Correlation between vitamin D and alterations in MRI among patients with multiple sclerosis

Ann Agric Environ Med. 2021 Sep 16;28(3):372-377. doi: 10.26444/aaem/127062. Epub 2020 Sep 17.ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of unknown etiology. Diagnosis of MS is primarily based on detection of myelin damage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and classification of demyelination according to the McDonald Criteria. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) has been shown to affect the onset and progression of MS via its immunomodulating properties. The role of vitamin D in MS pathogenesis and treatment deserves further investigation, as there is sufficient evidence to suggest a correlation between vitamin D blood level and brain MRI lesion load.STATE OF KNOWLEDGE: Elevated blood vitamin D concentration is linked with demyelination, as determined by T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Blood vitamin D blood levels are affected by sun exposure, among other factors; however, there is no evident connection between abnormalities in myelination and seasonality. Vitamin D supplementation among MS patients has been associated with a lower probability of new lesions and loss of existing lesion volume, as observed seen in T1-weighted MRI scans (p=0.03). An increase in TGF-beta levels was noted among patients using vitamin D supplementation, which may suggest a mechanism by which cholecalciferol may improve MS prognosis. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) exhibited an inverse correlation between vitamin D concentration and risk of new lesions as seen i...
Source: Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine : AAEM - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: research

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There is growing interest in imaging multiple sclerosis (MS) through the ultra-high-field (UHF) lens, which currently means a static magnetic field strength of 7 T or higher. Because of higher signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced susceptibility effects, UHF magnetic resonance imaging improves conspicuity of MS pathological hallmarks, among them cortical demyelination and the central vein sign. This could, in turn, improve confidence in MS diagnosis and might also facilitate therapeutic monitoring of MS patients. Furthermore, UHF imaging offers unique insight into iron-related pathology, leptomeningeal inflammation, and spina...
Source: Investigative Radiology - Category: Radiology Tags: Specialty Topic Review Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionThe performance of the CNN improved significantly for infratentorial lesions when specifically trained on infratentorial lesions using a T1 image as an additional input and matches the detection performance of experienced raters. Furthermore, for infratentorial lesions the CNN was more robust against repeated scans than experienced raters.Key Points•A 3D convolutional neural network was trained on MRI data from 1809 patients (156 different scanners) for the quantification of supratentorial and infratentorial multiple sclerosis lesions.•Inter-rater variability was higher for infratentorial lesions than f...
Source: European Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Conclusions3D-FLAIR2 is an easily applicable time-sparing MR post-processing method to improve cortical lesion detection. Larger sampled studies are warranted to validate the sensitivity and specificity of 3D-FLAIR2.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: A deep learning model that improves the image quality of the accelerated routine clinical brain MR scans has the potential to inform clinically relevant outcomes in MS.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Ann Agric Environ Med. 2021 Sep 16;28(3):372-377. doi: 10.26444/aaem/127062. Epub 2020 Sep 17.ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of unknown etiology. Diagnosis of MS is primarily based on detection of myelin damage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and classification of demyelination according to the McDonald Criteria. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) has been shown to affect the onset and progression of MS via its immunomodulating properties. The role of vitamin D in MS pathogenesis and treatment deserves further investigation, as there is sufficient evidence to suggest a correlation between vitamin ...
Source: Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine : AAEM - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: research
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