Meds are not a ‘free pass’ to start or maintain bad habits

People who started CVD meds were more likely to gain weight and cut exercise, as well as to drink less and quit smoking Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Vitamin D supplements do not confer cardiovascular protection Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Periodontal disease is conventionally defined as an inflammatory condition affecting the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth (i.e. gum and periodontium). Recent statistics show that the prevalence of this condition is continuously growing worldwide, thus raising severe healthcare concerns, not only for local problems emerging from poor oral health, but also for the potential risk of developing systemic complications. Therefore, this article aims to provide an update on the intriguing association between periodontitis, coronary heart disease (CHD) and/or myocardial infarction (MI). Taken together, the available pub...
Source: Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis - Category: Hematology Tags: REVIEW ARTICLES Source Type: research
The COVID crisis has decimated water exercise. Can we rethink pool closures? A significant number of my older patients relied on pools for their fitness. During a pandemic, you can stay active or fit only if you have good legs and joints. Walkers, runners, and cyclists have no problem; they play outside in the Spring weather. People with bone/joint problems, fitness swimmers, and young children who normally take swim lessons this time of year are out of luck. Consider the place I swim—the Mary T Meagher Natatorium, named after Mary T, a Louisville native, who won Olympic gold in 1984. The place is an ode to Sp...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Prevalence set to soar by 40% among older people in eight major country markets, including the UK, forecast suggests Related items fromOnMedica Coronary heart disease remains UK ’s biggest killer Women less likely than men to achieve CHD targets Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised NICE says far more people should take statins Apply different obesity criteria to BME patients
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Authors: Mühleck F, Laufs U Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle modifications and drug treatment of cardiovascular risk factors are able to effectively prevent CAD. The basis of prevention is the assessment of the individual cardiovascular risk, e.g. by using a validated risk score. Documented evidence for prevention of CAD is available for the control of hypertension using angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and calcium antagonists, for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia using ...
Source: Herz - Category: Cardiology Tags: Herz Source Type: research
Understanding risks early on could help protect from disease later in life and ‘offer chance to take statins or adjust diet’All adults as young as 25, as well as older people, need to know of their “bad cholesterol” levels so they can change their lifestyle or take drugs to protect themselves against heart attacks or strokes in later life, say scientists.A landmark study involving data from nearly 400,000 people in 19 countries has established for the first time that levels of non-HDL, or “bad cholesterol”, in the blood are closely linked to the risk of heart disease across the entire li...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: UK news Health Heart attack Stroke Young people Older people Nutrition Science Obesity World news Source Type: news
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
For decades, doctors have known that losing weight can significantly lower risk of heart disease and by extension, reduce the risk of dying from heart-related events such as stroke and heart attack. Studies have shown that both lifestyle changes including diet and exercise as well as medications and weight-loss surgery can improve heart disease risk factors such as obesity and diabetes, for example, but data supporting the benefits of any of these approaches in actually lowering rates of heart events such as heart attack and atrial fibrillation, or in reducing early deaths from heart disease, have been less robust. The dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diabetes Heart Disease Source Type: news
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined 9293 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of total cholesterol, free- and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, and particle concentration. Fourteen subclasses of decreasing size and their lipid constituents were analysed: six subclasses were very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), one intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), three low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and four subclasses were high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Remnant lipoproteins were VLDL and IDL combined. Mean nonfasting cholesterol concentration was 72...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
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