research endeavors. Despite these initiatives, residents still receive inadequate education and training in LGBT health. Here, the authors review these shortcomings and provide a framework for how to improve resident education and training in LGBT health. They describe methods of curricular enhancements and departmental/institutional climate optimization to improve resident compe...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 26, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Joseph W. Fakhoury, Steven Daveluy Source Type: research

Update on Medical Education, Insurance Coverage, and Health Care Policy for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning, Intersexual, and Asexual Patients
There are important gaps in LGBTQIA knowledge, clinical competency, and cultural sensitivity, as well as attitudes among health care professionals, medical educators, and those in the public and insurance policy sectors. These are not only professional deficiencies but also perpetuate discrimination, limit access to health care, and lead to poor health outcomes. Research supports the notion that acquiring skills and knowledge through dedicated training programs leads to more compassionate and competent care for LGBTQIA patients. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 23, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Tien Viet Nguyen Source Type: research

Skin Cancer and Skin Cancer Risk Factors in Sexual and Gender Minorities
Sexual and gender minorities have unique risk factors that may increase their risk of developing skin cancer. In particular, sexual minority men report a higher prevalence of skin cancer (including both keratinocytes carcinomas and melanoma), higher rates of indoor tanning, and overall poorer sun protection behaviors. Sexual and gender minorities also have high rates of alcohol and tobacco use, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus and human papillomavirus, which may increase overall risk of developing skin cancer in these populations. In this review, we discuss the evidence surrounding skin cancer and associated...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 23, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Dustin H. Marks, Sarah T. Arron, Matthew Mansh Source Type: research

Preexposure Prophylaxis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection for Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Persons:
HIV remains an important public health concern in the United States, particularly for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender persons. With HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), persons who are HIV-uninfected take antiretroviral medications to prevent HIV infection. The most common PrEP regimen involves taking a single pill daily and is very effective in reducing risk of HIV infection, with few adverse effects. Barriers to PrEP access exist for MSM and transgender persons. Dermatologists can help combat the ongoing HIV epidemic among MSM, transgender persons, and others by understanding why, when, and how PrEP should...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 23, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kenneth A. Katz, Andrew J. Park, Julia L. Marcus Source Type: research

Surgical Facial Esthetics for Gender Affirmation
This article outlines sexual differences between facial features and discusses surgical procedures designed to alter facial appearance and sexu al identity. The diagnosis of facial dimorphism and limitations of these techniques are outlined. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 21, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jonathan M. Sykes, Amanda E. Dilger, Alexander Sinclair Source Type: research

How It Works
Phototherapeutic modalities induce apoptosis of keratinocytes and immune cells, impact cytokine production, downregulate the IL-23/Th17 axis, and induce regulatory T cells. As in anti-IL-17 or anti-IL-23 antibody treatment, the dual action of phototherapy on skin and the immune system is likely responsible for sustained resolution of lesions in diseases such as psoriasis. In cutaneous T cell lymphoma, phototherapy may function by causing tumor cell apoptosis and eliminating the neoplastic and inflammatory infiltrate. Further research on phototherapeutic mechanisms will help advance, optimize, and refine dermatologic treatm...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Zizi Yu, Peter Wolf Source Type: research

Feeling the Burn
An interaction between light ’s radiation and certain exogenous and endogenous substances can lead to the development of photoallergic and/or phototoxic dermatoses. Clinically, reactions may range from acute and self-limited to chronic and recurrent. Delays in diagnosis are not uncommon due to complex clinical presentations, broad differentials, and limited number of specialists who perform phototesting. Therefore, a critical understanding of these dermatoses is essential for accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. The epidemiology, light sources, mechanisms, clinical presentations, evaluation protocols, commo...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Andrea N. Hinton, Ari M. Goldminz Source Type: research

Utilizing UVA-1 Phototherapy
There is a long history of utilization of phototherapy for treatment of skin conditions. Because of its longer wavelength, UVA1 phototherapy is able to penetrate into the dermis and subcutis. This depth of penetration, combined with its unique immunomodulating properties, makes UVA1 an effective treatment modality for many immune-mediated skin diseases. In some cases, it performs better than other types of phototherapy. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Smriti Prasad, Jennifer Coias, Henry W. Chen, Heidi Jacobe Source Type: research

Phototherapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
This article provides practical guidelines for the design and implementation of a phototherapy protocol for early stage MF, including an overview of treatment phases, response criteria, and considerations in the selection of a light source. Several evolving topics in phototherapy research are also discussed, including the relative efficacy of PUVA versus NBUVB, the role of maintenance therapy, risk of photocarcinogenicity, and combination therapies. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Arthur Marka, Joi B. Carter Source Type: research

Home UV Phototherapy
We describe the history of home phototherapy, the devices available, and associated costs. A literature review used PubMed. Keywords included: “home phototherapy,” “tanning beds,” “narrowband ultraviolet B.” In a randomized control trial, home phototherapy had similar efficacy to office-based phototherapy. Home phototherapy is associated with significant cost savings treatment and increased adherence. Home phototherapy should b e considered for its economic value, good tolerability, adherence, and efficacy. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jason Jacob, Adrian Pona, Abigail Cline, Steven Feldman Source Type: research

Phototherapy in the 21st Century
DERMATOLOGIC CLINICS (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Elizabeth A. Buzney Source Type: research

Copyright
ELSEVIER (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Contributors
BRUCE H. THIERS, MD (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Contents
Elizabeth A. Buzney (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Forthcoming Issues
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Dermatology (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - November 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Optimizing Narrowband UVB Phototherapy Regimens for Psoriasis
This article covers fundamental considerations for physicians using NBUVB and highlights changes in the newest guideline recommendations for phototherapy treatment. Protocols for treatment initiation, maintenance, dose increases, and maintenance are compared and discussed. Readers will achieve a greater understanding of the fundamentals of NBUVB phototherapy and promising advances in the field, including home phototherapy and combination treatment. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Rebecca L. Yanovsky, Kathie P. Huang, Elizabeth A. Buzney Source Type: research

The Science and (Lost) Art of Psoralen Plus UVA Phototherapy
PUVA phototherapy is the therapeutic use of psoralens and UVA light to treat inflammatory skin diseases, with psoriasis the prototype disease. Naturally occurring phototoxic compounds, psoralens interact with UVA to suppress DNA synthesis and cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of inflammatory cells. Well-developed therapeutic protocols for psoriasis guide psoralen and UVA doses, treatment frequency, and safety measures, and these protocols also may be used to treat other inflammatory dermatoses. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Elisabeth G. Richard Source Type: research

Distinguishing Myth from Fact
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation contributes to the development of skin cancer through direct and indirect DNA damage, production of reactive oxygen species, and local immunomodulation. The association between UV radiation and skin cancer has raised concern for the risk of carcinogenesis following phototherapy. The photocarcinogenic impact of psoralen and UVA radiation (PUVA) has been extensively studied, whereas limited safety studies exist for other phototherapy modalities, such as broadband and narrowband UVB and UVA1. Because of the as of yet unclear risk, patients who have undergone any type of phototherapy should be follow...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Katherine G. Thompson, Noori Kim Source Type: research

Phototherapy for Vitiligo
This article provides clinicians with the critical information needed to safely and effectively provide phototherapy for their patients with vitiligo. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Raheel Zubair, Iltefat H. Hamzavi Source Type: research

Phototherapy in Skin of Color
Phototherapy in skin of color requires special consideration. Pigmented skin is an efficient ultraviolet filter. Hence, higher doses of ultraviolet radiation are generally more effective and well tolerated in skin of color. An objective and practical system has not yet been established to determine optimal phototherapy dosing in skin of color. The authors recommend obtaining a detailed history of each individual patient ’s response to sun exposure before prescribing a phototherapy dosing regimen. In addition, providers should consider the role of socioeconomic factors and their impact on phototherapy-related outcomes...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Olivia R. Ware, Jonathan Guiyab, Ginette A. Okoye Source Type: research

Phototherapy in the Evaluation and Management of Photodermatoses
Ultraviolet light (UV) and visible light are important components in the diagnosis of photodermatoses, and UV has the unique ability to also be used to manage photodermatoses. Phototesting, provocative light testing, and photopatch testing can provide important information in diagnosing patients with photodermatoses; phototesting can be used to determine the starting dose for phototherapy in these patients. Once photosensitivity is established, narrowband UVB and UVA1 therapy have helped to improve the quality of life of photosensitive patients, such as those with polymorphous light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, an...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Angela J. Jiang, Henry W. Lim Source Type: research

Phototherapy for Itch
Phototherapy is an effective treatment modality for many types of pruritus. Although the exact mechanisms by which phototherapy reduces itch vary across pruritic conditions, its effects may result from immune suppression and/or neural modulation. In this article, the authors review the efficacy of different types of phototherapy for common inflammatory and noninflammatory pruritic conditions and discuss common side effects, such as erythema and exacerbation of pruritus. Although phototherapy may be an effective and relatively safe option for skin-directed treatment of chronic itch, barriers may exist for individual patient...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Connie S. Zhong, Sarina B. Elmariah Source Type: research

Beyond the Booth
The excimer laser has emerged as an efficacious treatment modality for many dermatologic diseases. The excimer laser is an alternative to standard narrowband ultraviolet B (NBUVB) phototherapy treatment in patients with limited disease. In comparison to standard NBUVB, the excimer laser requires fewer treatment sessions, has reduced treatment duration, requires a lower cumulative UVB dose, and limits UVB exposure to lesional skin. This review addresses the mechanism, safety, application, and efficacy of the excimer laser for the treatment of these conditions. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Karen Ly, Mary P. Smith, Quinn G. Thibodeaux, Kristen M. Beck, Wilson Liao, Tina Bhutani Source Type: research

Phototherapy in the Pediatric Population
Phototherapy has been used successfully to treat a wide range of pediatric skin conditions. It is a viable option in children with severe dermatologic disease or who have failed first-line treatments, and several studies have demonstrated its efficacy and safety in the pediatric population. Despite the growing body of evidence on the use of phototherapy in children, large controlled trials and long-term studies are lacking. Moreover, special considerations must be taken when using phototherapy in children. This review highlights the recent evidence supporting the efficacy and safety of phototherapy in children, with focus ...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Michelle C. Juarez, Anna L. Grossberg Source Type: research

Creating and Managing a Phototherapy Center
Phototherapy is a safe and effective treatment for many benign and malignant inflammatory cutaneous diseases. Treatment courses require consistent visits over the course of weeks to months, and one barrier for patients in accessing this treatment is the lack of a geographically convenient phototherapy center. To expand access, new phototherapy centers can be created, and this can be done in a series of steps. These include considering the physical space, anticipating the finances, laying the operational groundwork, and establishing a consent and education process. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Zizi Yu, Kathie P. Huang, Elizabeth A. Buzney Source Type: research

Shedding Light on Phototherapy
Phototherapy remains an essential tool in the dermatologist ’s treatment armamentarium, and yet, we find that as less time is spent teaching phototherapy to our dermatology trainees, that more dermatologists view what happens in the phototherapy center as an unknown, a literal and figurative “black box.” The goal of this issue is to bridge that gap and to give dermatologists the tools to both learn and teach the standards and pearls of phototherapy. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - October 16, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Elizabeth Buzney Tags: Preface Source Type: research

Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans
Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon dermal neoplasm that exhibits a high rate of local recurrence and infiltrative behavior, but has a low risk of metastasis. It arises as a slowly progressive, painless pink or violet plaque. Histologically, DFSP is characterized by a monomorphous spindle cell proliferation in a storiform pattern. The gold standard of treatment is surgical resection with negative margins. In cases where obtaining clear margins is not possible, radiation and systemic therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib mesylate, has been shown to be effective. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Aubrey Allen, Christine Ahn, Omar P. Sang üeza Source Type: research

Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma
Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) represents a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas in which monoclonal T lymphocytes infiltrate the skin. The mechanism of CTCL development is not fully understood, but likely involves dysregulation of various genes and signaling pathways. A variety of treatment modalities are available, and although they can induce remission in most patients, the disease may recur after treatment cessation. Owing to relatively low incidence and significant chronicity of disease, and the high morbidity of some therapeutic regimens, further clinical trials are warranted to better define the...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Erik Peterson, Jason Weed, Kristen Lo Sicco, Jo-Ann Latkowski Source Type: research

Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Cutaneous Melanoma in Skin of Color Patients
Skin cancers are relatively rare in patients with skin of color; however, they are an important public health concern because of disparities in patient outcomes. Gaps in skin cancer knowledge exist because of lack of large-scale studies involving people of color, and limitations in data collection methods and skin classification paradigms. Additional research is needed to address questions regarding risk and reasons for disparate skin cancer outcomes in these patients. We summarize the clinical and epidemiologic features for basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma and touch on some of their unique featu...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Latrice Hogue, Valerie M. Harvey Source Type: research

Phakomatoses
present with characteristic findings on the skin, central or peripheral nervous system, and tumors. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is the most common syndrome and is characterized by Caf é-au-lait macules, intertriginous freckling, Lisch nodules, and tumors including neurofibromas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and gliomas. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex is characterized by benign hamartomas presenting with hypomelanotic macules, shagreen patches, angiofibromas, confetti le sions and tumors including cortical tubers, subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tumors of the kidney, lung, and he...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Benjamin Becker, Roy E. Strowd Source Type: research

Updates on Merkel Cell Carcinoma
Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive skin cancer associated with the Merkel cell Polyomavirus. Its incidence and mortality are increasing. There have been many advances in the last several decades in the etiology, detection, and management of MCC, but much about its natural history and most effective treatment remains unknown. Surgical excision with margins of 1 to 2 cm remains first-line therapy for early-stage MCC, but robust evidence supporting immunotherapy for patients with advanced disease has led to recent approval of immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of advanced MCC. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Drew A. Emge, Adela R. Cardones Source Type: research

Erratum
An error was made in the July 2019 issue of Dermatologic Clinics (Volume 37, Issue 3) in article titled Extramammary Paget Disease, by Drs. Bradley Merritt, Catherine Degesys, and David Brodland regarding Figures 1 and 2. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

The Intersection of Dermatology and Oncology
DERMATOLOGIC CLINICS (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Lindsay C. Strowd Source Type: research

Copyright
ELSEVIER (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Contributors
BRUCE H. THIERS, MD (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Contents
Lindsay C. Strowd (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Forthcoming Issues
Phototherapy in the 21st Century (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Lymphomatoid Papulosis and Other Lymphoma-Like Diseases
Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta and pityriasis lichenoides chronica are the 2 main subtypes of pityriasis lichenoides. They represent the acute and chronic forms of the disease; both may have clonal T cells. Several treatment modalities are used, but it has been difficult to determine efficacy because of the possibility of spontaneous remission. Cutaneous CD30+  lymphoproliferative disorders constitute many cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and comprise lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Both have an excellent prognosis. Lymphomatoid papulosis often only requires...
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - August 6, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Adrian Moy, James Sun, Sophia Ma, Lucia Seminario-Vidal Source Type: research

Diagnosis and Management of Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphomas
Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a group of diseases with indolent and aggressive behavior. The goal of the initial workup is to evaluate for systemic involvement, provide adequate staging, and guide therapy. Histopathological studies are a critical part of the workup for classification of these lymphomas because they are similar to their nodal counterparts. There are limited data for treatment guidelines, and thus, therapy differs among institutions. Overall, localized therapies are preferred for indolent types and chemotherapy or immunotherapy for the aggressive forms. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - July 30, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Stephen J. Malachowski, James Sun, Pei-Ling Chen, Lucia Seminario-Vidal Source Type: research

Hereditary Tumor Syndromes with Skin Involvement
This article provides a brief description of the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of various inherited disorders with skin involvement, along with treatment updates. Advances in molecular-based therapy have spurred development of novel treatment methods for various genodermatoses such as xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Further studies are needed to better assess the efficacy of many of these new treatment options. (Source: Dermatologic Clinics)
Source: Dermatologic Clinics - July 30, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ramiz N. Hamid, Zeynep M. Akkurt Source Type: research