Mild Systemic Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest Using a Frozen Elephant Trunk Graft with Endo-Balloon Occlusion for Total Arch Replacement.

Mild Systemic Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest Using a Frozen Elephant Trunk Graft with Endo-Balloon Occlusion for Total Arch Replacement. Heart Surg Forum. 2020 Sep 23;23(5):E673-E676 Authors: Goto Y, Hosoba S, Fukumoto Y, Takagi S, Yanagisawa J Abstract BACKGROUND: Stroke and paraplegia are serious complications of total aortic arch replacement (TAR). Hypothermic circulatory arrest and cerebral perfusion reduce the risk of neurologic complications, but longer circulatory arrest time remains a risk factor for such complications. We utilized a frozen elephant trunk (FET) with endo-balloon occlusion under mild systemic hypothermia, which allowed us to shorten circulatory arrest time. METHODS: Between April 2007 and May 2020, 72 patients underwent elective TAR using antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP). They were divided into 2 groups. 64 patients received conventional TAR with moderate systemic hypothermic (bladder temperature, 25-28°C) circulatory arrest (group C). We used a FET with endo-balloon occlusion and retrograde perfusion through the femoral artery for the newest 8 patients who had mild hypothermic (bladder temperature of 30°C) circulatory arrest (group B). RESULTS: The mean operation time (257.5 ± 42.1 versus 327.8 ± 84.9 min, P = .023), CPB time (144.4 ± 28.1 versus 178.2 ± 26.4 min, P = .003), cardiac arrest time (75.5 ± 21.2 versus 95.7 ± 56.4 min, P
Source: The Heart Surgery Forum - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Heart Surg Forum Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: The frozen elephant trunk procedure can be used for a single-stage treatment of patients with extensive aortic pathology, due to chronic degenerative aneurysms or post-dissection aneurysms involving the aortic arch and the descending aorta, with acceptable mortality and morbidity. PMID: 32990581 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Heart Surgery Forum - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Heart Surg Forum Source Type: research
Abstract Cerebral edema is a pathological hallmark of various central nervous system (CNS) insults, including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and excitotoxic injury such as stroke. Due to the rigidity of the skull, edema-induced increase of intracranial fluid significantly complicates severe CNS injuries by raising intracranial pressure and compromising perfusion. Mortality due to cerebral edema is high. With mortality rates up to 80% in severe cases of stroke, it is the leading cause of death within the first week. Similarly, cerebral edema is devastating for patients of TBI, accounting for up to 50% mortality. Curr...
Source: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Acta Pharmacol Sin Source Type: research
ConclusionCCMSP is a safe and reproducible strategy for cerebral, myocardial and visceral protection in neonatal aortic arch repair, with or without VSD closure, resulting in low complication and mortality.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
In this study, 5% of VF arrest was due to PE: V fib is initial rhythm in PE in 3 of 60 cases. On the other hand, if the presenting rhythm is PEA, then pulmonary embolism is likely.  When there is VF in PE, it is not the initial rhythm, but occurs after prolonged PEA renders the myocardium ischemic.--Another study by Courtney and Kline found that, of cases of arrest that had autopsy and found that a presenting rhythm of VF/VT had an odds ratio of 0.02 for massive pulmonary embolism as the etiology, vs 41.9 for PEA.    ===================================MY Comment by KEN ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsFor patients without aortic dissection and who require more than 30 minutes of circulatory arrest, optimal cerebral protection strategies are deep hypothermia with either antegrade or retrograde cerebral perfusion and moderate hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
This study proposes a multi-center RCT in order to compare outcomes of warmer hypothermic strategies during aortic hemiarch surgery on a composite endpoint of neurologic and acute kidney injury (AKI).Methods/designThis is a prospective multi-center, single-blind two-arm RCT comparing mild (32  °C) versus moderate (26 °C) hypothermic cardiac arrest in patients (n = 282) undergoing hemiarch surgery with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP). The primary endpoint is a composite of neurological injury (incidence of transient ischemic attack and/or stroke) and Kidney Disease Improving Global Out...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
ConclusionsFor patients without dissection and requiring>30 minutes circulatory arrest, optimal cerebral protection strategies are deep hypothermia with either antegrade or retrograde cerebral perfusion; or moderate hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion.
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: For patients without dissection and requiring>30 minutes circulatory arrest, optimal cerebral protection strategies are deep hypothermia with either antegrade or retrograde cerebral perfusion; or moderate hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion. PMID: 31563489 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 July 2019Source: Journal of Thermal BiologyAuthor(s): Yannick Lutz, Axel Loewe, Stephan Meckel, Olaf Dössel, Giorgio CattaneoAbstractLocal brain hypothermia is an attractive method for providing cerebral neuroprotection for ischemic stroke patients and at the same time reducing systemic side effects of cooling. In acute ischemic stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, combination with endovascular mechanical recanalization treatment could potentially allow for an alleviation of inflammatory and apoptotic pathways in the critical phase of reperfusion. The direct cooling of arte...
Source: Journal of Thermal Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
In this issue of the Journal, Ghoreishi and colleagues1 have performed a tour de force in attempting to analyze 5 major factors potentially associated with stroke after type A aortic dissection repair. The etiology of stroke after aortic surgery is an entanglement of numerous complex factors that place patients at risk for both ischemic and embolic neurologic insults. Decisions about the extent of surgical repair, cannulation site, cerebral perfusion strategy, and degree of hypothermia are all interrelated.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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