Vaxxers by Sarah Gilbert and Catherine Green; Until Proven Safe by Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley – reviews

The story of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is part manifesto for good science communications, part biomedical thriller, while a smart history of quarantines makes their utility resoundingly clearOn the first day of Wimbledon, Dame Sarah Gilbert, professor of vaccinology at Oxford ’s Jenner Institute, wastreated to a standing ovation from grateful spectators on a packed Centre Court. Together with her Oxford colleague Catherine Green, Gilbert had delivered the AstraZeneca vaccine against Covid-19in record time, and tennis fans, enjoying a rare maskless day out in SW19, were keen to show their appreciation. But as Gilbert and Green point out in their new book,Vaxxers, not everyone shares the Centre Court crowd ’s enthusiasm for vaccines, and as long as the coronavirus continues to mutate and conspiracy theories propagate on social media, their job is not over.It is remarkable that Gilbert, a 59-year-old mother of triplets, and Green, a specialist in vaccine manufacture, found time to write this book, given the considerable technical and logistical hurdles involved in developing a new vaccine from scratch in little under a year. The previous “lab-to-jab” record holder was the mumps vaccine, developed in four years in the 1960s. But because of the difficulty of raising funds for vaccine research and the various regulatory hurdles, it takes 10 years for most new vaccines to be licensed, and even then, a hurried press release or an err ant remark by a polit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science and nature books History books AstraZeneca Immunology Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Culture Source Type: news

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ore Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of the novel respiratory disease COVID-19, has reached pandemic status and presents a wide range of manifestations of diverse magnitude, including fever, cough, shortness of breath, and damage to vital organs, such as the heart, lung, kidney, and brain. Normally, older individuals and those with underlying health issues are more at risk. However, about 40% of COVID-19 positive individuals are asymptomatic. This review aims to identify suggested mechanisms of diverse manifestations of COVID-19. Studies suggest that T cell-mediated immunity and s...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In terms of ethiopathogenesis, the genitourinary tract is most often affected by viruses, in the context of viremia or through reactivation due to immunosuppression. Immunomodulation and vaccination prophylaxis play a leading role in therapy.PMID:34228144 | DOI:10.1007/s00120-021-01589-3
Source: Der Urologe. Ausg. A - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic could lead to health effects other than those directly attributable to the coronavirus itself. Renouncing care may result in healthcare delays highly deleterious for people and society. Public authorities are preoccupied with these questions; they have set up action plans aimed at encouraging patients to seek treatment without delay. That said, the COVID-19 pandemic crisis has also created opportunities, such as the expansion of telemedicine. Although partial, these indicators can provide useful information enabling public decision makers to be reactive and to implement specific actions to...
Source: Revue d Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Vaccine. 2021 Apr 27:S0264-410X(21)00460-6. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.04.023. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe Japanese immunization program has made considerable progress since 2009: several new vaccines have been introduced and most are included in the National Immunization Program (NIP). In October 2020, the Japanese law on immunization was revised, which resulted in a few laudable achievements. First, rotavirus vaccines were added to the NIP, 10 years after their introduction, and noteworthy studies of vaccine effectiveness and the incidence of intussusception in Japanese children were published. Second, rules on va...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion:Emergency physicians should be aware of the occurrence of vaccine-induced ITP in patients who present with bleeding manifestations, especially after the current boost in COVID-19 vaccination drive worldwide.
Source: Irish Journal of Medical Science - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Last March, friends and neighbors began stopping Emily Smith in her town outside of Waco, Texas, with questions about the coronavirus. An epidemiologist at Baylor University, Smith knows all too well how viruses are transmitted. But as the wife of a pastor and as a woman of faith, she also holds a trusted position in her community, and she would speak to those who asked about why she personally thought social distancing was a moral choice. As the weeks wore on, the questions kept coming: “What does flatten the curve mean?” “Is it safe for my child to kick a soccer ball outside with a friend?” So she...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Misinformation & Disinformation Source Type: news
o In the race for a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the synthetic mRNA format has been shown to be the fastest one and proved to be safe and highly efficient, even at the very low dose of a few µg per injection. The mRNA vaccines are not new: vaccines that are based on attenuated mRNA viruses, such as Mumps, Measles, and Rubella, immunize by delivering their mRNAs into the cells of the vaccinated individual, who produces the viral proteins that then prime the immune response. Synthetic mRNA in liposomes can be seen as a modern, more refined, and thereby a safer version of those live attenuated RNA viruses. The anti-C...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
This report summarizes data collected by state and local immunization programs* on vaccination coverage among children in kindergarten (kindergartners) in 48 states, exemptions for kindergartners in 49 states, and provisional enrollment and grace period status for kindergartners in 28 states for the 2019-20 school year, which was more than halfway completed when most schools moved to virtual learning in the spring because of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Nationally, vaccination coverage† was 94.9% for the state-required number of doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine (D...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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