Expression of concern: The cancer/coronary-heart-disease and personality publications in personality and individual differences, authored by professors R. Grossarth-Maticek and H.J. Eysenck

Publication date: 1 June 2020Source: Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 159Author(s): Donald H. Saklofske
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

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Conclusions: We developed an individualized, outcome-optimized planning technique for HL. Some of the resulting plans were substantially different from clinical plans. The results varied depending on how risk models were defined or prioritized. PMID: 32216586 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acta Oncologica - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Acta Oncol Source Type: research
Abstract Coronary heart disease kills twice as many women as breast cancer in the UK and is the single biggest killer of women worldwide. Underlying risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and smoking. Mulder and colleagues have performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature and demonstrated that women with infertility are significantly more likely to have certain cardiometabolic risk factors, namely increased BMI, cholesterol and triglycerides, when compared with fertile women. PMID: 32191381 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
We present a prospective cohort study of postmenopausal women. This cohort was divided into two groups: the «benign diagnosis group», including women who were studied after breast cancer screening; and the «malignant tumor group», including patients with breast cancer that had been diagnosed by biopsy. Age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), abdominal perimeter, serum glucose, LDL, HDL and insulin levels were analyzed as variables under study. The HOMA-IR homeostatic model formula was used to assess insulin resistance. The differences were considered statistically significant when P2.7 (P
Source: Cirugia eEspanola - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Cir Esp Source Type: research
You may have already heard the term “insulin resistance,” as it has been widely discussed by doctors and the media. But did you know that you can reduce or reverse it in the vast majority of people? Insulin resistance, i.e., the inability of the body’s cells, especially liver, muscle, and brain, to respond to insulin and allow blood sugar to enter cells, drives numerous abnormal health conditions including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, fatty liver, Alzheimer’s dementia, and cancer. It is therefore a driving force behind so many modern and common chronic health conditions. Yo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open can belly fat can insulin resistance be reversed lose weight reduce belly fat reverse inflammation visceral fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Authors: Yang QY, Li XF, Lin MQ, Xu JH, Yan H, Zhang ZM, Wang SY, Chen HC, Chen XN, Lin KY, Guo YS Abstract Background: The number of patients suffering from coronary heart disease with cancer is rising. There is scarce evidence concerning the biomarkers related to prognosis among patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with cancer. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and prognosis in this population.Methods: A total of 172 patients undergoing PCI with previous history of cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study....
Source: Biomarkers - Category: Research Tags: Biomarkers Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We found an inverse association between seaweed intake and cardiovascular mortality among Japanese men and women, especially that from cerebral infarction. PMID: 32132341 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis - Category: Cardiology Tags: J Atheroscler Thromb Source Type: research
THURSDAY, March 5, 2020 -- Omega-3 fatty acids do not appear to protect against cancer and may only have a small beneficial effect in coronary heart disease, according to two reviews published online Feb. 29 in the British Journal of Cancer and the...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Social stigmas related to depression and anxiety may lead to the underreporting of FMD. Chronic disease management programs in Illinois should consider integrating mental health services. PMID: 32133865 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Am J Health Promot Source Type: research
In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(University of East Anglia) Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer -- according to new University of East Anglia research. Increased consumption of omega-3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against, or even reverse, diseases such as cancer, heart attacks and stroke. But two systematic reviews find that omega-3 supplements may slightly reduce coronary heart disease mortality and events, but slightly increase risk of prostate cancer. Both beneficial and harmful effects are small.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
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