Flies from a tertiary hospital in Rwanda carry multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli sequence type 131

AbstractMultidrug-resistant gram-negative (MRGN) bacteria are a serious threat to global health. We used genomics to study MRGN obtained from houseflies in a tertiary Rwandan hospital. Our analysis revealed a high abundance of different MRGN includingE. coli pathogenic lineage ST131 suggesting the important role of flies in disseminating highly virulent pathogens in clinical settings and beyond.
Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Abstract The aim of this article is to report on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in commensal Escherichia coli from livestock from several European countries. The relationships with antimicrobial usage (AMU) at country level and harmonized indicators to cover the most relevant AMR aspects for human health in animal production were also investigated. E. coli were isolated in faeces from broilers and fattening pigs (from nine countries), and fattening turkeys and veal calves (from three countries) and screened against a fixed antimicrobial panel. AMU data were collected at farm and average treatment incidences strati...
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2020Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Volume 20Author(s): Mustafa Sadek, Laurent Poirel, Patrice Nordmann, Hirofumi Nariya, Toshi Shimamoto, Tadashi Shimamoto
Source: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
High quantities of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli are present in the Machángara urban river in Quito, Ecuador. J Water Health. 2020 Feb;18(1):67-76 Authors: Ortega-Paredes D, Barba P, Mena-López S, Espinel N, Crespo V, Zurita J Abstract Urban river pollution by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria constitutes an important public health concern. Epidemiologically important strains of MDR Escherichia coli transmissible at the human-animal-environment interfaces are especially worrying. Quantifying and characterizing MDR E. coli at a molecular level is thus imperative for understanding i...
Source: Journal of Water and Health - Category: Environmental Health Tags: J Water Health Source Type: research
ConclusionsARB, as defined by growth on screening agar plates, which carried mobile resistance genes or elements or conferred high biofilm formation, were already prevalent in the oral cavity of LTCF residents. Health-care workers involved in oral care should be aware of antimicrobial resistance and pay special attention to transmission prevention and infection control measures to diminish ARB or mobile resistance elements dissemination in LTCFs.
Source: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Conclusion. This analysis provided an indirect assessment of the risk of transmission of AMR gastrointestinal pathogens from animals to humans, and revealed a subset of human isolates of the zoonotic pathogen STEC were resistant to the antimicrobials used in animal husbandry. However, this proportion has not increased over the last three decades, and thismay provide evidence that guidancepromoting responsible practice has been effective. PMID: 32101158 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: J Med Microbiol Source Type: research
This study aimed to characterize ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Nile perch and water from Lake Victoria in Tanzania. A total of 180 samples of Nile perch and 60 water samples were screened for ESBL-producing E. coli on MacConkey agar supplemented with 2 μg/ml of cefotaxime and confirmed by blaCTX–M and blaTEM PCR. Antimicrobial resistance was determined by the disk diffusion method, and the ESBL-producing isolates were whole genome sequencing (WGS). ESBL-producing E. coli were detected in eight of the 180 analyzed Nile perch samples, and only one water sample was positive (1.7%, n = 60). Isolates were resistan...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this report, we investigated six RND efflux-responsive regulatory genes for contributions to V. cholerae virulence factor production. Our data showed that the V. cholerae gene VC2714, encoding a homolog of Escherichia coli OmpR, was a virulence repressor. The expression of ompR was elevated in an RND-null mutant, and ompR deletion partially restored virulence factor production in the RND-negative background. Virulence inhibitory activity in the RND-negative background resulted from OmpR repression of the key ToxR regulon virulence activator aphB, and ompR overexpression in wild-type cells also repressed virulence throug...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Molecular Pathogenesis Source Type: research
This study characterized Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and E. coli O157:H7 by collecting rectoanal mucosal swabs and fecal samples from 518 imported beef cattle at Jordan’s major abattoir. A unique 53 L. monocytogenes, 287 S. enterica, and 17 E. coli O157:H7 were isolated from 37, 120 and 9 different animals; respectively. The prevalence of S. enterica, L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 were 23.2% (95% CI, 19.7-27.0%), 7.1% (95% CI, 5.2-9.7%) and 1.7% (95% CI, 0.9-3.3%); respectively. All L. monocytogenes, all E. coli O157:H7 and 93.0% of S. enterica isolates resisted at least one antimicrobial clas...
Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
This study characterized Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and E. coli O157:H7 by collecting rectoanal mucosal swabs and fecal samples from 518 imported beef cattle at Jordan's major abattoir. A unique 53 L. monocytogenes, 287 S. enterica, and 17 E. coli O157:H7 were isolated from 37, 120 and 9 different animals; respectively. The prevalence of S. enterica, L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 were 23.2 % (95 % CI, 19.7-27.0 %), 7.1 % (95 % CI, 5.2-9.7 %) and 1.7 % (95 % CI, 0.9-3.3 %); respectively. All L. monocytogenes, all E. coli O157:H7 and 93.0 % of S. enterica isolates resisted at least one antimicrobial ...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Broad-spectrum antibiotics were common in patients with haematological malignancies in Japan; however, antibiotic-resistant bacteria including carbapenem-resistant or multidrug-resistant bacteria were infrequent. Our results provide nationwide, cross-sectional insight into the use of antimicrobial agents, prevalence of bacteria, and antibiotic resistance, demonstrating differences in antimicrobial utilization among different haematological diseases. PMID: 32066448 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob Source Type: research
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