COVID-19 Recovery Requires Justice Beyond Rhetoric

Credit: Global Policy ForumBy Jens MartensBONN, Germany, Sep 16 2021 (IPS) Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic crisis have exacerbated rather than reduced global inequalities. On the one hand, the net wealth of billionaires has risen to record levels since the outbreak of the pandemic (increasing by more than US$ 5 trillion to US$ 13.1 trillion from 2020 to 2021), on the other hand, the number of people living in extreme poverty has also increased massively (by approx. 100 million to 732 million in 2020). These contrasts alone show that something is fundamentally wrong in the world. In response to the disastrous effects of the pandemic, there was much talk of solidarity with regard to health support, including access to vaccines. But the brutal national competition for vaccines shows that solidarity is embraced by many world leaders merely as a rhetorical flourish. The World Health Organization (WHO) made an early appeal to countries to agree on a coordinated distribution of vaccines, with available doses distributed fairly according to the size of each country’s population. This has not happened. By the end of August 2021, more than 60 percent of the people in high-income countries had received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, but less than 2 percent have done so in low-income countries. The European Commission, the USA, the UK, and numerous other countries have signed bilateral COVID-19 Vaccine Agreements with pharmaceutical pro...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Economy & Trade Education Gender Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women & Economy Source Type: news

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Shannon Jensen was diligent about making sure her sons wore masks to school when classes resumed in September. Other parents in Waukesha, Wis., weren’t. And three weeks after school opened, Jensen’s eldest son, who was seated next to an unmasked classmate who had COVID-19 symptoms, fell ill with the virus. Soon, another of her boys had tested positive, according to a lawsuit that marks a new twist in the ongoing battle over what schools should be doing to protect children from the coronavirus. While parents across the country have filed lawsuits against states and school districts to protest mask mandates, Jens...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Education nationpod News Source Type: news
For much of the pandemic, Aotearoa New Zealand’s COVID-19 response has ranked as one of the best in the world. We have been living in a parallel world, one of a small handful of countries to follow an elimination strategy. That strategy has meant that we have had very few COVID-19 cases and deaths. And when I say very few, I mean it. Until August this year, there had been just over 2,800 confirmed cases and 26 deaths. We have lived much of the pandemic with daily life almost unrestricted. As someone who follows the global situation closely it has been surreal. I’ve spent much of this pandemic worried that New Z...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (October 12, 2021) – Johnson &Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced that Paul Stoffels M.D., currently Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer of Johnson &Johnson, will retire from the Company effective December 31, 2021.As the Vice Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Stoffels spearheaded the company’s research and product pipeline leading teams across sectors to set the company-wide mandate to discover and develop transformational healthcare solutions. Under his leadership, Johnson &Johnson revitalized its innovation ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: Outbreak response vaccination campaigns against cVDPV2 will be challenging throughout the COVID-19 pandemic but must be implemented urgently when feasible to stop transmission of cVDPV2.PMID:34629206 | DOI:10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.09.037
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: From the 3-month interim analysis, the vaccine exhibited a 65.30% efficacy at preventing COVID-19 illness with favorable safety and immunogenicity profiles.PMID:34620531 | DOI:10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.09.052
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractOn 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) outbreak a pandemic. In this context, several studies and clinical trials have been conducted since then, and many are currently ongoing, leading to the development of several COVID-19 vaccines with different mechanisms of action. People affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) have been considered high-risk subjects in most countries and prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination. However, the management of MS during the COVID-19 pandemic has represented a new challenge for MS specialists, particularly because of the initial lack o...
Source: Neurology and Therapy - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
On Oct. 6, the World Health Organization recommended use of the first vaccine to fight malaria. The decision is momentous and highly anticipated for many reasons: among them is that this is the first vaccine to help reduce the risk of deadly severe malaria in young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease remains a leading killer. The vaccine offers hope that there can be a circle of learning from one pandemic to the next. Malaria, our oldest pandemic, may offer insights on how we can survive contemporary scourges like COVID-19. Malaria evolved at least 2.5 million years ago and first infected humans in rural part...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
This study assessed the number of COVID-19 cases and potential secondary spread among 7,173 staff members and campers from 50 states, 13 countries, and U.S. military overseas bases at nine independently operated U.S. summer youth camps affiliated with the same organization. The camps implemented multiple prevention strategies including vaccination, testing, podding (cohorting), masking, physical distancing, and hand hygiene during June-August 2021. Vaccination coverage was 93% among eligible persons aged ≥12 years.† All staff members (1,955) and campers (5,218) received site-specific, protocol-defined screening t...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, public health officials have focused their response into four main areas: 1) rapid and accurate testing: 2) contact tracing systems to monitor outbreaks; 3) prevention methods, such as vaccines and 4) effective treatments to aid recovery should a person become infected.For the last year and a half, biopharmaceutical companies have been working around the clock to help develop solutions, with emphasis on the latter two: the need for preventative vaccines and effective treatments.
Source: The Catalyst - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: Research and Development Vaccines Coronavirus Source Type: news
Comp Med. 2021 Oct 5. doi: 10.30802/AALAS-CM-21-000062. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe significant advances made by the global scientific community during the COVID-19 pandemic, exemplified by thedevelopment of multiple SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in less than 1 y, were made possible in part because of animal research.Historically, animals have been used to study the characterization, treatment, and prevention of most of the major infectious disease outbreaks that humans have faced. From the advent of modern 'germ theory' prior to the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic through the more recent Ebola and Zika virus outbreaks, research tha...
Source: Comparative Medicine - Category: Zoology Authors: Source Type: research
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