Circadian and Sleep Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease.

Circadian and Sleep Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease. Ageing Res Rev. 2020 Mar 11;:101046 Authors: Uddin MS, Tewari D, Mamun AA, Kabir MT, Niaz K, Wahed MII, Barreto GE, Ashraf GM Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating and irreversible cognitive impairment and the most common type of dementia. Along with progressive cognitive impairment, dysfunction of the circadian rhythms also play a pivotal role in the progression of AD. A mutual relationship among circadian rhythms, sleep, and AD has been well-recommended. The etiopathogenesis of the disturbances of the circadian system and AD share some general features that also unlock the outlook of observing them as a mutually dependent pathway. Indeed, the burden of amyloid β (Aβ), neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and dysfunction of circadian rhythms may lead to AD. Aging can alter both sleep timings and quality that can be strongly disrupted in AD. Increased production of Aβ and reduced Aβ clearance are caused by a close interplay of Aβ, sleep disturbance and raised wakefulness. Besides Aβ, the impact of tau pathology is possibly noteworthy to the sleep deprivation found in AD. This review is focused on the primary mechanistic complexities linked to disruption of circadian rhythms, sleep deprivation, and AD. Furthermore, this review also highlights the potential therapeutic strategy to abate Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID: 3217...
Source: Ageing Research Reviews - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Ageing Res Rev Source Type: research

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(Natural News) Studies have shown that there’s a relationship between dementia and exercise, nutrition and social interaction. One other important factor you need to consider if you want to lower your risk of Alzheimer’s disease is the amount of restful sleep you get every night. In a landmark study published in the journal The Lancet, researchers found that around a...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study aimed to systematically review the literature and determine which behavioral and psychological symptoms are most predictive of future cognitive decline among individuals with no pre-existing cognitive impairments. The selected studies included middle-aged or older adults without cognitive impairments. The predictors were assessed using behavioral and psychological questionnaires, or diagnostic interviews, to identify non-cognitive symptoms or psychiatric clinical conditions. The follow-up period was at least one year, and the design of the selected studies was either retrospective or prospective. This study comp...
Source: Neuropsychology Review - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
...No rest for the caregiver. I climbed back in the car and fought my way through the streets to Mom. It wasn’t another false alarm. Mom really had fallen, and as usually happens after a fall, I couldn’t get her up off the floor by myself. I had to call the EMTs — again. Thankfully, this time she wasn’t seriously hurt. Hours later, once I’d settled Mom in her bed, I forced my way back through the still unplowed streets toward home, hoping for a couple of hours of sleep before morning, when I had to take my uncle to his neurology appointment for a post-stroke checkup. Still somewhat cohere...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Abstract As we age, sleep patterns undergo severe modifications of their micro and macrostructure, with an overall lighter and more fragmented sleep structure. In general, interventions targeting sleep represent an excellent opportunity not only to maintain life quality in the healthy aging population, but also to enhance cognitive performance and, when pathology arises, to potentially prevent/slow down conversion from e.g. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Sleep abnormalities are, in fact, one of the earliest recognizable biomarkers of dementia, being also partially responsible for a ca...
Source: Ageing Research Reviews - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Ageing Res Rev Source Type: research
Authors: Gholamnezhad Z, Boskabady MH, Jahangiri Z Abstract Several experimental and human studies documented the preventive and therapeutic effects of exercise on various diseases as well as the normal physiological function of different systems during aging. The findings of several basic animal studies and clinical investigations identified the advantageous effects of exercise as non-pharmaceutical intervention on dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main positive effects suggested for exercise are less cognitive and behavioral impairment or decline, development of health-associated conditions (stress, slee...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Nrf2 deficiency promoted the increasing trend of autophagy during aging in skeletal muscle. Nrf2 deficiency and increasing age may cause excessive autophagy in skeletal muscle, which can be a potential mechanism for the development of sarcopenia. To What Degree is Chondrocyte Hypertrophy in Osteoarthritis Due to Cellular Senescence? https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/to-what-degree-is-chondrocyte-hypertrophy-in-osteoarthritis-due-to-cellular-senescence/ Senescent cells are large. They do not replicate, that function is disabled, but it is as if they go ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, elevated brain amyloid was associated with family history and APOE ε4 allele but not with multiple other previously reported risk factors for AD. Elevated amyloid was associated with lower test performance results and increased reports of subtle recent declines in daily cognitive function. These results support the hypothesis that elevated amyloid represents an early stage in the Alzheimer's continuum. Blood Metabolites as a Marker of Frailty https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/04/blood-metabolites-as-a-marker-of-frailty/ Frailty in older people is usually diagnosed in a sympt...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Alzheimer's Disease (AD) therapeutics based on the amyloid hypothesis have repeatedly failed in clinical trials. Together with numerous reports that amyloid is present in brains from aged individuals without cognitive dysfunction, this suggests that the association of amyloid with AD is collateral rather than causal. The preeminence of the amyloid hypothesis has resulted in the 'systematic …thwart[ing of] alternative approaches' to AD/dementia driven by a 'cabal' of amyloid acolytes who have effectively controlled the ideas funded and published, which startups received venture investment and which ...
Source: Biochemical Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Biochem Pharmacol Source Type: research
As the population ages, the incidence of chronic diseases such as dementia increases. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is one of the most common dementias after Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and it is characterized clinically by a tetrad consisting of visual hallucinations, spontaneous parkinsonism, REM sleep behavior disorders and dementia [1]. The diagnosis of DLB is challenging. Despite the validated diagnostic criteria, only one in three cases is correctly identified. These criteria have a low sensitivity of 32%, while its specificity has been reported in 95% when its diagnostic accuracy is compared to autopsy [1].
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
A compelling and robust body of research suggests that modifiable risk factor reduction could substantially impact risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia. The evidence is strongest for cardiovascular risk factors as well as lifestyle risk factors including both physical and cognitive activity while promising data is also emerging for sleep disorders and traumatic brain injury. Cumulatively, the data supports modifiable risk factor reduction at the population-based level, with increasing evidence for multi-domain interventions.
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Session PL1 Source Type: research
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