Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Multigene Panel Testing for Patients with Early-Onset Cancer of the Colon
In a recent note, I discused some theories about why the incidence of colonic cancer is increasing in younger patients (see:Why the Increased Incidence of Colonic Cancer Among Younger Americans?). Continuing in this same vein, a recent article I came across raised the issue of multigene panel testing to reveal genetic mutations in the roughly one-third of patents with early onset colonic cancer (see:Multigene Panel Testing Reveals Mutations in One-Third of Early Onset CRC Patients). Below is an excerpt from the article:Although the overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been decreasing in the Unite...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 7, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Research Preventive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Answering Your Colon Cancer Questions with Dr. Jiang
A new study released by the National Cancer Institute shows colon and rectal cancers have increased dramatically and steadily in young and middle-age adults in the United States over the past four decades. Dr. Yixing Jiang, a Medical Oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, answers all the questions you’re now asking yourself about colon cancer. Q. What are the risk factors for colon cancer? A. The risks for developing colon cancer are: obesity; insulin resistance diabetes, red and processed meat; tobacco; alcohol; family history of colorectal cancer; certain hereditary syndrom...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hannah Braun Tags: Cancer Health Tips colon cancer maryland research study treating colon cancer Source Type: blogs

Is aspirin a wonder drug?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Imagine that after years of painstaking research, scientists announced the development of a breakthrough treatment that costs pennies a pill, saves lives, and could reduce healthcare spending by nearly $700 billion in the coming years. And you wouldn’t even need a prescription to get it. Perhaps this all sounds too good to be true. But, according to a new study, we already have such a drug: it’s called aspirin. An analysis of aspirin use Based on current recommendations, only about 40% of people who should be taking aspirin are doing so. In this new report, researchers asked: ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Managing your health care Prevention Source Type: blogs

TBT: Which is More Uncomfortable – The Colonoscopy or Treatment for Colon Cancer?
March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month, today’s TBT post provides some helpful information on colorectal cancer. Michelle was a healthy, active 47 year old. She tried to eat right and she exercised. It looked like the hard work was paying off: no health issues and lots of energy. Her work in the healthcare field motivated her to see her doctors regularly for checkups, to get mammograms and to have her blood work done annually. She knew she was getting close to the magical age of 50 and that soon she would need to get a colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer.  Since she had no family history of the disease sh...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Cancer TBT Source Type: blogs

The Deadly Disease You Don’t Hear Enough About
Ovarian cancer is always the bridesmaid, never the bride. At weddings, there’s a reason we focus on the bride. It’s her big event. She’s the center of attention, and rightly so. But sometimes, the bridesmaid’s speech has more to tell us — and we should listen. We hear a lot about breast cancer. It affects a quarter of a million women and is fatal 15 to 20 percent of the time. Breast cancer is a serious and important disease that merits the time, money, and resources we spend on funding and public awareness each year. But what do you know about ovarian cancer, a disease with a fatality rate of ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - February 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Access Cancer Women Veterans Source Type: blogs

Which is More Uncomfortable: The Colonoscopy or Treatment for Colon Cancer?
Michelle was a healthy, active 47 year old. She tried to eat right and she exercised. It looked like the hard work was paying off: no health issues and lots of energy. Her work in the healthcare field motivated her to see her doctors regularly for checkups, to get mammograms and to have her blood work done annually. She knew she was getting close to the magical age of 50 and that soon she would need to get a colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer.  Since she had no family history of the disease she wasn’t worried. She felt certain that, just as all her previous testing had come back normal, this one would t...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - March 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

If PSA Tests Don't Impact Survival, Why Do Insurance Companies Do The Test Without Your Knowledge?
A discussion on Twitter caught the eyes of my colleagues yesterday, and raised a very interesting question: should insurance companies be allowed to do PSA testing to detect prostate cancer on men as a condition of getting insurance? What started the discussion was a blog post by a well-known and respected medical blogger who goes by the name "Skeptical Scalpel." In his blog he detailed the saga of a 56 year old man who had a pre-employment physical in order to be covered by his new company's health insurance plan. He was not informed that he was going to have a PSA test. It was just done as part of the process. ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 21, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Prostate Cancer Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs