Gordon Klatt, MD: We Mourn The Loss Of A True American Hero
We have lost a hero. A true hero. Not one whose name would be on the tip of everyone's tongue or whose passing would be on nationwide news, but a hero nonetheless. We have lost a man who possibly had more influence on the lives of cancer patients and advances in cancer than most of us will ever realize. Gordon (Gordy) Klatt, MD died this week. A colorectal surgeon who lived in Tacoma, Washington, Dr. Klatt died from the very disease which he did so much to eradicate. And even while ill, he contributed time and effort tirelessly to the American Cancer Society and the very volunteers-like himself-who do so much to reduce the...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 7, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Prevention Research Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Ultraviolet Bad: Surgeon General Issues A Call To Action To Prevent Skin Cancer
(Note: This blog was originally published on another American Cancer Society website on July 29 because of technical problems on this site. Those have now been resolved and it is now reposted here. We appreciate your understanding.)   "Ultraviolet bad." That was the core message that came out of the introduction Tuesday morning of the Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer at a meeting held at the National Press Club in Washington DC. There were some other messages that now raise skin cancer awareness and prevention high on the public health awareness list, such as the fact that over 5 million people ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - July 31, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Diet Early detection Environment Exercise Melanoma Prevention Research Screening Skin Cancer Survivors Vitamins Source Type: blogs

Cancer and the Latino Community: Lessons Learned
I had the privilege this week to serve as the keynote speaker for the 4th Summit sponsored by Latinas Contra Cancer-an organization founded and led by Ysabel Duron, a formidable cancer survivor and news media presence in San Francisco. Bringing together members of the Latino community, researchers, community health workers, promotores (more on that later) and advocates, the summit focused on the issues facing the Latino community in increasing awareness, access to care, improved treatment and research opportunities among other topics. But what was most impressive was the spirit, engagement and commitment that permeated the...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - July 24, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Diet Early detection Environment Prevention Prostate Cancer Research Screening Tobacco Source Type: blogs

Social Media And Cancer Awareness: Are We Smart Enough To Take Advantage Of The Opportunity?
This past week I had the privilege of participating in a meeting hosted by the President's Cancer Panel on the role of social media in improving cancer control and treatment. The goal was to give advice to the Panel on a planned series of meetings they will be convening to discuss the topic. It was the range and quality of the discussion that day that left me thinking about the broader topic of social media and how it could help improve cancer control going forward. I do not profess to be a social media expert. I do (obviously) engage in social media in a couple of ways, primarily through my blogs and Twitter (@DrLen), bu...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 17, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Colon Cancer Diet Early detection Heatlh Information Technology Media Prevention Research Screening Survivors Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

Lung-MAP--A Bold Initiative To Find New Treatments For Squamous Cell Lung Cancer--Launches Today
Today marks a major step forward in cancer clinical trials and drug development with the launch of the Lung-MAP protocol to evaluate new treatments for squamous cell lung cancer, a common cancer which has proven resistant to the standard drugs currently available. In response to this genuine unmet need, Lung-MAP has been designed to move new therapies more quickly from the laboratory to the bedside of patients afflicted with this serious disease and few options available. Many--including present company--have written about the need to improve this process. We are in a new era of cancer drug development, spearheaded by our ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 16, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Lung Cancer Medications Research Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

ASCO 2014 Is A Wrap: If Immunotherapy Is The Queen Of The Ball, Then Panomics Holds The Keys To The Kingdom
As in years past, the trip home from the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago gives me a moment to reflect on what I have heard and hopefully learned over the past five days. This meeting is a whirlwind of activity and information, far too much for any one person to absorb and process. You can be focused on one topic, you can be general, and you can hear new cutting edge research or be educated on topics of general interest in cancer. You can go to the exhibit hall and be overwhelmed by the booths and displays (I tend not to go there, but obviously many others do). I suspect you get the id...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Heatlh Information Technology Lung Cancer Media Medications Melanoma Other cancers Research Skin Cancer Treatment Source Type: blogs

The Picture With The Smile That Says So Much About Advances In Cancer Care
It was the picture (see below) that, to me, said it all: a 96 year old woman -- one of the first patients in the world to receive a brand new cancer drug--, and a large tumor on her neck had melted completely away. But it was the smile on her lips that you couldn't avoid noticing. Let's set the stage: You have spent the last 5 days in a large convention center at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago running from presentation to presentation and meeting to meeting. You have heard more information presented in more rapid fire sequence than any human being can possibly absorb. You h...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 4, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Media Medicare Medications Melanoma Other cancers Research Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Big Steps Forward In Melanoma Treatment But Tread Carefully
In this study, which is billed as the largest phase I (initial) drug trial ever done, 411 patients received the drug. 34% of the patients-including patients who had received prior immune treatment using a different approach-responded. In those patients who responded, 88% continued to show evidence of benefit at the time the study was analyzed. The researchers estimated that 74% of the patients who had not received prior treatment with ipilimumab would be alive at one year, while the one year survival for those who had received prior ipilimumab was 65%. In another report, researchers described a study which included a small...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 2, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Medications Research Skin Cancer Treatment Source Type: blogs

In An Era Of Bold New Cancer Treatments An Older Drug Shows Real Promise For Advanced Prostate Cancer
The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here in Chicago is a place where many commercial interests jostle for attention to make their latest promising therapy the star of the show. But this weekend, a standard widely available generic drug stole the show by producing incredible results in improving survival for men with advanced prostate cancer. And that has some of us asking, "Why did it take so long to find out? The drug is docetaxel, which for decades has been used to treat a number of cancers, including prostate cancers. We have known for some time that it is helpful in the treatment of men who...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 2, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Medications Prostate Cancer Treatment Source Type: blogs

From The ASCO Meeting In Chicago: A Focus On Cost, Value, And Financial Toxicity Of Cancer Care
At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) here in Chicago, something vitally important is happening: there is an increasing recognition of something no one really wanted to talk about in polite company until now. It is the fact that the costs of many of the new treatments being developed are extraordinary. The headlines about cost and value of cancer care greeted me when I walked into the McCormick Center in Chicago for the opening sessions of the meeting. This is the leading cancer meeting in the world, and what happens here makes news worldwide, significantly impacting the lives of patient...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 31, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Early detection Heatlh Information Technology Media Medications Research Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

The FDA Lays Down The Law About The Dangers Of Indoor Tanning
In what has to be considered a major victory for those concerned about the proliferating use and risks of tanning beds, the Food and Drug Administration this week issued a final rule requiring devices used for indoor tanning to meet very specific requirements before they can be marketed to the public. And in what is probably an even more important part of the rule, they now instruct those who market tanning devices to consumers to warn them clearly about the very real and serious risks of indoor tanning. What this means in plain terms is that if you use a tanning bed you will have to see a clearly defined boxed warning be...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 29, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Early detection Environment Prevention Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Progress In Colorectal Cancer Not Shared By Everyone
An article published this week in the American Cancer Society journal CA: A Journal for Clinicians received a lot of media attention. The report showed dramatic declines in the rate of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer, as well as decreases in the rates of colorectal cancer deaths over the past number of years. But the press didn't say much about the fact that not everyone has benefitted from the progress we have made in the prevention, early detection, and improved treatment for colorectal cancer. It is a sad but very real commentary on how we approach health care in this country that African Americans have no...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - March 19, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Colon Cancer Diet Early detection Environment Media Medicare Medications Prevention Rectal Cancer Research Screening Treatment Source Type: blogs

It Helps To Know What Watchful Waiting Really Means In Prostate Cancer Treatment
News reports covering a prostate cancer study this week in the New England Journal of Medicine have all pretty much come out with the same message: men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had radical surgery did much better than men who were assigned to "watchful waiting" after they were diagnosed. But guess what? There's a critical fact that seemed to be missing in much of the coverage I saw. And that fact is this: the men who were given the "watchful waiting" as described in the study never received any curative treatment. Let me repeat: No curative treatment. That is a much different approach to watchful waiting than we ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - March 6, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Medications Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy Research Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

One Doctor's Confession: Basal And Squamous Cell Skin Cancers Are NOT Benign
I have made a resolution for 2014: I will never, never, never again call basal and squamous skin cancers "benign" cancers. Why would I make such a strange commitment? The explanation is simple:  I spent 4 hours on New Year's Eve sitting in the surgeon's chair getting a skin cancer taken off my nose. Nothing about the experience fits the "benign" label so many professionals, including yours truly, have used:  routine; easy to treat; nothing to worry about.  Friends, after this experience, which left me looking like a tall, white-haired Rudolph the Reindeer, I am here to tell you these cancers are not to be tr...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - January 7, 2014 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Environment Exercise Other cancers Prevention Screening Treatment Source Type: blogs

The Flu Is One Gift That We Don't Have To Keep On Giving For People With Cancer
  It's the holiday season, a time of reflection, celebration and for many, giving gifts. But there is at least one gift that no one wants to get, and certainly no one wants to give: the flu. And for people with cancer, and those they come in contact with, the flu can be a very serious event. For that reason and many more, people more than 6 months old-and especially those in contact with people who have serious illnesses like cancer-should get vaccinated against the flu. Too many of us think the flu is a minor inconvenience. But that is almost certainly because we confuse the typical cold or upper respiratory infectio...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - December 17, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Environment Medications Prevention Survivors Treatment Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Personalized Medicine Revolution Will Require Revolutionary Changes In How We Care For Cancer Patients
I attended a meeting in Washington this past Wednesday that got me to thinking about the fact that as we revolutionize cancer research and treatment, we are also going to have to revolutionize cancer care. And that  may prove to be an even more daunting task than finding new treatments for the disease itself. The meeting was sponsored by a collaboration called "Turning The Tide Against Cancer". The organizers brought together experts from a variety of disciplines ranging from insurance companies and economists to advocacy groups and highly regarded cancer specialists to discuss policy solutions to support innovation i...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - October 18, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Early detection Medications Prevention Research Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

If PSA Tests Don't Impact Survival, Why Do Insurance Companies Do The Test Without Your Knowledge?
A discussion on Twitter caught the eyes of my colleagues yesterday, and raised a very interesting question: should insurance companies be allowed to do PSA testing to detect prostate cancer on men as a condition of getting insurance? What started the discussion was a blog post by a well-known and respected medical blogger who goes by the name "Skeptical Scalpel." In his blog he detailed the saga of a 56 year old man who had a pre-employment physical in order to be covered by his new company's health insurance plan. He was not informed that he was going to have a PSA test. It was just done as part of the process. No informe...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 21, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Prostate Cancer Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

New Update On Prostate Cancer Prevention With Finasteride Creates A Dilemma For Patients
  We've all heard the phrase, "When you come to a fork in the road, take it."  Well, that saying may hold particular relevance while reviewing a new research report published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The report is an important one. It is an 18 year follow-up of a study designed to show whether the use of the drug finasteride could reduce the incidence and deaths from prostate cancer. The study was called the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial and when it was initially reported in 2003 it showed that the drug could reduce the incidence of prostate cancer by almost 25%.  However, there was a...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 14, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Medications Prevention Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy Research Screening Treatment Source Type: blogs

Palliative Care Is About Quality Of Life Throughout The Cancer Journey
A newspaper story last week caught my eye when it headlined: "Senators Revive Push for End-of-Life-Care Planning." It reported on new legislation making the rounds in Washington to address care planning for those with advanced illnesses. You remember "end of life care planning," don't you? It was part of the Affordable Care Act debate several years ago, and quickly became translated into "death panels" where opponents made the argument that the government wanted to help people decide not to receive needed treatment. That was a moment that will live in my memory forever, and it's not a pleasant memory. So here we are with t...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 9, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Lung Cancer Media Other cancers Prostate Cancer Rectal Cancer Research Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Big Data And The Transformation Of Health Care: Promise Or Peril?
There was a memorable scene in the movie "The Graduate" from 1967. You may know it or have heard of it, when the older man turns to the college graduate and says the future is all about one word: "plastics." Well, plastics may have been then, but this is now. And the core themes I keep hearing these days there are two central ones that our becoming our new "plastics" in medicine: genomics and big data. Words that didn't mean much to most people a year or so ago now occupy front and center discussions at every level, not to mention are the topics of a number of meetings I have attended recently. This past week I went to one...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - August 6, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Media Medicare Research Source Type: blogs

Want To Help Make This Cancer's Last Century? Then Sign Up For Cancer Prevention Study 3
How often do people say they wish they could do something to help rid the world of cancer? Fortunately, there are real ways to make an impact,, from making a contribution to an organization like the American Cancer Society, to volunteering in a local program, to engaging in a local fund raising event. But I have another suggestion sign up for the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3). Recruitment is currently underway in cities nationwide, and we are on the final push to enlist 300,000 people in the United States between the ages of 30 and 65 who have never had cancer to help us advance our knowledge ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - July 16, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Source Type: blogs

They Are YOUR Medical Records. Will The Blue Button Help You Get Them?
  It is a disarmingly simple idea: create a blue button logo with a download moniker on it and let it loose so people can actually download, review, and keep their own medical records. But simple on the surface masks complexity below a revolutionary concept: that patients are not only the subject of the records, but that they own those records, and through that ownership can actually be partners in their care or even improve their own health. That was the topic of a meeting I attended yesterday at the White House, where representatives of government, health technology vendors, consumer groups, and others interested in...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 7, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Medicare Treatment Source Type: blogs

It's Guns vs. Butter (Again): How Do We Reconcile Expensive Cancer Treatments With The Need To Improve The Basics Of Cancer Care?
As we walk the halls and sit in the lectures at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, there's an elephant in the room. It is right there in front of us, but not many of us seem willing to talk about it. Fewer still are making any commitments to do something about it. So what is this ubiquitous juxtaposition that is right in front of us but we can't seem to see? It is the contrast between incredibly sophisticated science and computer data that will help us understand cancer and its treatment vs. the reality that we can't have medical records that really work. It is the fact that we have million do...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 3, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Early detection Prevention Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy Rectal Cancer Research Screening Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

Maybe It Really Is Different This Time For Patients With Advanced Melanoma
Every convention and large meeting has a theme, and at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago the theme is "Building Bridges To Conquer Cancer." But for me, the theme as articulated in my blog the other day is "Is it really different this time?" Some agree with me and some don't, but that's OK. I am wearing a badge that says I am a "35 year member of ASCO" (I actually have been attending these meetings longer than that) so I perhaps have a bit of a different perspective than those younger than me. And there is plenty of commentary to back up my well-meaning and hopefully thought provokin...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 3, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Medications Other cancers Research Survivors Treatment Vaccines Source Type: blogs

Genomics And Personalized Medicine: Is It Really Different This Time?
Another year and another annual meeting for the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. This is a meeting that regularly attracts many thousands of doctors, researchers, pharmaceutical folks and others interested in the science and business of cancer from around the globe to learn, to discuss, to persuade, to educate on the progress being made in clinical cancer research and treatment. And like every year, there are themes that emerge, that tend to dominate the discussions. And there are other themes that aren't so visible, that don't get as much attention yet in my mind are equally important as they reflect not ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - June 1, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Breast Cancer Cancer Care Colon Cancer Lung Cancer Medications Research Treatment Vaccines Source Type: blogs

On "Don't Fry Day" Remember To Be Safe In The Sun: You Can Fry Your Chicken But Don't Fry Yourself
Today is the beginning of Memorial Day weekend and the summer holiday season. It's a day to remember to enjoy your fried chicken, while not frying your skin. (OK, fried chicken isn't exactly healthy for you, but it is fun once in a while. Frying your skin is never healthy nor fun). It is also Don't Fry Day, an annual reminder of the need to be sun safe while we enjoy the outdoors during the summer months. Don't Fry Day is a concept led by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention and its many collaborating organizations including the American Cancer Society. The messages from the Council are simple and straightforwar...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 24, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Other cancers Prevention Vitamins Source Type: blogs

American Cancer Society Celebrates Its 100 Year Anniversary Today With A Vision Of Making This Century Cancer's Last
One hundred years. That is a long time. And although thriving, remaining relevant and engaged for 100 years is a remarkable accomplishment for any organization, the American Cancer Society today takes pride not only in reflecting on the accomplishments of the last 100 years but also in our commitment to continue the fight, and make this century cancer's last. A lot will be written about the remarkable accomplishments of the Society over the past century. The American Cancer Society takes pride in the fact that it has been able to serve millions of people during that time. It has put its mark on numerous improvements in the...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 22, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Diet Early detection Lung Cancer Media Prevention Prostate Cancer Research Screening Survivors Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

Dr. Len Says: When It Comes To Skin Cancer, Do As I Say, Not As I Do
So May is skin cancer awareness month. No time like the present to come out with the news: I have been diagnosed with skin cancer. There really isn't much special about that, since it is a distinction I share with over 2 million Americans who have a skin cancer removed every year. Fortunately, for most, it is a cancer that is not of particular concern since most can be removed. But even those "simple" surgeries--as I have learned from my own experience--can be a bit problematic. Occasionally it helps to find some humor in difficult situations, and this is one of those times. And since I am generally pretty open about what ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 14, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Environment Other cancers Prevention Screening Treatment Source Type: blogs

A New Genomic Test To Guide Prostate Cancer Treatment: What We Know And What We Don't
Coming to an office near you: a new test that can "confidently" predict whether or not you need to have aggressive therapy for your newly diagnosed prostate cancer. Really? That's what the press reports would lead you to believe. And it's really going to catch your attention if you're one of the tens of thousands of men who will have to decide what to do if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer that has what we call "favorable characteristics." And with the test coming to market, you would assume that your doctor would have a good understanding of whether or not it works based on the available studies and information...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - May 9, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Media Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy Research Screening Treatment Source Type: blogs

National Minority Health Month Is A Call To Action
April is National Minority Health Month. That's the "dry" statement. The impact statement is that-unfortunately-for many in this country, this is more than a phrase. It's a reality that their health and their health care are in crisis. And the sooner more of us understand this, the sooner we can make a genuine effort to implement effective strategies that will address the sad state of affairs many people find themselves in when it comes to their health, and preventing and appropriately treating their diseases. This is about more than high blood pressure and diabetes. It's about heart disease and stroke and cancer and the l...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - April 18, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Early detection Environment Prevention Screening Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Is Cancer Research and Treatment Moving From Evolution To Revolution?
Discussion at a meeting of the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) held in conjunction with the MD Anderson symposium mentioned above echoed a theme that I truly believe in: we have plenty of money "in the system" already to accomplish what we need to accomplish. How we parcel out that money is the issue. We waste so much, and we are charged so much, for things that don't work or aren't needed that to me it borders on the obscene. If we were more effective and efficient at what we do and how we do it, I firmly believe we could pay for what we need to pay for. As an example, I was asked this week about a recent d...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - April 9, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Breast Cancer Cancer Care Colon Cancer Lung Cancer Media Medications Other cancers Prostate Cancer Research Treatment Source Type: blogs

Maybe It's Time To Rethink Patient Safety When 1/3 Of The Cancer Professionals Would Have Prescribed The Wrong Treatment In Response To A Lecturer's Question
I was sitting in a large lecture hall with about 1000 of my oncology colleagues this past week when I had one of "those moments." It wasn't a spectacular moment, and I doubt that anyone else in the room really paid much attention to the moment, but for me it was a significant moment--and frankly a bit chilling if not frightening. In short, in answer to an audience response question--which admittedly is not a scientifically valid survey--over 1/3 of the oncology professionals sitting in the audience would have prescribed a treatment for advanced colon cancer that not only has been shown not to work, but also shorten lives. ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - March 20, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Breast Cancer Cancer Care Colon Cancer Medications Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Two New Reports From eHealth Initiative Provide Valuable Information On eHealth Tools For Cancer Patients
Since we have started the conversation about eHealth tools in my previous blog this week, I thought it might be worthwhile to explore some of the other applications and internet based programs that may be useful to cancer patients. As I wrote in early February, I have become (and remain) infatuated with apps that have helped me track my activity and my diet. They have made a big difference for me and others I know, and continue to keep me motivated and on target. The larger question, however, is whether we can harness electronic media to help us live healthier lives, get better control of our health, or if we have an illne...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - March 8, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Cancer Care Media Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

For Cancer Patients, It's Not Just About What's Now But Also What's Next--And We Can Help Answer That Question
Here's an insightful comment from me: Social media has gripped our world, the way we live, the way we interact, what we know and influences what we do. (OK, stop laughing: I'm not a Luddite, but needed somewhere to start this conversation.) At times, I wonder where all those folks (usually young folks) find all that interesting stuff they send to each other on a such a constant basis that it seems their smartphones are a direct extension of their fingertips. So much to say right now! I can't imagine there being that much that is so important that people walk down the street mesmerized by those things. But maybe that is jus...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - March 6, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Medications Research Survivors Treatment Source Type: blogs

Will My Smartphone Help Me End The Purgatory Of My Groundhog Day Diet?
OK. So Groundhog Day was on Saturday this year, and unlike the furry little beast what I have to say each year around this time is just as good today as him looking for his shadow on Saturday. What is all this about, you are probably asking yourself? It is about an annual update that I started a couple of years ago on my blog to remind myself and those who are interested that losing weight and staying healthy is a tough slog and a major commitment which too often is not successful. Like many of you out there I am not immune to all the problems surrounding diet and trying to get weight under control. Try, try, try again and...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - February 4, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Diet Environment Prevention Vitamins Source Type: blogs

New Report On Smoking In Women Confirms That "Women Who Smoke Like Men Die Like Men"
In this study, it is the relative risk that is being discussed. The baseline death rates for certain diseases and men and women may be different, but in both sexes the relative risk increase is what they are measuring-not the actual increase in the number of deaths from a particular disease.     (Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog)
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - January 23, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Lung Cancer Prevention Tobacco Source Type: blogs

New Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines From The American Cancer Society: What You Should Know
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in this country. In 2012, the American Cancer Society estimates that there were about 226,000 people newly diganosed with lung cancer, and 160,000 deaths. If there is good news here-and unfortunately there isn't much good news when it comes to lung cancer-it is that deaths from this dreaded disease have been declining in men and women, since fewer people are smoking. But there is much we have to do to improve this picture. That's one of the reasons the American Cancer Society is releasing new guidelines on screening for lung cancer. After carefully reviewing the availa...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - January 10, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Cancer Care Early detection Lung Cancer Prevention Screening Tobacco Treatment Source Type: blogs

Annual Report to the Nation on Cancer Trends: Cancer Deaths Continue to Fall, But We Can Do Better
This report comes out every year. It is a summation of what we know about the trends in incidence rates for the most common cancers in the United States among both men and women as well as the trends in death rates from those cancers that lead to the highest mortality in the general population as well as specific ethnic groups. It is in a real sense a report card on our progress, which in large part is good but in a number of cancers, not so good. The good news is what we have come to expect: since the year 2000, the overall cancer death rates have continued to decline 1.8% per year in men, 1.4% in women and 0.6% per year ...
Source: Dr. Len's Cancer Blog - January 7, 2013 Category: Cancer Authors: Dr. Len Tags: Access to care Breast Cancer Cancer Care Cervical Cancer Colon Cancer Early detection Lung Cancer Other cancers Prevention Prostate Cancer Rectal Cancer Research Screening Tobacco Treatment Vaccines Source Type: blogs