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Lingzhi mushrooms combat aging, disease and even cancer
(NaturalNews) The Lingzhi mushroom, also known as Ganoderma lucidum or Reishi, has been used for ages in traditional Asian medicine to treat a host of health conditions and promote longevity. Often referred to as the “king of mushrooms,” this edible medicinal fungus is well known to boost anti-inflammatory properties, immune function, liver health and mental... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two cases of incidental Podostroma cornu-damae poisoning - Kim HN, Do HH, Seo JS, Kim HY.
Podostroma cornu-damae is a rare, deadly fungus. However, it can be easily mistaken for antler Ganoderma lucidum. In this case report, two patients made tea with the fungus and drank it over a 2-week period. Both patients presented with bicytopenia, and on... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 9, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Mushroom supplement could be one way to tackle obesity
Conclusion This study of Ganoderma lucidum in mice eating a high-fat diet found that it may help to reduce weight and fat gain, reduce inflammation and improve the levels of "good" gut bacteria in the gut. It also appeared to reduce the risk of insulin resistance. Ganoderma lucidum was not seen to have a significant effect for mice fed a normal diet. The results of this study suggest a possible use for the extract, but randomised controlled trials in humans are required to determine safety and effectiveness for preventing weight gain. The same is true for any other conditions that Ganoderma lucidum is curren...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Obesity Source Type: news

Could mushrooms be the cure for cancer?
Mushrooms are being hailed as a miracle cure for cancer. But can a shiitake stir-fry really work wonders?Behold the mighty mushroom. Neither plant nor animal, the mysterious fungus is a class, or kingdom, of its own, and has fascinated cultures around the world for centuries. But while they do make a tasty omelette filling, does the real magic of mushrooms lie not in their flavour, but in their potential to combat one of our biggest killers – cancer?The ancient Egyptians believed eating mushrooms brought long life. While their scientific method was perhaps not entirely sound, modern scientists investigating the medic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 2, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Jenkin Tags: Nutrition The Guardian Health & wellbeing Food drink Society Features Cancer Life and style Science Source Type: news