Heart attack: Look out for this symptom on your fingernails - it could signal your risk

A HEART attack can be a deadly occurrence. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of it, and there's a noticeable symptom just on your fingernails that could indicate you have the disease.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 32222118 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cell Biology International - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Biol Int Source Type: research
This study was designed as a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, superiority trial. Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio through a centrally controlled, computer-generated, simple randomization schedule. The primary outcome was left ventricular end-diastolic volume index  = left ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area. The combined secondary outcomes include traditional Chinese medicine syndrome score, echocardiogram results, 6-minute walk test results, Seattle Angina Questionnaire score, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results, biological ind...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Abstract Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common and serious illness in the world and has been researched for many years. However, there are still no real effective ways to prevent and save patients with this disease. When patients present with myocardial infarction, the most important step is to recover ischemic prefusion, which usually is accomplished by coronary artery bypass surgery, coronary artery intervention (PCI), or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). These are invasive procedures, and patients with extensive lesions cannot tolerate surgery. It is, therefore, extremely urgent to search for a ...
Source: Cardiology Research and Practice - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Cardiol Res Pract Source Type: research
You may have already heard the term “insulin resistance,” as it has been widely discussed by doctors and the media. But did you know that you can reduce or reverse it in the vast majority of people? Insulin resistance, i.e., the inability of the body’s cells, especially liver, muscle, and brain, to respond to insulin and allow blood sugar to enter cells, drives numerous abnormal health conditions including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, fatty liver, Alzheimer’s dementia, and cancer. It is therefore a driving force behind so many modern and common chronic health conditions. Yo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open can belly fat can insulin resistance be reversed lose weight reduce belly fat reverse inflammation visceral fat wheat belly Source Type: blogs
An American research team investigated the link between egg consumption and cases of CVD - including non-fatal heart attack, fatal coronary heart disease and stroke.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The clinical work on lowering blood cholesterol that has taken place over recent years has demonstrated that if there is a lower limit beyond which low cholesterol levels become harmful, then that limit is very low indeed. Certainly below 10% of the normal human level. There are a number of uncommon mutations that produce individuals with up to half of the normal amount of blood cholesterol, people who exhibit significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular disease as a result of this difference from the norm. This is all quite interesting: why did we evolve to have the blood cholesterol that we do, if we need only a small fr...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, is the leading cause of death and disease burden globally [1]. CVD resulted in>1.1 million hospitalisations in 2015-16, and incurs the highest level of health care sector expenditure in Australia (11-12% of total health expenditure) [2]. CHD accounts for the greatest single disease morbidity (>500,000 bed-days annually) and nearly one fifth of all deaths with a total cost of $1.14 billion annually [2]. Over 65,000 Australians experience an acute coronary event (heart attack or unstable angina) each year [3], and, importantly, around a th...
Source: Heart, Lung and Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Abstract Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the major cause of death in modern society. CHD is characterized by atherosclerosis, which could lead to vascular cavity stenosis or obstruction, resulting in ischemic cardiac conditions such as angina and myocardial infarction. In terms of the mitochondrion, the main function is to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for cells. And the alterations (including mutations, altered copy number and haplogroups) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with the abnormal expression of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction, then leadi...
Source: Experimental and Molecular Pathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Exp Mol Pathol Source Type: research
and Stroke Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; and Stroke Council Abstract Epidemiological and biological plausibility studies support a cause-and-effect relationship between increased levels of physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness and reduced coronary heart disease events. These data, plus the well-documented anti-aging effects of exercise, have likely contributed to the escalating numbers of adults who have embraced the notion that "more exercise is better." As a result, worldwide participation in endurance training, competitive long distance endurance events, and high-intensity interva...
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
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