Viruses, Vol. 12, Pages 409: Influenza PB1-F2 Inhibits Avian MAVS Signaling

Viruses, Vol. 12, Pages 409: Influenza PB1-F2 Inhibits Avian MAVS Signaling Viruses doi: 10.3390/v12040409 Authors: Yanna Xiao Danyel Evseev Chase A. Stevens Adam Moghrabi Domingo Miranzo-Navarro Ximena Fleming-Canepa David G. Tetrault Katharine E. Magor RIG-I plays an essential role in the duck innate immune response to influenza infection. RIG-I engages the critical adaptor protein mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) to activate the downstream signaling pathway. The influenza A virus non-structural protein PB1-F2 interacts with MAVS in human cells to inhibit interferon production. As duck and human MAVS share only 28% amino acid similarity, it is not known whether the influenza virus can similarly inhibit MAVS signaling in avian cells. Using confocal microscopy we show that MAVS and the constitutively active N-terminal end of duck RIG-I (2CARD) co-localize in DF-1 cells, and duck MAVS is pulled down with GST-2CARD. We establish that either GST-2CARD, or duck MAVS can initiate innate signaling in chicken cells and their co-transfection augments interferon-beta promoter activity. Demonstrating the limits of cross-species interactions, duck RIG-I 2CARD initiates MAVS signaling in chicken cells, but works poorly in human cells. The D122A mutation of human 2CARD abrogates signaling by affecting MAVS engagement, and the reciprocal A120D mutation in duck 2CARD improves signaling in human cells. We show mitochondrial localization of PB1-F2 from influenza ...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 19 May 2020Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Bao-Yang Ruan, Yun Yao, Shuai-Yong Wang, Xiao-Qian Gong, Xiao-Min Liu, Qi Wang, Ling-Xue Yu, Shi-Qiang Zhu, Juan Wang, Tong-Ling Shan, Yan-Jun Zhou, Wu Tong, Hao Zheng, Guo-Xin Li, Fei Gao, Ning Kong, Hai Yu, Guang-Zhi Tong
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
In addition to causing the pandemic influenza outbreaks of 1918 and 2009, subtype H1N1 influenza A viruses (IAVs) have caused seasonal epidemics since 1977. Antigenic property of influenza viruses are determin...
Source: BMC Bioinformatics - Category: Bioinformatics Authors: Tags: Methodology article Source Type: research
ez Sanvicente Sánchez-Betancourt Influenza, a zoonosis caused by various influenza A virus subtypes, affects a wide range of species, including humans. Pig cells express both sialyl-α-2,3-Gal and sialyl-α-2,6-Gal receptors, which make them susceptible to infection by avian and human viruses, respectively. To date, it is not known whether wild pigs in Mexico are affected by influenza virus subtypes, nor whether this would make them a potential risk of influenza transmission to humans. In this work, 61 hogs from two municipalities in Campeche, Mexico, were sampled. Hemagglutination inhibi...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
AbstractInactivated (whole-virion, split, subunit, and adjuvanted) vaccines and live attenuated vaccine were tested in parallel to compare their immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Homologous and heterosubtypic protection against the challenge with influenza H5N1 and H1N1 viruses in a mouse model were studied. Single immunization with live or inactivated whole-virion H5N1 vaccine elicited a high level of serum antibodies and provided complete protection against the challenge with the lethal A/Chicken/Kurgan/3/05 (H5N1) virus, whereas application of a single dose of the split vaccine was much less effective. Adjuvants i...
Source: Biochemistry (Moscow) - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
In conclusion, we have shown that PB2 or NS gene RT-PCRs are suitable alternatives to the recommended M gene RT-PCR for diagnosis of IAV. Long-read nanopore sequencing facilitates the identification of novel diagnostic targets.
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Virology Source Type: research
Abstract Actinobacteria are historically and continued to be an important source for drug discovery. The annual epidemics and periodic pandemics of humans induced by influenza A virus (IAV) prompted us to develop new effective antiviral drugs with different modes of action. An actinobacterium of Streptomyces sp. SMU 03 was identified from the feces of Elephas maximus in Yunnan Province, China. By employing an H5N1 pseudo-typed virus drug screening system, the anti-IAV effect of the dichloromethane extracts (DCME) of this bacterium was investigated. DCME showed broad and potent activities against several influenza ...
Source: Fitoterapia - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Fitoterapia Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONThe pre ‐​COVID‐​19 research is unanimous that governments cannot expect to rely on travel restrictions to prevent the spread of pandemics similar to influenza. Travel restrictions do not prevent the spread of disease and may only delay it for a few days or weeks if implemented prior to the interna tional transmission of the disease. The Trump administration’s travel restrictions waited until after the virus had already entered the United States, and they exempted many travelers from China, not to mention the rest of the world.[30]The research shows that the Trump administration should have kno...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Abstract In 2018, the world commemorated the centennial of the 1918 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic, the deadliest pandemic in recorded history; however, little mention was made of the 50th anniversary of the 1968 A(H3N2) pandemic. Although pandemic morbidity and mortality were much lower in 1968 than in 1918, influenza A(H3N2) virus infections have become the leading cause of seasonal influenza illness and death over the last 50 years, with more than twice the number of hospitalizations from A(H3N2) as from A(H1N1) during the past six seasons. We review the emergence, progression, clinical course, etiology, epidemiolo...
Source: American Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Am J Public Health Source Type: research
Abstract Hemagglutinins (HAs) from human influenza viruses adapt to bind α2-6-linked sialosides, overcoming a receptor-defined species barrier distinct from the α2-3 specificity of avian virus progenitors. Additionally, human-adapted HAs gain glycosylation sites over time, although their biological function is poorly defined. Using quantitative glycomic analysis, we show that HAs from human pandemic viruses exhibit significant proportions of high-mannose type N-linked glycans throughout the head domain. By contrast, poorly adapted avian-origin HAs contain predominately complex-type glycans, which have ...
Source: Cell Host and Microbe - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Cell Host Microbe Source Type: research
More News: Bird Flu | H1N1 | Influenza | Mitochondria | Virology