Melons Are Being Recalled Over Salmonella Fears in More Than 20 States
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers in more than 20 states not to eat certain fruit salad mixes that contain pre-cut melons due to a salmonella outbreak. The pre-cut melon products are being recalled by Caito Foods, LLC. from grocery stores across 23 states. The salmonella outbreak has affected 60 people, primarily from the Midwest. Thirty-one people have been hospitalized, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The FDA advises avoiding fresh cut watermelon, honeydew, cantaloupe and any packaged product containing those melons for those located in Alabama, California, Florida, G...
Source: TIME: Health - June 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime Recalls Source Type: news

The Hot Dog You Shouldn't Have
FRIDAY, June 15, 2018 -- The scorching heat of summer poses dangers to people, but dogs also need protection from soaring temperatures, one veterinarian warns. Benjamin Brainard, director of clinical research at the University of Georgia's College... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Sullivan selected for two national scientific honors
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Dr. Jennifer C. Sullivan, pharmacologist and physiologist in the Department of Physiology at the Medical College of Georgia, has been honored by the American Journal of Hypertension and the American Heart Association's Council on Hypertension. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UGA and UConn Health researchers discover roles and teamwork of CRISPR-Cas proteins
(University of Georgia) Recently published research from the University of Georgia and UConn Health provides new insight about the basic biological mechanisms of the RNA-based viral immune system known as CRISPR-Cas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Report: Children ’s Healthcare of Atlanta takes 'first step' for $1.5B North Druid Hills campus
Children ’s Healthcare of Atlanta filed a letter of intent to apply for a state permit, the "first step" toward what would be the most expensive hospital construction plan in the history of the Georgia certificate-of-need (CON) program, according to Georgia Health News. The pediatric care organization's n ew hospital would be in a campus at I-85 and North Druid Hills Road in Brookhaven. The total cost listed on the CON application is $1.5 billion and includes the hospital, the attached clinic and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Eric Mandel Source Type: news

Report: Children ’s Healthcare of Atlanta takes 'first step' for $1.5B North Druid Hills campus
Children ’s Healthcare of Atlanta filed a letter of intent to apply for a state permit, the "first step" toward what would be the most expensive hospital construction plan in the history of the Georgia certificate-of-need (CON) program, according to Georgia Health News. The pediatric care organization's n ew hospital would be in a campus at I-85 and North Druid Hills Road in Brookhaven. The total cost listed on the CON application is $1.5 billion and includes the hospital, the attached clinic and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Eric Mandel Source Type: news

Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhouses
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) When trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Making the oxygen we breathe, a photosynthesis mechanism exposed
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Oxygen photosynthesis has to be the greatest giver of life on Earth, and researchers have cracked yet another part of its complex and efficient chemistry. The more we know about it, the better we may be able to tweak photosynthesis, should it come under environmental duress, or should we need to boost crop productivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Individual and Group-Based Engagement in an Online Physical Activity Monitoring Program in Georgia
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - June 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

ARS scientists are working to ensure safe waterways in Georgia
(American Society for Microbiology) Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are developing ways to identify the sources of any potentially harmful bacteria found in the surface waters around Athens, Georgia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctor Who Danced During Surgery Is Suspended by Georgia Medical Board
The board said that the dermatologist ’ s continued practice “ poses a threat to the public health, safety, and welfare. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CHRISTINA CARON Tags: Malpractice Surgery and Surgeons Plastic Surgery Suits and Litigation (Civil) Windell Davis Boutte Susan Witt Latoyah Rideau Icilma Cornelius Source Type: news

Scientists work to dissolve the NETs that worsen TBI damage
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Immune cells that are first responders to a traumatic brain injury appear to also contribute to the secondary damage that can occur even days later, scientists say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UAB and CDC app could assist treatment, diagnosis of hematologic disorders
A new app designed by a multidisciplinary team that includes a professor at UAB could make strides in improving the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic disorders, including blood clots.   The mobile app, called Anticoagulation Manager, is free and designed by Marisa Marques, a professor in the Department of Pathology in the Division of Lab Medicine, along with researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and the Georgia Institute of Technology and others. The app aims to guide the user in lab… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

UAB and CDC app could assist treatment, diagnosis of hematologic disorders
A new app designed by a multidisciplinary team that includes a professor at UAB could make strides in improving the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic disorders, including blood clots.   The mobile app, called Anticoagulation Manager, is free and designed by Marisa Marques, a professor in the Department of Pathology in the Division of Lab Medicine, along with researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and the Georgia Institute of Technology and others. The app aims to guide the user in lab… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

9 Kinds of Bug Bites You Might Get This Summer — and What to Do About Them
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Gardner / Health Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

I saw that. Brain mechanisms create confidence about things seen
(Georgia Institute of Technology) At the threshold of what we call consciousness is a brain function that makes you feel confidently aware that you are actually seeing what you see. Psychologists at Georgia Tech have observed mechanisms involved in making it work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biomaterial particles educate immune system to accept transplanted islets
(Georgia Institute of Technology) By instructing key immune system cells to accept transplanted insulin-producing islets, researchers have opened a potentially new pathway for treating type 1 diabetes. If the approach is ultimately successful in humans, it could allow type 1 diabetes to be treated without the long-term complications of immune system suppression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An examination of school climate, victimization, and mental health problems among middle school students self-identifying with emotional and behavioral disorders - Salle TL, George HP, McCoach DB, Polk T, Evanovich LL.
The purpose of the current study was to examine perceptions of school climate among students who self-identify as having an emotional and behavioral disorder (EBD) and their counterparts without disabilities on the Georgia Student Health Survey 2.0. Althou... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Couple loses custody of son after giving him marijuana for seizures
A Georgia couple, who says they gave their son marijuana to treat his seizures, is fighting to regain custody of him. The state took custody of Matthew and Suzeanna Brill's 15-year-old son, David, in April when he tested positive for marijuana. They are charged with reckless conduct. Omar Villafranca reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Arthur edits survival guide for anesthesiology residents
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Dr. Mary Arthur, director of the anesthesiology residency program at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, is the editor of Anesthesiology CA-1 Pocket Survival Guide, a new book designed to help new anesthesiology residents better navigate the transition from their intern year to the first clinical training year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Switching a single protein 'on' and 'off' controls our ability to learn and adapt
Scientists at Bradford University and Georgia State University have discovered that the way one protein turns on and off is key to the brain's ability to adapt in learning, a key problem in dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Georgia Surgeon Twerks in the OR (And Then Things Get Real)
(MedPage Today) -- The reaction is not good (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - May 31, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammation
Women are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists from Turku Center for Biotechnology and University of Georgia reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 31, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammation
(University of Turku) Women are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists from Turku Center for Biotechnology and University of Georgia reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists seek to better protect the eye from glaucoma
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Under the increased pressure of glaucoma, scientists want to help the neurons in our eyes better protect themselves and get better help from their friends.They are working to see whether agents that activate the innate neuron protector sigma 1 receptor, or S1R, can do both. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In child-crippling mucolipidosis IV, drug shows hope in lab cultures
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Medicine offers no treatment for children crippled by mucolipidosis IV, which hits them in the first year of life and gradually becomes fatal. But researchers battling it with limited means at their disposal have captured a glimmer of hope in lab tests on an existing drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lawsuits allege dancing doctor was negligent
At least seven lawsuits have been filed against a surgeon in Georgia who shared videos of herself dancing on YouTube during surgery while patients are in view and under anesthesia. The suits claim she is unqualified and her behavior resulted in poor outcomes including brain damage. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shining a light on toxic chemicals curbs industrial use
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology wondered whether federal regulators can persuade companies to abandon toxic chemicals by simply highlighting that information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Helping Others Heal: Hollis has late-stage cancer, but it does not define her
Hollis Youngner, 37, has late-stage cancer, but it does not define her. Her greatest inspiration is her daughter, Hayes, but Hollis has become an inspiration for thousands. _________________________________________________________________ The life and loves of Hollis Youngner, 37, pulse throughout her home in St. Simons Island, Georgia, on a sunlit summer morning. On the dining room table, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 23, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

2019 Georgia Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Conference
May 7-9, 2019; Atlanta, GA. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How bacteria behave differently in humans compared to the lab
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Most of what we know today about deadly bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained from studies done in laboratory settings. Research reported May 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that this laboratory-based information may have important limits for predicting how these bugs behave once they've invaded humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Engineering training helps Georgia Tech researcher treat movement disorders
Lena Ting explores the unanswered questions in her quest to use engineering principals to understand how people move. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 18, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Tonya Layman Source Type: news

UCF clinic receives $10 million to expand PTSD treatment and research program to military installations
University of Central Florida's cutting-edge clinic that helps people who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder was awarded a $10 million grant to establish programs at three military installations in the Southeastern U.S. The U.S Army funded UCF’s Restores clinic to expand its program that combines virtual-reality and exposure therapy with group treatments to Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Georgia, Naval Medical Hospital Portsmouth in Virginia and Marine Corps Base Camp… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anjali Fluker Source Type: news

UCF clinic receives $10 million to expand PTSD treatment and research program to military installations
University of Central Florida's cutting-edge clinic that helps people who are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder was awarded a $10 million grant to establish programs at three military installations in the Southeastern U.S. The U.S Army funded UCF’s Restores clinic to expand its program that combines virtual-reality and exposure therapy with group treatments to Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Georgia, Naval Medical Hospital Portsmouth in Virginia and Marine Corps Base Camp… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 17, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anjali Fluker Source Type: news

An Audiologist Explains Why You Hear ‘Yanny’ or ‘Laurel’ — Or Both
An audiologist has an explanation for why everyone on the internet can’t stop asking: “Yanny” or “Laurel”? “This all comes down to the brain,” says Dr. Kevin Franck, director of audiology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. “The fact that brains go in one way and some brains go in the other means that we’re all just wired a bit differently based on our experiences.” The viral audio clip — which some listeners interpret as a deep male voice saying, “Yanny,” and others hear as a higher-pitched voiced saying, “Laurel” — popped up on Redd...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime sound Source Type: news

Letting the cat out of the bag: Why researchers disclose results ahead of publication
(Georgia Institute of Technology) A new study from a research team from the Georgia Institute of Technology found that a majority of scientists disclose key details about their work informally to peers and potential collaborators ahead of publishing in a peer reviewed journal or presenting the findings publicly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Georgia student had to relearn everything after mystery brain injury
Clark Jacobs, nicknamed 'Superman,' narrowly survived a traumatic brain injury when he fell from his lofted bed at Georgia Tech in 2015. Now, the 23-year-old has relearned everything in two years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Student, 23, who suffered a mysterious brain injury and had to to relearn everything
Clark Jacobs, nicknamed 'Superman,' narrowly survived a traumatic brain injury when he fell from his lofted bed at Georgia Tech in 2015. Now, the 23-year-old has relearned everything in two years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Georgia sees heavy 'in-migration' from Florida, New York (Slideshow)
Georgia is a destination state for in-migration. The Peach State saw the fifth-largest increase of migration among the 50 states, with 69,106 additions, according to year-over-year U.S Census data as of year-end 2016 (latest available). The biggest influx came from Florida, followed by New York, Tennessee, Texas and California. See the adjacent slideshow for Georgia migration from each state. The four states with a bigger net change were Florida (+188,197), Texas (+95,345), Arizona (82,176) and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Eric Mandel Source Type: news

Protective protein activated by vitamin K found, inactive, abundant in blacks on dialysis
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) High levels of a protein activated by vitamin K and associated with cardiovascular disease when it isn't, has been found in the blood of African-Americans on dialysis, investigators report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCB Announces Briviact (brivaracetam) Now Approved by FDA to Treat Partial-Onset (Focal) Seizures in Pediatric Epilepsy Patients
Atlanta, Georgia (U.S.)& Brussels (Belgium), 0700 CEST, 14 May, 2018: UCB announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for the company ’s newest anti-epileptic drug... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - May 14, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Two family physicians reflect on white privilege in health care and the need for action
(American Academy of Family Physicians) 'Our medical system is structured to individually and systemically favor white physicians and patients in ways that white people are trained to ignore,' states family medicine resident Max Romano, M.D., M.P.H. In a related editorial, Joseph Hobbs, M.D., chair of family medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, cautions against allowing concepts such as white privilege, unconscious and implicit bias, and institutional racism to provide a means for avoiding personal responsibility for racism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Massive Eradication Effort Ends Rodents' Reign Of Terror On Forbidding Isle
Since humans came to South Georgia Island centuries ago, rats have terrorized rare native birds. But an ambitious project, using some plucky canine aides, has cleared the frigid wilderness.(Image credit: Oliver Prince/Courtesy of South Georgia Heritage Trust) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

Getting less than six hours sleep raises people's risk of depression
Researchers from Georgia Southern University found that getting less than the recommended seven hours a night is also linked to feelings of nervousness, helplessness and restlessness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Getting less than six hours sleep raises people's risk of depression by up to 80%, study finds
Researchers from Georgia Southern University found that getting less than the recommended seven hours a night is also linked to feelings of nervousness, helplessness and restlessness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is BD Running a Monopoly on the Safety Syringe Market?
A group of healthcare providers is calling foul on BD, accusing the company of abusing its "extraordinary market power to require the use of oppressive, anti-competitive contracts that effectively force above-competitive prices on the market." The group filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for Southern Illinois against BD (Becton Dickinson), its distributors, and group purchasing organizations (GPOs). Premier Inc., Vizient, Cardinal Health, Owens & Minor, and Henry Schein are among the named defendants. According to the lawsuit, BD has monopolized the U.S. safety syringe market. The wording of the ...
Source: MDDI - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

New pulmonary hypertension treatment target in the bull's-eye
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A new and early target for treating pulmonary hypertension appears to be an enzyme that's normally key to energy production but destructive in the face of this high blood pressure inside your lungs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Migratory animals carry more parasites, says study
(University of Georgia) Every year, billions of animals migrate across the globe, carrying parasites with them and encountering parasites through their travels. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Georgia's Odum School of Ecology discovered that animals known to migrate long distances are infected by a greater number of parasite species than animals that do not migrate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteins
Cancer drops sparse chemical hints of its presence early on, but unfortunately, many of them are in a class of biochemicals that could not be detected thoroughly, until now. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have engineered a chemical trap that exhaustively catches what are called glycoproteins, including minuscule traces that have previously escaped detection. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Chemical octopus catches sneaky cancer clues, trace glycoproteins
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Certain minuscule cancer signals easily evade detection, but perhaps no longer. Biomarkers made of glycoproteins are bound to get snared in the tentacles of this chemical octopus that Georgia Tech chemists devised over several years. The monstrous molecule could also be a windfall for the rising field of glycoscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news