GSE147629 Development of an in vivo ligated loop model reveals new insight into the host immune response against  Campylobacter jejuni

Contributors : Nicholas M Negretti ; Yinyin Ye ; Lais M Malavasi ; Swechha M Pokharel ; Steven Huynh ; Susan Noh ; Christopher R Gourley ; Claude A Ragle ; Santanu Bose ; Torey Looft ; Craig T Parker ; Geremy Clair ; Joshua N Adkins ; Michael E KonkelSeries Type : Expression profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Campylobacter jejuniThe symptoms of infectious diarrheal disease are mediated by the interplay between the host and pathogen. Campylobacter jejuni is the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea worldwide due to its near-ubiquitous zoonotic association with poultry. One of the outstanding questions is what factors drive the intestinal inflammation during the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. Specifically, it is not known the extent to which the bacteria are responsible for the diarrheal symptoms via cell necrosis, or whether there is immune cell recruitment prior to tissue damage. To determine the stepwise process of inflammation that leads to diarrhea, we used a piglet ligated intestinal loop model to study the intestinal environment in response to C. jejuni. Pigs were chosen due to the anatomical similarity of the porcine intestine to the human intestine, as the basis of disease modeling is to understand the process of human disease. Using immunoassays and proteomic approaches, we found that neutrophils are most likely the predominant cell type recruited to the intestines of C. jejuni infected animals. In the lumen of the intestine, a number of neutr...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Expression profiling by high throughput sequencing Campylobacter jejuni Source Type: research

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The genus Campylobacter groups 32 Gram-negative bacteria species, several being zoonotic pathogens and a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Antibiotic resistant Campylobacter is considered by the World Health Organization as a high priority pathogen for research and development of new antibiotics. Genetic elements related to antibiotic resistance in the classical C. coli and C. jejuni species, which infect humans and livestock, have been analyzed in numerous studies, mainly focused on local geographical areas. However, the presence of these resistance determinants in other Campylobacter species, as well as in ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
u X Abstract Rapid and accurate identification of Arcobacter is of great importance because it has been considered as an emerging food- and water-borne pathogen and potential zoonotic agent. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate bacteria based on Raman scattering spectral patterns of whole cells in a fast, reagentless, and easy-to-use manner. We aimed to detect and discriminate Arcobacter at the species level using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (785 nm) coupled with neural networks. A total of 82 reference and field isolates of 18 Arcobacter species from clinical, environmental and agri-food sources were includ...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
In this study, floodwater samples (n=96) were collected as promptly post-hurricane as possible and for up to approx. 30 days, and selectively enriched for Campylobacter using Bolton broth enrichment and isolation on mCCDA microaerobically at 42°C. Only one sample yielded Campylobacter, which was found to be Campylobacter jejuni with the novel genotype ST-2866. However, the methods employed to isolate Campylobacter readily yielded Arcobacter from 73.5% of the floodwater samples. The Arcobacter isolates failed to grow on Mueller-Hinton agar at 25, 30, 37 or 42°C microaerobically or aerobically, but could be readily s...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
Authors: Abebe E, Gugsa G, Ahmed M Abstract Food-borne microorganisms are major pathogens affecting food safety and cause human illness worldwide as a result of consumption of foodstuff, mainly animal products contaminated with vegetative pathogens or their toxins. Most of these microbes have zoonotic importance resulting in significant impact on both public health and economic sectors. Bacteria are the causative agents of two-thirds of human food-borne diseases worldwide with high burden in developing countries. Hence, the objectives of this review paper are to highlight the background of food-borne bacterial path...
Source: Journal of Tropical Medicine - Category: Tropical Medicine Tags: J Trop Med Source Type: research
Campylobacter is a zoonotic pathogen that causes foodborne diarrheal illness globally. To better understand health risks in Southeastern China, Campylobacter spp. were surveyed in humans and representative poultry products over 3 years. One hundred and ninety-five representative isolates (n = 148, Campylobacter jejuni; n = 45, Campylobacter coli; n = 2 Campylobacter hyointestinalis) were examined for genetic relatedness and antimicrobial susceptibility. Nearly all Campylobacter isolates (99.0%, 193/195) were resistant to at least one class of antimicrobials, and 45.6% (89/195) of the isolates exhibited multidrug resistance...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we utilized strand specific high-throughput RNAseq to identify potential targets or interactive partners of CjNC110 in a sheep abortion clone of C. jejuni. These data were then utilized to focus further phenotypic evaluation of the role of CjNC110 in motility, autoagglutination, quorum sensing, hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, and chicken colonization in C. jejuni. Inactivation of the CjNC110 ncRNA led to a statistically significant decrease in autoagglutination ability as well as increased motility and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity compared to the wild-type. Extracellular AI-2 detection was decreased in CjNC1...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Molecular Pathogenesis Source Type: research
Conclusion: Several native plants from the Sub-Saharan Africa region were studied for in vitro activity against Campylobacter spp. Some plants seemed very effective against the bacteria. Chemical compounds from three plants have been isolated and analyzed, but further studies are needed in order to produce new and effective drugs. PMID: 32508957 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Modern agriculture has dramatically changed the distribution of animal species on Earth. Changes to host ecology have a major impact on the microbiota, potentially increasing the risk of zoonotic pathogens being transmitted to humans, but the impact of intensive livestock production on host-associated bacteria has rarely been studied. Here, we...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
In conclusion, although some antibiotic residues may be present in both manure and soil at concentrations to exert selective pressure, it seems that antibiotic resistance is mostly introduced directly to soil through fertilization with animal manure. PMID: 32410188 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Sci Pollut Res Int Source Type: research
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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