New Treatment for Breast Cancer Could Help Some Women Avoid Surgery
Most women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer typically have surgery to remove the tumor, followed by three to six weeks of radiation. But there’s an exciting new development in breast cancer treatment – a first-of-its kind radiation therapy system for early stage cancers that may cut the number of treatments to only a few days. And, one day, the inventors say, it might even eliminate the need for surgery altogether for some patients. It’s called the GammaPod, invented by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently cleared the way...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Cancer breast cancer cancer treatment Cedric X. Yu Elizabeth Nichols GammaPod UMMC Source Type: blogs

Another Kind of Circulatory System
In the depths of the hospital, through doors that often go unnoticed by most employees, is a transportation system that plays a huge role in modern health care. The passengers are not people, although some are samples of people – blood samples, that is, secured in a “carrier” and on their way to the hospital lab. The carriers – cylindrical cartridges with a secure latch on each end — race all over the hospital through pneumatic tubes hidden deep behind the walls. Unit nurses can send samples to the lab for testing, or receive blood products and medications to administer to their patients. Pneu...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - January 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Miscellaneous Technology health care medical center pneumatics tube system UMMC University of Maryland Source Type: blogs

Over-bundling – What Every Parent Should Know
As the winter months approach, parents are preparing to keep their babies warm in fluffy coats and plenty of blankets. While it is important to keep babies comfortable in chilly conditions, babies cannot tell us when they start to feel too warm. Additionally, over-bundling can keep a child from being secure in a car seat. Here are some of the top dangers of over-bundling parents should be mindful of. Bulky clothes keep car seats from being secure:                                                  In ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - December 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Spreading Thanksgiving Cheer with a Thanksgiving Meal Spread
Between prepping, cooking, cleaning and entertaining, Thanksgiving sometimes turns into a high-stress holiday rather than a time for giving thanks. This time of year is already stressful for families at University of Maryland Children’s Hospital (UMCH), who spend the holidays at the hospital instead of at home. Members from the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club in Stevensville, Md. donated a Thanksgiving meal to all UMCH patients, families and staff members, to take one thing off of their plates for the holidays. Amanda Ackermann, a first year Child Life graduate student at Towson University and a Child Life Scholar at UMCH,...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - November 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Kids Chesapeake Bay Beach Club Child Life donation pediatrics Thanksgiving Source Type: blogs

Frequently Asked Questions-Daylight Saving Time and Kids
Adjusting to daylight saving time can be tough on kids. Dr. Adam Spanier answers some common questions about easing the transition during the time change.   1) What are some ways to prep kids for daylight saving time? Start to prepare in advance. First, encourage good bedtime routines and a good night’s sleep regularly. Second, ensure good sleep “hygiene.” Cut off electronics well before bed – the lights and stimulation can throw off our sleep cycle. Keep the lights low in the evening. Keep activities quieter. Third, you can gradually adjust bedtime ahead of the change – 10 minutes to 15 ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - November 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Living Legacy Foundation Donates iPhones to Bridge Program to Help Domestic Violence Victims
Bridge Program members with Tiffiny of the Living Legacy Foundation, who facilitated the donation. A phone is something many of us take for granted. However, to victims and survivors of domestic violence, a phone serves as their only connection to support and services to help break the cycle. Cell phones often are a target during the escalation of domestic violence, and unfortunately, cost is often a limiting factor in victim and survivor access to phones when a new one is needed. To help provide this lifeline to those in need, employees at the Living Legacy Foundation donated 26 iPhones to The Bridge Program at the Univer...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - October 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Admin Tags: Community Outreach patient care Patient Safety and Quality Service Social Work trauma Source Type: blogs

Benefits of a Certified Athletic Trainer On & Off the Field
University of Maryland’s Department of Orthopaedics provides state-of-the-art sports medicine care to athletes and active individuals of all ages on and off the field. Our sports medicine physicians and orthopaedic residents work directly with many of the athletic trainers in Baltimore County, Howard County, and Baltimore City to ensure the same level of care offered to the University of Maryland Terp athletes. Michael Smuda, MSAT, ATC, LAT is a certified atheltic trainer/physician extender with the University of Maryland Orthopaedics.  As fall sports are getting in full swing, he e...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - August 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Employees & Staff Health Tips Orthopaedics athletic trainer sports medicine sports performance Source Type: blogs

Setting Families Up for Breastfeeding Success
Every day, at 9 am and 9 pm, the nurses on the mother/baby unit at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) huddle for what they call the “Milk Minute.” They gather to exchange breastfeeding tips and other helpful information. This quick, daily training encourages communication between day and night shift staff, and keeps breastfeeding best practices top of mind. Why the emphasis on breastfeeding? It can significantly reduce infant mortality rates, as well as childhood obesity and related chronic diseases in adulthood. Based on research, staff has worked to modify practices in order to change the breast...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - August 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Doctors Health Tips Nurses Source Type: blogs

Shock Trauma ’s Violence Intervention Specialists Help Break the Cycle and Change Lives After Violent Injury
It’s heard in the news cycle pretty often in Baltimore – the victim of a gunshot wound or stabbing is taken to Shock Trauma, where they survive their injuries. However, it’s NOT often you hear about what happens to these survivors. How are they recovering from their injuries, mentally and emotionally? What are our teams doing to help them get access to resources to avoid violent injury again? That’s where Leonard Spain and David Ross come in.  They’re both Violence Intervention Case Managers at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.  Anytime someone suffers a violent injury ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - August 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Community Outreach Miscellaneous patient care Patient Safety and Quality Service Social Work trauma Baltimore baltimore violence shock trauma shooting Source Type: blogs

Birthday Surprise Lifts Spirits of Long-Term Cardiovascular Patient
Team members celebrate with Mr. Boyd When a hospital stay extends past six months, it can be hard to keep a patient thinking positively. Especially so on special days like birthdays. So, when Mr. Boyd, who has been in University of Maryland Medical Center’s in-patient Cardiac Progressive Care Unit for more than 250 days, had a birthday coming up, the unit staff knew they wanted to do something special. The team planned a surprise birthday party for weeks, raising money amongst themselves for decorations, food, and of course, a birthday cake. They also invited Mr. Boyd’s friends and family to join in the pa...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - July 31, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Employees & Staff Nurses Patient Stories Social Work Source Type: blogs

7 Things to Know About Glioblastoma
News recently shocked the nation that Sen. John McCain was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. Dr. Mark Mishra, a radiation oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and Maryland Proton Treatment Center who specializes in treating brain cancer, tells you 7 things to know about glioblastoma. How common is glioblastoma? Glioblastoma is the most common type of primary brain tumor that is diagnosed in adults.  There are estimated to be nearly 13,000 patients who will be diagnosed with a glioblastoma annually within the United States. Why is it so ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - July 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Sofia ’ s Lemonade Stand
Sofia Joslin, a seven year Patterson Park native and daughter of child life manager Shannon Joslin, has raised an incredible amount of money to support the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Sofia decided that the day her neighborhood was having a large scale yard sale day (3 blocks long), she would use the opportunity to help give back to kids who may not be as fortunate as herself. Sofia (left) and her friend pose with their lemonade stand they used for their donation to UMCH From there, Sofia gathered up her friends and they began to play a part in the process as well. Sofia and her friends sold all of th...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - July 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Uncategorized donation fundraiser UMCH Source Type: blogs

Where to go During an Emergency
Asthma attacks. Broken bones. Dehydration. Ear infections. Irregular heartbeat. Infectious diseases. Uncontrollable vomiting. This is a short list of the medical problems that are handled each year in the Pediatric Emergency Department at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Children and adults have different needs. This is why the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital has an exclusively pediatric emergency department staffed by highly experienced nurses and health care professionals trained to put children at ease. What makes this pediatric emergency department unique is the access to a l...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - July 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Emergencies doctor emergency kids pediatrics University of Maryland Hospital for Children Source Type: blogs

Men ’ s Health Month: Getting Back to the Basics
You know the type. The macho guy who’s rough, tough, go-it-alone, leader-of-the-pack, help-not-wanted. Macho man may put off seeing a doctor for a checkup – because he thinks he’s invincible, doesn’t get sick, it’s a waste of time, only for the weak. Physicians at the University of Maryland Medical Center say some men only give in when they have symptoms, when major treatments are required, or when preventive steps are more demanding. Even so, it’s never too late to start on the road to health. June, Men’s Health Month, is a great time to focus on preventable health problems and en...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Heart/Cardiac Care heart health mens health Source Type: blogs

Giving Back to The Hospital That Gave A Family So Much
Guest Blog By: Deb Montgomery, University of Maryland Children’s Hospital Parent My daughter, Neriah, has had many varied health issues over the course of her childhood, including severe asthma, allergies, gastrointenstinal issues, and more. We have been blessed to have her under the care of several of the doctors in the Pediatric Specialty Clinic at the University of Maryland Childnre’s Hospital (UMCH). During the past several years, we’ve been through a multitude of appointments, testing, and hospitalizations. As you can imagine, this has been really hard, and especially heartbreaking to see all that ou...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Community Outreach Hospitality Kids Miscellaneous patient care Patient Stories book drive children's hospital fundraising giving back maryland Source Type: blogs

What Parents Need to Know About Dry Drowning
Dr. Christian Wright is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and specializes in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Below he answers everything parents need to know about “dry drowning.” What is dry drowning? “Dry drowning” is actually an outdated term. These days, research and health organizations prefer to simply define drowning as a process where being submerged or immersed in liquid leads to respiratory impairment—that is, difficulty breathing. Drowning can be fatal or nonfatal. Sometimes a p...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids dry drowning emergency medicine kids water safety Source Type: blogs

What Parents Need to Know About Dry Drowning
Dr. Christian Wright is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and specializes in pediatric emergency medicine at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. Below he answers everything parents need to know about “dry drowning.” What is dry drowning? “Dry drowning” is actually an outdated term. These days, research and health organizations prefer to simply define drowning as a process where being submerged or immersed in liquid leads to respiratory impairment—that is, difficulty breathing. Drowning can be fatal or nonfatal. Sometimes a p...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids dry drowning emergency medicine kids water safety Source Type: blogs

Summer Safety: How to Treat Your Child ’s Cuts and Scrapes
More outdoor playtime usually brings more cuts and scrapes for kids. Here are some tips from the experts at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital on the best way to treat your child.   What’s the best way to treat a small cut or scrape? If the wound is bleeding, keep the area elevated and apply pressure to the site with a clean cloth or gauze. Most minor wounds will stop bleeding in about 5 to 10 minutes. Continue to hold pressure until the bleeding stops. After the bleeding stops, wash the wound with lots of water. Soaking the wound in water can be helpful if there is dirt or other debris in the ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health abrasions cuts scar scrapes skin Source Type: blogs

Summer Safety: How to Treat Your Child ’s Sunburn
Pool time and outdoor play may increase your child’s chance for developing sunburn. Here are some tips from the experts at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital on the best way to treat your child.   What causes sunburn? Sunburn appears within 6 to 12 hours after the skin is exposed to ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun. Artificial light sources like sun lamps and tanning beds can also cause sunburns. The skin becomes red and painful, and swelling of the skin, tenderness and blisters can develop. Severe sunburn can also cause nausea, chills and malaise (“feeling sick”). The burned area...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health risks skin sunburn sunscreen UV rays Source Type: blogs

A Gift of Thanks – 3 Years (and 43 Surgeries) Later
Three years ago, Grant Harrison was in a horrific motorcycle crash.  It was a bright sunny day on the Eastern Shore when a large deer struck the motorcycle Grant was riding.  He was airlifted to UMMC’s R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center with multiple life threating injuries. The fact that he is alive today is nothing short of astonishing. Grant had a fractured skull, severe traumatic brain injury, bleeding of the brain and severe injuries to his limbs. Grant spent 58 days on the Neurotrauma Critical Care Unit, and has had 43 surgeries on his road to recovery. Grant is a now a walking, talking (and hilarious...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Nurses Orthopaedics trauma shock trauma Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Orthopaedic Oncologist Dr. Vincent Ng
Dr. Vincent Ng is an orthopaedic oncologist with the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and an Assistant Professor or Orthopaedics with the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  Dr. Ng specializes in treating bone cancer and soft tissue sarcoma.  Below he answers common questions about orthopaedic oncology. What is an orthopaedic oncologist? How do they differ from surgical oncologists? “An orthopaedic oncologist specializes in bone and soft tissue tumors.  I treat any adult or pediatric patient with any bone or soft tissue tumor/lesion/mass, whether benign or malignan...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - June 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Cancer Doctors bone cancer oncology orthopedics Source Type: blogs

Mothers and Substance Use
By Christopher Welsh, MD Women have some unique challenges when it comes to alcohol, tobacco and drug use and misuse. These differences are based on both biology and culturally defined expectations of women. Hormonal changes, the menstrual cycle, fertility issues, pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause can all impact a woman’s use of substances. Women often use smaller amounts of a substance for shorter amounts of time before developing a problem. They also may have greater physical problems from their substance misuse. Alcohol, tobacco and drug use during pregnancy can present significant problems for both the ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Source Type: blogs

Physical Fitness and Sports Month: Commonly Asked Questions About Sports Injuries with Dr. Packer
Dr. Jonathan Packer is an orthopaedic surgeon with the University of Maryland Department of Orthopaedics and an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.  Dr. Packer specializes in sports medicine and is a Team Physician with the University of Maryland Terrapins.  Below he answers common questions about sports injuries. What are the most common sports-related injuries you see in your clinic? The most common sports related injuries are ankle sprains and contusions.  The most common knee injuries that I see are meniscus tears and knee ligament injuries, such as the M...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Doctors Employees & Staff Health Tips Orthopaedics Source Type: blogs

3 Things to Know about Mother-Child Relationships
By Sarah Edwards, DO Healthy moms = healthy children and families. Healthy moms are essential to building children’s healthy brains and helping everyone in the family grow well and love well. Maternal depression, anxiety and stress can affect how a mother interacts and develops a relationship with her baby. Babies need a safe and stable connection with a caregiver for social, emotional and cognitive development. If this attachment is not strong, it can have lasting effects on a child’s brain, and puts children at risk for behavior and emotional problems. Family bonding is key to a healthy family. The good news...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids Source Type: blogs

The Love Blanket Project Spreads Love Around UMCH
Love comes in many shapes and sizes, but for Robin Chiddo it’s square, 44×44 and fuzzy. Today, Robin from the Love Blanket Project dropped off 33 custom t-shirt blankets that will be given out to children staying at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. The Love Blanket Project started in 2015 when Robin, who recently retired from her position as director of business development at the UMD Alumni Association at College Park, was looking for a heartfelt gift for her sister. In her research, Robin also wanted to find a company that had a clear, mission-driven purpose—then she came across De...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Kids Child Life children's hospital Love Blanket Project Robin Chiddo UMCH Source Type: blogs

Going Above and Beyond to Ease the Stress of Blood & Marrow Transplant Patients
The facility where the stem cells are stored. The Blood and Marrow Transplant unit at the University of Maryland Medical Center was presented with a challenge in housing recovering cancer patients at the beginning of March 2017. Usually, UMMC and the BMT unit use The American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge to provide temporary housing for out-of-town BMT patients recovering from stem cell transplants. However, building construction began across the street from the Hope Lodge, making it unsafe for recovering BMT patients to stay there. Recovering from a stem cell transplant can be physically challenging, and construction...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Cancer Employees & Staff patient care Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mental Health Matters
MAY 3, 2017 IS WORLD MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS DAY #maternalMHmatters Today is World Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day, and we’re helping to bring attention to an important health issue and available treatment options. Worldwide, as many as one in five women experience some type of perinatal mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD). PMADs include postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, postpartum obsessive compulsive disorder and others. “There is still this myth that pregnancy is blissful and if you don’t enjoy pregnancy and having your baby, there’s something wrong with you,” says Patri...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Women's Health anxiety disorder maternal mental health mood disorder patricia widra PMAD Source Type: blogs

Fertility: 12 things you didn ’t know (and 1 to never ask)
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - May 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs

All About Infant Immunizations: Q & A with Pediatrician Dr. Adam Spanier
  Adam Spanier, MD, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Pediatrician with University of Maryland Medical Center. What vaccines are recommended for infants and children? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a group of medical and public health experts called the Advisory Committee of Immunization Practices. They develop and regularly review vaccine recommendations. Parents should talk to their pediatrician or family doctor, or reference the CDC or American Academy of Pediatrics. It’s important to know the vaccine schedule is ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - April 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Minority Health Month
By Jameson Roth, Communications Intern Each April marks the beginning of Minority Health Month at UMMC, when we strive to celebrate and acknowledge the initiatives in place to reduce health disparities among minority groups in the greater Baltimore area. UMMC also seeks to honor the service of the individuals who work tirelessly to bring these initiatives to deserving communities across the city. One of these hardworking individuals is Anne Williams, DNP, RN, whose current role is director of community health improvement at University of Maryland Medical Center. Williams perfectly sums up her mission at UMMC, “I am c...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - April 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Brain Injury Awareness Month
By Jameson Roth, Communications Intern At UMMC, we recognize individuals who have experienced Traumatic Brain Injury, directly and indirectly, throughout the month of March with the acknowledgment of Brain Injury Awareness Month. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is defined as a complex injury caused by an outside force on the brain, which can result in the permanent or temporary loss of brain functions. Individuals who have survived a TBI may experience symptoms such as memory loss, impaired cognition, headaches and mood swings following their injury. The leading causes of TBI include motor vehicle crashes, said Karen McQuill...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Employees & Staff Health Tips Neurology Patient Safety and Quality trauma Karen McQ TBI Traumatic Brain Injury Source Type: blogs

High Blood Pressure Has No Minimum
How tall is your child? How much does he or she weigh? Most parents can answer those questions easily. But here’s a tougher question: what is your child’s blood pressure? High blood pressure, or hypertension, is often considered an adult health problem. But this serious condition is no longer adults-only. “The number of children with high blood pressure is rising,” says Susan Mendley, MD, head of the Division of Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital and an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “Left unchecked...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What Can Women Do to Prevent Early Menopause?
About Early Menopause The average age a woman goes into menopause is 51. Menopause is considered abnormal when it begins before the age of 40 and is called “premature ovarian failure.” Common symptoms that come with menopause include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep problems, sexual issues, vaginal dryness, pain during sex, pelvic floor disorders (urine, bowel leakage, pelvic organ prolapse), losing bone mass, and mood swings. Menopause is mostly genetically predetermined, which means you generally can’t do much to delay it from happening. What we can do is work to counter-balance or prevent the symptoms ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: UMMC Tags: Health Tips Women's Health diet and exercise early menopause tatiana sanses Source Type: blogs

Child Life Month
How Play is Helping UMMC’s Youngest Patients By: Colleen Schmidt, System Communications Intern As many parents know, the hospital can be a scary and unfamiliar place for a child. To help relax these fears, UMMC’s team of child life specialists and assistants use a variety of techniques to help children adjust to the hospital setting. Child life specialists, or CLS, aim to provide a positive and non-traumatic hospital experience for all patients at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital.  UMMC’s Child Life team consists of six CLS and two assistants. They work in the Pediatric ...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hope Gamper Tags: Children's Health Emergencies Employees & Staff Kids patient care Patient Safety and Quality Patient Stories Source Type: blogs

Answering Your Colon Cancer Questions with Dr. Jiang
A new study released by the National Cancer Institute shows colon and rectal cancers have increased dramatically and steadily in young and middle-age adults in the United States over the past four decades. Dr. Yixing Jiang, a Medical Oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, answers all the questions you’re now asking yourself about colon cancer. Q. What are the risk factors for colon cancer? A. The risks for developing colon cancer are: obesity; insulin resistance diabetes, red and processed meat; tobacco; alcohol; family history of colorectal cancer; certain hereditary syndrom...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hannah Braun Tags: Cancer Health Tips colon cancer maryland research study treating colon cancer Source Type: blogs

Joint Replacement Q & A with Dr. Theodore Manson
Theodore Manson, MD is an Orthopaedic Surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center and an Associate Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Manson specializes in hip and knee replacements and orthopaedic trauma. Below he answers the most common questions about joint replacement.   Q. What advances have there been in joint replacements including new technologies, changes in patient-management and rehabilitation? A. One significant advancement in the last 10 years has been around pain management and early recovery protocols. The goal is to minimize the amount of narcotics...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - March 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hannah Braun Tags: Doctors Health Tips Orthopaedics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What To Ask Your Doctor (and Why) When You ’ ve Been Diagnosed With Lung Cancer
Heather Mannuel, MD, MBA is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Medical Oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Below are a few questions she says to ask your doctor when you’ve been diagnosed with lung cancer, and why they’re important to ask. What kind of lung cancer is this? Lung cancers are divided into small cell and non-small cell types, and the treatment is very different for each of these. What is my stage? The stage helps to give information on whether the cancer is only in the lung or whether it h...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Chris Lindsley Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

Winter Wives ’ Tale
The University of Maryland Children’s Hospital sets the record straight… “Put on your hat since you lose most of your body heat through your head.” This is not necessarily true! Your body heat escapes from any exposed area- so if you had on snow pants and a T-shirt and you forget your hat and jacket, the most amount of heat would escape through your arms- since that would be the largest exposed part of your body. Putting on winter accessories such as hats, mittens and scarves is still a very good idea to avoid the outside dangers of frostbite and hypothermia. “You will get sick if you go...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Chris Lindsley Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Kids pediatrics University of Maryland Children's Hospital University of Maryland Medical Center winter weather Source Type: blogs

Occupational Therapist Brings Holiday Cheer to NICU with Photo Shoot
Just before the holiday season, Lisa Glass, an occupational therapist in The Drs. Rouben and Violet Jiji Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) set up a Christmas photo shoot to show off the festive side of some of our tiniest patients. Glass, who enjoys photography in her spare time, developed the idea for the photo-shoot as a “cute way to give some nice holiday photos to parents”. Since NICU babies are often among the sickest children in the hospital, and need round the clock medical care, it can be difficult for parents to appreciate the traditional joys of having a newborn. Especially during the first few crit...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - January 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Chris Lindsley Tags: Employees & Staff Kids Occupational Therapy patient care Patient Stories Source Type: blogs

Working Hard to Engage West Baltimore Communities
Members from UMMC’s Community and Workforce Development and Commitment to Excellence teams visited Mr. Barnett’s 5th grade class at James McHenry Elementary/Middle School. The team dropped off 32 book bags (one for each student) filled with books and school supplies. Students also received holiday toys, donated by UMMC employees and staff. Additionally, through UMMC Commitment to Excellence holiday “Give Back Campaign”, UMMC employees and staff donated socks, undershirts, underwear, and other under garments to James McHenry Elementary/Middle School’s Uniform Closet. UMMC has officially &ldqu...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - December 30, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hope Gamper Tags: Community Outreach Kids C2X community engagement james mchenry UMMC Source Type: blogs

Setting the Table for Celiacs: Q & A with Celiac Disease Program ’s Nutritionist
University of Maryland Medical Center nutritionist Pam Cureton answers questions about celiac disease and gluten-free diets. Q: What is gluten? A: Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. These grains in any form must be avoided. Foods labeled gluten free are safe to eat but if a food item is not labeled gluten free look for these six words in the ingredient list to see if it contains a gluten containing ingredient: Wheat, Rye, Barley, Malt, Brewer’s yeast and Oat (only use oats that are labeled gluten free). Q: What exactly is wrong with gluten? A: The problem with gluten is that it is not completely brok...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - December 20, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Hope Gamper Tags: Children's Health Health Tips Nutrition celiac gluten gluten free Holidays Pam Cureton UMCH Source Type: blogs