130 Countries Promise to Protect and Invest in Health Care Workers

Members of a Community Health Nursing Team in Roseau, Dominica According to the World Health Organisation at least 115,000 health and care workers globally may have lost their lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. Credit: Alison Kentish/IPSBy Alison KentishUNITED NATIONS, Jun 23 2021 (IPS) One hundred and thirty countries have signed a statement recognising the efforts of health care workers, first responders and essential workers during the COVID-19 pandemic – “one of the greatest global challenges in the history of the United Nations”. The statement affirms their support for the World Health Organisation’s declaration of 2021 as the International Year of Health and Care Workers. On Tuesday, the nations launched their statement before the UN General Assembly. “Our appreciation for health and care workers cannot begin and end with the pandemic,” said Volkan Bozkir, President of the 75th Session of the UN General Assembly. “Each and every day, millions of nurses, midwives, doctors, researchers, emergency medical technicians and more, provide us with the support needed to live healthier lives. Whether in prevention or treatment, the entirety of our healthcare system is built upon the shoulders of the women and men who work tirelessly to provide us with relief in our times of need,” he said. The joint statement was proposed by the permanent missions of Brazil, Georgia, Japan, the Republic of South Africa, Thailand and Turkey. “...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations first responders health care workers Source Type: news

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IJERPH, Vol. 18, Pages 9218: School Teachers’ Self-Reported Fear and Risk Perception during the COVID-19 Pandemic—A Nationwide Survey in Germany International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph18179218 Authors: Stefanie Weinert Anja Thronicke Maximilian Hinse Friedemann Schad Harald Matthes With the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases peaking and health systems reaching their limits in winter 2020/21, schools remained closed in many countries. To better understand teachers’ risk perception, we conducted a survey in Germany. Participants were recru...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Dominican Farmer and Vendor Ayma Louis has COVID restrictions and the hurrricane season to contend with. Credit: Alison Kentish (IPS)By Alison KentishDOMINICA, Aug 31 2021 (IPS) Around 2:00 pm on August 18, 89-year-old farmer Whitnel Louis and his wife Ayma began packing up their unsold produce, hoping to leave the capital of Roseau and get home way ahead of the 6 pm curfew recently put in place to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Their pickup was among dozens that lined the Dame Mary Eugenia Charles Boulevard, known by locals simply as ‘the Bayfront,’ a wide street near the ocean with a cruise ship bert...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Climate Change COVID-19 Development & Aid Environment Featured Headlines Health Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations COVID-19 vaccines Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that social restrictions had a more substantial negative impact amongst younger adults compared to older adults, particularly in terms of mental health and well-being.CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Older adults may be more resilient to the impacts of the pandemic than younger cohorts and thus may serve as a critical resource for how to navigate crisis situations of this nature. Future studies should continue to monitor health outcomes as the pandemic subsides in conjunction with the vaccine rollout, as the long-term effects of social distancing and stay-at-home measures are yet to be determined.PMID:...
Source: Clinical Gerontologist - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: research
IJERPH, Vol. 18, Pages 9210: To Vaccinate or Not to Vaccinate—This Is the Question among Swiss University Students International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph18179210 Authors: Dratva Wagner Zysset Volken The speed and innovation of the COVID-19 vaccine development has been accompanied by insecurity and skepticism. Young adults’ attitude to vaccination remains under investigation, although herd immunity cannot be reached without them. The HEalth in Students during the Corona pandemic study (HES-C) provided the opportunity to investigate vaccination inte...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
By Emma Young Conspiracy theories stoke anxiety and uncertainty and can even threaten the health of those who espouse them. Take Covid-19 anti-vaxxers, for example, who put themselves at risk by refusing a vaccine. So given those negative consequences, it’s surprising that conspiracy theories are so prolific. Research shows that beliefs that other groups are colluding secretly to pursue malevolent goals (the definition of a conspiracy theory) are more common during times of crisis — like a global pandemic. Heightened anxiety is thought to lead people to (erroneously) believe that there are hostile fo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Cognition Media Source Type: blogs
By EMILY EVANS Emily Evans is the health policy guru at equity research company HedgeEye. She sends out these reports in emails to her clients regularly but (since I asked nicely) she allowed me to publish this one from late last week on THCB. You can catch Emily in person on the “How Much Are These Companies Really Worth? The IPO &SPAC Panel” at Policies|Techies|VCs–What’s Next for Health Care, the conference Jess Damassa &I are chairing on September 7-8-9-10 — Matthew Holt Politics. President Biden is going to have more important things to do this week than worry abou...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy COVID-19 Emily Evans Hedgeye masks Mental Health Source Type: blogs
e Jackson COVID-19 is a global pandemic that has resulted in widespread negative outcomes. Face masks and social distancing have been used to minimize its spread. Understanding who will engage in protective behaviors is crucial for continued response to the pandemic. We aimed to evaluate factors that are indicative of mask use and social distancing among current and former college students prior to vaccine access. Participants (N = 490; 67% female; 60% White) were current and former U.S. undergraduate college students. Perceived effectiveness and descriptive norms regarding COVID-19 safety measures, COVID-19-relate...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Together, these strategies can promote social connectedness and help reduce anxiety, stress, and depression, which may help psychologists, policymakers, and the global community remain resilience in places where cases are still high while promoting adjustment and growth in communities that are now recovering and looking to the future.PMID:34369221 | DOI:10.1080/10615806.2021.1950695
Source: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
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