Why dizziness is likely to increase the risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in elderly adults.

Why dizziness is likely to increase the risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in elderly adults. N Z Med J. 2020 Sep 25;133(1522):112-127 Authors: Smith PF Abstract Dementia is recognised to be one of the most challenging diseases facing society, both now and in the future, with its prevalence estimated to increase substantially by 2050. The potential contributions of age-related sensory deficits have attracted little attention until recently, when a landmark study suggested that hearing loss could be a greater risk factor for dementia than hypertension, obesity, smoking, depression, physical inactivity or social isolation. Over the last decade, evidence has been gradually accumulating to suggest that the other part of the inner ear, the balance organs or 'vestibular system', might also be important in the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Increasing evidence suggests that dizziness associated with vestibular dysfunction, a common reason for patients consulting their GPs, increases the risk of cognitive dysfunction, including dementia, and our understanding of the basic neurobiology of this sensory system supports this view. This paper aims to review and critically evaluate the relevant evidence. PMID: 32994621 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research

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The objective of this review was to summarize the findings of the INPH-CRasH study. METHODS: VRFs, comorbidities, QOL, and adverse events were analyzed in consecutive patients with INPH who underwent shunt placement between 2008 and 2010 in 5 of 6 neurosurgical centers in Sweden. Patients (n = 176, within the age span of 60-85 years and not having dementia) were compared to population-based age- and gender-matched controls (n = 368, same inclusion criteria as for the patients with INPH). Assessed parameters were as follows: hypertension; diabetes; obesity; hyperlipidemia; psychosocial factors (stress and depression); ...
Source: Neurosurgical Focus - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Neurosurg Focus Source Type: research
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Source: Ethnicity and Disease - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ethn Dis Source Type: research
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Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Fatigue Memory Sleep Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
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