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NuVasive acquires startup with Duke University roots
Vertera Spine, a startup with research origins at Duke University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, has been acquired by San Diego-based medical device company NuVasive (Nasdaq: NUVA), which reported revenues of more than $960 million last year. Ken Gall, chair of Duke’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, co-founded Vertera in 2013 while working as a professor at Georgia Tech. “NuVasive will use this to really dominate the market,” he says. “What we liked… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

A Hospital Crisis Is Killing Rural Communities. This State Is'Ground Zero. '
Inside three Georgia counties that have struggled to keep their hospitals ― and futures  ― alive. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Black Man Convicted By a Racist Juror Is About to Be Executed
It seems pretty clear that an African American isn’t going to get a fair trial from a juror who calls him a “nigger.” And yet that’s what happened in the case of Keith Tharpe, who Georgia will execute on September 26 for the murder of his sister-in-law, unless the Supreme Court decides otherwise. The fate of Keith Tharpe was entrusted into the hands of a juror who was unconvinced he, as a black person, had a soul. This seems to fall short of the “impartial jury” guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution. In 1998, lawyers seeking to appeal Tharpe’s 1991 conviction inter...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shane Claiborne Tags: Uncategorized justice Race Source Type: news

Georgia Medicaid could get short-term boost from ACA replacement
Georgia and other states that did not expand Medicaid coverage through Obamacare would receive an increase in federal health-care funding under a replacement to the Affordable Care Act the U.S. Senate is expected to take up next week. However, a per-enrollee cap on Medicaid funding included in the bill would offset at least some of those gains. Those are the findings of an analysis released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a non-partisan nonprofit that focuses on health policy. The legislation,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 21, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dave Williams Source Type: news

5 Lottery Winners Who Got in Trouble With the Law
One of New Jersey’s richest Powerball winners was charged Wednesday with sexually assaulting a child, prosecutors said, landing him on a growing list of lottery winners who have either befallen misfortune or been accused of a crime. Pedro Quezada, 49, won $338 million — one of the state’s biggest Powerball jackpots in history — in 2013. He was arrested Wednesday and charged with sexually assaulting a young girl for about three years when the child was between 11 and 14 years old, Passaic County Prosecutor Camelia Valdes said in a statement. The alleged crimes took place before Quezada won the lotter...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized Crime Lottery onetime Source Type: news

Divided Democratic Party Debates Its Future as 2020 Looms
Like virtually all Democrats, Tim Ryan is no fan of Donald Trump. But as he speeds through his northeastern Ohio district in a silver Chevy Suburban, the eight-term Congressman sounds almost as frustrated with his own party. Popping fistfuls of almonds in the backseat, Ryan gripes about its fixation on divisive issues and its “demonization” of business owners. Ryan, 44, was briefly considered for the role of Hillary Clinton’s running mate last year. Now he sounds ready to brawl with his political kin. “We’re going to have a fight,” Ryan says. “There’s no question about it.&rd...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Philip Elliott / Youngstown, Ohio Tags: Uncategorized democratic party Source Type: news

Piedmont Newnan Hospital requests to add 18 more beds
Piedmont Healthcare is looking to grow its Newnan, Ga., hospital by adding 18 more patient beds. The project would cost $8.2 million dollars. According to a letter submitted to the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH), the project will require the renovation of 11,500 square feet on the fifth floor of the hospital to create a new unit. Currently, the fifth floor space is occupied by hospital administration, physician offices and clinical support space. Physician and clinical support will… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

Will Small Companies See a Bigger Impact from Hurricanes?
Cardiovascular Systems Inc. said Monday that its procedure volumes took a hit in the Houston, TX, and Florida markets, which account for more than 15% of the company’s revenue, in the aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. To add insult to injury, the company reported that September is normally its strongest month for procedures within the quarter, which means the fiscal first quarter revenues are more heavily weighted in September.  The company is based in St. Paul, MN, but has a facility in Pearland, TX, near Houston. "As recovery progresses, we will closely monitor conditions and the anticipated i...
Source: MDDI - September 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Running roaches, flapping moths create a new physics of organisms
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Sand-swimming lizards, slithering robotic snakes, dusk-flying moths and running roaches all have one thing in common: They're increasingly being studied by physicists interested in understanding the shared strategies these creatures have developed to overcome the challenges of moving though their environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Georgia Tech Urges People to Stay Indoors Because of Violent Protests on Campus
Georgia Tech officials are urging students to stay indoors because of violent protests on campus a day after the death of a student who authorities say was advancing on officers with a knife. The university issued the emergency alert Monday night, shortly after a vigil was held to honor the life of 21-year-old Scout Schultz. Authorities did not immediately release details about the protests. Police shot and killed Schultz late Saturday night. Investigators have said Schultz refused to put down a knife and kept moving toward officers. Georgia Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Nelly Miles says three suicide notes were fou...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized georgia onetime Source Type: news

Three Arrested During Protests at Georgia Tech After Vigil For Slain Student
(ATLANTA) — Three people were arrested Monday night during a protest after a vigil for a Georgia Tech student who was fatally shot by campus police, a university spokesman said. Police shot and killed Scout Schultz late Saturday night after the 21-year-old student called 911 to report an armed and possibly intoxicated suspicious person, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation has said. Georgia Tech sent out alerts urging students to shelter indoors Monday night and lock doors and windows because of violent protests. Video posted on social media showed a police vehicle burning in the street and officers pinning people to ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Brumback / AP Tags: Uncategorized georgia onetime Source Type: news

The 10 Most Hated Airports in the U.S.
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Benjamin Zhang / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Police Fatally Shoot Georgia Tech Student They Say Was Armed With a Knife
Police on Saturday shot and killed a 21-year-old Georgia Tech student who they say was armed with a knife and ignored multiple commands to drop the weapon. Scout Schultz, a fourth-year computer engineering major and a campus leader, approached Georgia Tech Police Department officers with a knife outside a campus dormitory, law enforcement and school officials said. The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, which is investigating the incident, said an officer shot Schultz after Schultz refused to stop walking toward the officers or put down the knife. Schultz died early Sunday in a hospital. No officers were injured during the i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized georgia onetime Source Type: news

Researchers Look To Improve Weather Forecasting After Irma
In coastal Georgia, Hurricane Irma caused far more flooding than expected. Researchers are looking at ways their mistakes there could improve future predictions elsewhere. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Jones Source Type: news

An Exhaustive List of All the References We Could Find in Mother!
Warning: spoilers for the movie mother! follow. Eliza: So the movie mother! was…something else. Eliana: I am shook. Eliza: I am…confused? Infuriated? Discombobulated? Eliana: I’m coping by Googling as many references as possible: there’s the Genesis story, and I kept thinking about The Giving Tree, which is already depressing for a kids’ book. But this movie takes things to a whole new, bloody level. Eliza: Yeah, and it was nearly impossible to avoid chatter in the ether that the whole thing is a warning about our present path to destroying the environment. Eliana: Yes, the director, Darren...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman and Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized Jennifer Lawrence movies Source Type: news

President Trump Says He Won ’t Allow ‘Chain Migration.’ What’s That?
As President Donald Trump wrestles over the details of a DACA deal with Democrats, he gave an assurance to conservatives Friday morning. “CHAIN MIGRATION cannot be allowed to be part of any legislation on Immigration!” the President tweeted. CHAIN MIGRATION cannot be allowed to be part of any legislation on Immigration! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 15, 2017 Chain migration is the process by which one immigrant is admitted to the country, then he or she sponsors relatives back home to come to the U.S., who in turn could sponsor more relatives. In other words, under current U.S. immig...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tessa Berenson Tags: Uncategorized Congress Immigration onetime White House Source Type: news

Schools Seek to Help Immigrants Amid Mixed Signals on DACA
(BERKELEY, Calif.) — Mixed signals from Washington over a possible agreement to preserve protections for young immigrants are increasing anxiety and confusion on college campuses, where the stakes are high. Amid the uncertainty, colleges and universities are stepping up efforts to protect students enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, telling them to be hopeful but plan for the worst. Harvard University has opened a round-the-clock emergency hotline for immigrants in the program. The University of Illinois at Chicago has posted advice on what to do if federal agents show up on campus. UC Ber...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jocelyn Gecker and Sophia Tareen / AP Tags: Uncategorized DACA Immigration onetime Source Type: news

Nursing homes of the past are no longer an acceptable option
Atlanta is the fastest aging city in the country which means that there is an increasing demand in our community for services and resources focused on the health and well-being of older adults. This is especially true for the growing number of people who are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, a number expected to reach nearly 200,000 in Georgia by 2025. As the CEO of the city’s longest operating nursing home provider and one of Atlanta’s oldest nonprof it organizations,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Albert K. Blackwelder Source Type: news

Nursing homes of the past are no longer an acceptable option
Atlanta is the fastest aging city in the country which means that there is an increasing demand in our community for services and resources focused on the health and well-being of older adults. This is especially true for the growing number of people who are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, a number expected to reach nearly 200,000 in Georgia by 2025. As the CEO of the city’s longest operating nursing home provider and one of Atlanta’s oldest nonprof it organizations,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Albert K. Blackwelder Source Type: news

Steroid hormones could hold further clues about age-related bone loss
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Previous research has shown that the protein histone deacetylase 3, or HDAC3, turns off the genes that encourage the stem cells in our bone marrow to make and store fat instead of making bone. As HDAC3 levels decrease naturally with age, bones become less dense and easily breakable. Now scientists looking further upstream to hopefully explain the mechanism behind that process are finding some conflicting results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Approves New indication for Briviact (brivaracetam) as Monotherapy Treatment of Partial-Onset Seizures in Adults
Atlanta, Georgia (U.S.)& Brussels (Belgium), 15 September, 2017 – 0700 (CEST): UCB announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for Briviact (brivaracetam) CV as... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - September 15, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

The Football Brothers in Last Chance U Have Been Charged In Relation to a Fatal Stabbing
Two Tennessee brothers featured in the Netflix series Last Chance U are facing charges linked to an 18-year-old’s fatal stabbing earlier this year. Isaiah Wright, 20, and Camion Patrick, 22, are being charged along with two others in relation to the July 25 stabbing death of Caleb Radford in Louisville, Tenn., reports the Washington Post. Police did not specify how each of the defendants were involved in the case. The Post reports that Wright and Patrick first caught wider attention when their involvement in the East Tennessee Community College football team was featured in the second season of Last Chance U. Accordi...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kevin Lui Tags: Uncategorized Crime onetime Tennessee Source Type: news

The Incredible Story Behind a Haunting Picture of a POW in Vietnam
The man in the picture keeps his eyes to the ground. Though there are no walls keeping him in — the image was taken in a rice field — there’s no mistaking that he is a prisoner. The rope that binds his arms is only just visible, but the militiawoman guarding him with her bayonet is plain to see. And yet, 50 years after that striking photograph was taken, he remembers that the event it captures held for him a secret sense of possibility. That day was a breath of relief, and cause for a silent prayer of gratitude. The man’s name is Dewey Wayne Waddell. Today, at 82, he’s retired and living in M...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized conflict Military photography POW Vietnam Source Type: news

Inside the White House Hurricane Response
At precisely 12:30 on Sept. 12, more than 60 federal, state and local emergency response officials from around the country convened on a video teleconference to address the catastrophic effects of hurricanes Harvey and Irma. The White House dialed in from a secure, windowless office across from the West Wing, its 24/7 use over the last weeks indicated by the coat rack of suits and the pillow and blanket stacked beside the sofa. The National Weather Service, the Pentagon and U.S. Northern Command linked in via their own video feeds. Front line responders from the Gulf Coast to the mid-Atlantic tuned in to provide updates fr...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zeke J Miller Tags: Uncategorized Bossert FEMA Florida harvey Hurricanes irma Pentagon Puerto Rico trump White House Source Type: news

8 Die at Florida Nursing Home in Irma's Sweltering Aftermath
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Eight patients at a sweltering nursing home died after Hurricane Irma knocked out the air conditioning, raising fears Wednesday about the safety of Florida's 4 million senior citizens amid power outages that could go on for days. Hollywood Police Chief Tom Sanchez said investigators believe the deaths at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills were heat-related, and added: "The building has been sealed off and we are conducting a criminal investigation." Gov. Rick Scott called on Florida emergency workers to immediately check on nursing homes to make sure patients are safe, and h...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tim Reynolds and Terry Spencer, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Georgian-era STI data shows rural-urban divide in Cheshire
Chester residents had higher syphilis rate than rural neighbours, says study of 18th Century infections. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deaths from Carbon Monoxide, Power Outages Reported After Irma
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Florida residents struggling to put their lives back together in Hurricane Irma's wake fell victim to new hazards, including oppressive heat, brush-clearing accidents, house fires and deadly fumes from generators. Five residents of a Hollywood nursing home that lost power in the storm died, authorities said Wednesday. They gave no immediate details on the cause. Police and fire crews began evacuating Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the deaths there. In the Miami area, a Coral Gables apartment building was evacuated after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe for e...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Terry Spencer and Jason Dearen, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

Deaths from Carbon Monoxide, Power Outages Reported After Irma
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. (AP) — Florida residents struggling to put their lives back together in Hurricane Irma's wake fell victim to new hazards, including oppressive heat, brush-clearing accidents, house fires and deadly fumes from generators. Five residents of a Hollywood nursing home that lost power in the storm died, authorities said Wednesday. They gave no immediate details on the cause. Police and fire crews began evacuating Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the deaths there. In the Miami area, a Coral Gables apartment building was evacuated after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe for e...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Terry Spencer and Jason Dearen, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

5 People Die in Florida Nursing Home That Lost Power During Irma
(HOLLYWOOD, Fla.) — Florida residents struggling to put their lives back together in Hurricane Irma’s wake fell victim to new hazards, including oppressive heat, brush-clearing accidents, house fires and deadly fumes from generators. Five residents of a Hollywood nursing home that lost power in the storm died, authorities said Wednesday. They gave no immediate details on the cause. Police and fire crews began evacuating Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills after the deaths there. In the Miami area, a Coral Gables apartment building was evacuated after authorities determined a lack of power made it unsafe fo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

After son's "near death" accident, mom tries to change dorm policy
Georgia schools change policies after 20-year-old was injured falling from 7-foot-high loft bed (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As 'flesh-eating'   Leishmania come closer, a vaccine against them does, too
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Boils the size of sand dollars, facial damage reminiscent of acid wounds, death by maiming   of the liver and spleen. Leishmania parasites inflict suffering around the world that is the stuff of parables. They are the second-deadliest parasites after malaria, and global warming is slowly pushing them north toward the United States. Can a new experimental vaccine someday stop them? The vaccine has worked in humanized mice, as detailed in a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Terris receives Presidential Citation
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Dr. David Terris, a Regents' Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology at the Medical College of Georgia, is the recipient of a 2017 Presidential Citation from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.The awards recognize individuals who have left a personal imprint on the life and career of the academy's president and/or have made a lasting impression through their contributions and dedication to the academy. Terris will be recognized at the group's annual meeting this week in Chicago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Florida Death Toll from Hurricane Irma Rises to 12
State officials are raising the number of deaths in Florida from Hurricane Irma to 12 from the previous seven. That brings the total death toll in all areas affected by the storm to 55. McKinley Lewis is a spokesman for Florida Gov. Rick Scott. Lewis says six people died in car crashes, four while engaged in storm preparations, one was electrocuted by a downed power line, and another had a cardiac issue. Officials have reported 37 deaths in the Caribbean, four deaths in South Carolina, and two deaths in Georgia. Carbon monoxide expelled by generators has killed one man in South Carolina and sent two people to the hospital ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

FEMA: Hurricane Irma Destroyed One-Quarter of Homes in the Florida Keys
(KEY LARGO, Fla.) — Search-and-rescue teams made their way into the Florida Keys’ farthest reaches Tuesday, while crews labored to repair the single washed-out highway connecting the islands and rush aid to Hurricane Irma’s victims. Federal officials estimated one-quarter of all homes in the Keys were destroyed. Two days after Irma roared into the island chain with 130 mph winds, residents were allowed to return to the parts of the Keys closest to Florida’s mainland. But the full extent of the death and destruction there remained a question mark because communications and access were cut off in plac...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jason Dearen and Martha Mendoza / AP Tags: Uncategorized Florida natural disaster onetime Source Type: news

The 20 Happiest States in the U.S.
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lucy Yang / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized bi onetime onetimetravel States Source Type: news

9 People Dead After Shooting at Suburban Home
(PLANO, Texas) — Nine people, including a suspect who was fatally shot by an officer, have died after a man opened fire during a gathering to watch football at a suburban Dallas home, police said Monday. Plano police Chief Gregory W. Rushin said at a Monday afternoon news conference that one of two people hospitalized after the Sunday night shooting had died. An officer responding to a report of shots fired at about 8 p.m. confronted the suspected shooter and opened fire, killing the suspect. Police then found the nine gunshot victims — seven were dead and two were taken to the hospital. “The first respo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized APW Crime onetime Source Type: news

Israel Response Teams Help Evacuees in Atlanta and Savannah Before Heading to Florida  
Jerusalem - The Israel Rescue Coalition (IRC) and United Hatzalah (UH) Search and Rescue team that departed Israel on Saturday night landed in Atlanta early Sunday morning. The team stocked up on supplies to bring to battered Florida but was grounded due to severe tornado warnings that affected the area of Atlanta and southern Georgia all throughout Sunday. Not wanting to lose any precious time that could be spent helping Florida evacuees, the team headed to the Beth Jacob synagogue of Toco Hills where the congregation and synagogue itself were providing food and shelter for some 1,500 Irma evacuees. The Orthodox Syna...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Major Incidents News Operations Source Type: news

Israel Response Teams Help Evacuees in Atlanta and Savannah Before Heading to Florida  
Jerusalem - The Israel Rescue Coalition (IRC) and United Hatzalah (UH) Search and Rescue team that departed Israel on Saturday night landed in Atlanta early Sunday morning. The team stocked up on supplies to bring to battered Florida but was grounded due to severe tornado warnings that affected the area of Atlanta and southern Georgia all throughout Sunday. Not wanting to lose any precious time that could be spent helping Florida evacuees, the team headed to the Beth Jacob synagogue of Toco Hills where the congregation and synagogue itself were providing food and shelter for some 1,500 Irma evacuees. The Orthodox Syna...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Major Incidents News Operations Source Type: news

Residents Return Home to Some of the Hard-Hit Florida Keys
MIAMI (AP) — Residents were allowed to return Tuesday to some islands in the hurricane-slammed Florida Keys as officials tried to piece together the scope of Irma's destruction and rushed aid into the drenched and debris-strewn state. Two days after the storm roared into the Keys with 130 mph winds, the full extent of the destruction there was still a question mark because communications and access were cut off in many cases. But residents and business owners from Key Largo, Tavernier and Islamorada near the mainland were allowed back for their first look. The Lower Keys — including the chain's most distant an...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Freida Frisaro and Martha Mendoza, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Engineering Research Center will help expand use of therapies based on living cells
(Georgia Institute of Technology) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded nearly $20 million to a consortium of universities to support a new engineering research center (ERC) that will work closely with industry and clinical partners to develop transformative tools and technologies for the consistent, scalable and low-cost production of high-quality living therapeutic cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Millions of Florida Homes and Businesses Still Don ’t Have Power
Even as Irma continues to move inland as a weakened tropical storm, much of Florida’s power grid is still offline in its wake, leaving 6.2 million power company customers across the state without electricity. The figure represents almost 60% of the state’s electricity users, who were still experiencing power outage as of 9 p.m. EDT Monday, according to the state’s Division of Emergency Management. According to Florida Power & Light (FPL), over 3.2 million customers still had no electricity late Monday — that’s two-thirds of the 4.9 million customers the company serves. FPL says that 19,500...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kevin Lui Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

Disability Claimant Failed To Prove Reconsideration Is Warranted, Federal Judge Says
ATLANTA - A Georgia federal judge on Aug. 28 denied a disability claimant's motion to reconsider because the claimant failed to prove that there were any manifest errors of fact warranting reconsideration of the court's finding that the claimant is not entitled to benefits under a policy's lifetime sickness rider (William F. Nefsky v. Unum Life Insurance Company of America, No. 15-2119, N.D. Ga., 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 137596). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News - September 12, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

‘I Just Hope Everyone Survived.’ Search-and-Rescue Begins in Florida Keys
(MIAMI) — Authorities sent an aircraft carrier and other Navy ships to the Florida Keys to help with search-and-rescue operations Monday as a flyover of the hurricane-battered islands yielded what the governor said were scenes of devastation. “My heart goes out to the people in the Keys,” Gov. Rick Scott said. He added: “I just hope everyone survived.” He said boats were cast ashore, water, sewer and power were knocked out, and “I don’t think I saw one trailer park where almost everything wasn’t overturned.” The scale of the damage inflicted by Irma began to come into f...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Kay and Doug Ferguson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Florida onetime Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Irma Leaves 1 Person Dead in Georgia
(ATLANTA) — Irma killed one person in Georgia as storm surge and rain flooded coastal communities Monday, winds sent trees crashing onto homes and the world’s busiest airport in Atlanta canceled hundreds of flights as the storm’s punch was felt statewide despite its weakened status as a tropical storm. The city of Savannah, on Georgia’s coast, was evacuated for the second time in less than a year because of the storm, and the National Weather Service in Peachtree City confirmed that Atlanta — more than 250 miles (400 kilometers) inland from either the Atlantic or Gulf coasts — was under ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Landrum Jr. and Russ Bynum / AP Tags: Uncategorized georgia onetime Source Type: news

Irma Takes Aim At Georgia
More than 300,000 people in the state are already without power. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

How a Court Answered a Forgotten Question of Slavery ’s Legacy
In recent weeks, as Americans across the country have engaged in debates about how the Civil War period is publicly commemorated, a quieter battle over a related question was finally put to rest. On Aug. 30, 2017, Senior United States District Judge Thomas F. Hogan answered an old question for Cherokee Freedmen — the descendants of people who were enslaved by members of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma — who have been fighting for their tribal citizenship since the early 1980s. In the case of The Cherokee Nation V. Nash, et.al. Judge Hogan looked at whether an 1866 Treaty — which stated that people who had...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Arica L. Coleman Tags: Uncategorized Civil War Opinion slavery Source Type: news

‘Today Our Entire Nation Grieves With You.’ Read President Trump’s 9/11 Memorial Remarks
President Trump marked the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks Monday with a pledge of support for the families of those killed that day. “Today our entire nation grieves with you and with every family of those 2,977 innocent souls who were murdered by terrorists 16 years ago,” Trump said Monday while speaking at a memorial ceremony at the Pentagon, the site of one of the attacks. “Though we can never erase your pain, or bring back those you lost, we can honor their sacrifice by pledging our resolve to do whatever we must to keep our people safe.” Monday marked Trump’s first time sp...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized onetime september 11 Source Type: news

Where Is Hurricane Irma Going Next?
One-time Hurricane Irma was downgraded to a tropical storm Monday morning, though it’s still capable of producing dangerous winds, flooding, and storm surge. Forecasts warn that Irma has a “very large wind field,” with hurricane-force winds up to 60 miles away from the storm’s center. Irma is currently making its way up the Florida peninsula, according to the National Hurricane Center. Storm surge warnings are in effect along nearly all of Florida’s west coast, as well as along the northern part of its east coast and into Georgia and South Carolina. Tropical Storm Irma should hit Georgia on Mo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maya Rhodan Tags: Uncategorized Florida hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

Despite Losing Hurricane Status, Irma Continues to Wreak Havoc
TAMPA, Florida (AP) — Hurricane Irma weakened to a still-dangerous tropical storm Monday as it pushed inland, triggering record flooding in Florida's northeastern corner, while rescuers in its soggy, wind-battered wake mobilized to reach victims and learn the full extent of the damage. The storm wreaked havoc from the state's southernmost point to areas near the Georgia line, with homes and cars swamped, trees flattened, boats cast onto roads in the Florida Keys and streets underwater in many places. Irma also snapped miles upon miles of power lines and toppled three massive construction cranes over Miami and Fort La...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tamara Lush, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Massive But Weakened, Hurricane Irma Is Now a Category 1 Storm
(TAMPA, Florida) — A massive but weakened Hurricane Irma zeroed in on the Tampa Bay region early Monday after hammering much of Florida with roof-ripping winds, gushing floodwaters and widespread power outages. Irma continued its slog north along Florida’s western coast having blazed a path of unknown destruction. With communication cut to some of the Florida Keys, where Irma made landfall Sunday, and rough conditions persisting across the peninsula, many held their breath for what daylight might reveal. The monster storm measured more than 400 miles (640 kilometers) wide, and its winds of up to 130 mph (210 kp...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tamara Lush / AP Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma onetime weather Source Type: news