Treatment for depression comorbid with dementia: A clinical review

Depression is a common comorbidity in dementia. Randomised controlled studies of antidepressants do not show a significant improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with comorbid dementia and are known to lead to an increase in side effects. However, there are relatively few studies of depression in dementia, and drawing firm conclusions about the use of antidepressants is limited by the amount of data available. Furthermore, it is unclear whether data can be extrapolated from similar populations (eg, those with late-life depression) to inform pharmacotherapy in this patient group. Given the lack of effectiveness and risk of side effects associated with pharmacological treatments, psychological interventions may offer important therapeutic benefits. There is evidence for the effectiveness of individual psychological therapy, and further research will establish which psychological approach is the most effective. Some studies have shown an improvement in depressive symptoms using structured sleep hygiene programmes, exercise, arts interventions and music therapy. These studies are hampered by small data sets, and the benefits to individuals may not be well captured by standard outcome measures. At present, the best evidence for arts-based approaches is in music therapy. Depression with comorbid dementia responds well to electroconvulsive therapy and this is a useful treatment modality for those with severe or life-threatening depressive symptoms. Alternative neurostimulati...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 15 February 2020Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Filip Kosel, Jessica M.S. Pelley, Tamara B. FranklinAbstractTransgenic mouse models have been used extensively to model the cognitive impairments arising from Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related pathology. However, less is known about the relationship between AD-related pathology and the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) commonly presented by patients. This review discusses the BPSD-like behaviours recapitulated by several mouse models of AD-related pathology, including the APP/PS1, Tg2576...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This article summarizes the milestones in the development of lumateperone leading to this first approval for the treatment of schizophrenia.
Source: Drugs - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle subgroups of patients were determined by stress, emotional problems, and age. The groups were significantly associated with Aβ42 and diagnostic outcome. This pattern may confound the differentiation between objective and subjective memory problems. Asking about lifestyle variables, in conjunction with neuropsychological testing, could potentially identify individuals who are not likely to have objective memory impairment and guide interventions. PMID: 31982880 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
Sleep disturbances such as insomnia are extremely common, especially in women after menopause. According to data from the National Institutes of Health, sleep disturbance varies from 16% to 42% before menopause, from 39% to 47% during perimenopause, and from 35% to 60% after menopause. Insomnia is a serious medical problem defined by frequent difficulty falling or staying asleep that impacts a person’s life in a negative way. Hormone changes around menopause can lead to sleep problems for many reasons, including changing sleep requirements, increased irritability, and hot flashes. What menopausal women eat could have...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Food as medicine Healthy Eating Menopause Nutrition Sleep Source Type: blogs
Daytime exposure to bright lights may improve a person ’s quality of sleep, and could reduce depressive symptoms and agitation associated with dementia
Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
Conclusion: Media attention on concussion has greatly increased in the last several years, as interest in the possible contribution of concussion(s) to CTE grows. This media attention has some adverse effects in that it creates a false perception about the current state of the science and may engender iatrogenic effects. The proposed model is offered as one approach to engage patients within this context. PMID: 31847694 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Clinical Neuropsychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Clin Neuropsychol Source Type: research
Conclusions:A lighting intervention tailored to maximally entrain the circadian system can improve sleep, mood, and behavior in patients with dementia living in controlled environments.Clinical Trial Registration:Registry:ClinicalTrials.gov, title: Methodology Issues in a Tailored Light Treatment for Persons With Dementia, URL:https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01816152, identifier: NCT01816152.Citation:Figueiro MG, Plitnick B, Roohan C, Sahin L, Kalsher M, Rea MS. Effects of a tailored lighting intervention on sleep quality, rest–activity, mood, and behavior in older adults with Alzheimer disease and related dem...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news
What exactly is psychosis? What happens in the brain of a person with schizophrenia who is hallucinating? Schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers shares her personal hallucinations and delusions and Dr. Joseph Goldberg, who specializes in researching what goes on in the brain when someone is experiencing psychosis, joins to break down how the brain functions during psychotic episodes. Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of Inside Schizophrenia.  Highlights from “Psychosis in Schizophrenia” Episode [02:13]  Rachel, do...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Disorders General Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Active psychosis Delusions Delusions Hallucinations Living with Schizoprenia Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychology psychotic Psychotic Break Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: We found no evidence that long-term exposure to work-related sleep loss had resulted in cognitive decline or early dementia symptoms in this sample of retired maritime pilots. PMID: 31726459 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
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