IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 606: Serum Levels of Commonly Detected Persistent Organic Pollutants and Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) and Mammographic Density in Postmenopausal Women

IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 606: Serum Levels of Commonly Detected Persistent Organic Pollutants and Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) and Mammographic Density in Postmenopausal Women International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17020606 Authors: Lee Kinninger Ursin Tseng Hurley Wang Park Petreas Deapen Reynolds Wang There are little epidemiological data on the impact of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and endocrine disruptors on mammographic density (MD), a strong predictor of breast cancer. We assessed MD in 116 non-Hispanic white post-menopausal women for whom serum concentrations of 23 commonly detected chemicals including 3 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 8 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), and 12 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) had been measured. Linear regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders were used to examine the associations between the levels of the chemical compounds, modeled as continuous and dichotomized (above/below median) variables, and square-root-transformed MD. None of the associations were statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing. Prior to correction for multiple testing, all chemicals with un-corrected p-values < 0.05 had regression coefficients less than zero, suggesting inverse associations between increased levels and MD, if any. The smallest p-value was observed for PCB-153 (regression coefficien...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Communication Source Type: research

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Abstract CONTEXT: Dense breast tissue is associated with 4-6 times higher risk of breast cancer by poorly understood mechanisms. No preventive therapy for this high-risk group is available. After menopause breast density decreases due to involution of the mammary gland. In dense breast tissue this process is haltered by undetermined biological actions. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like binding proteins (IGFBPs) play major roles in normal mammary gland development but their roles in maintaining breast density are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To reveal in vivo levels of GH, IGFBPs, and other pro-tumorigenic proteins ...
Source: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
ConclusionsBreast cancer risk among women with LCIS is impacted by breast density. These results aid in personalizing risk assessment among women with LCIS and highlight the importance of chemoprevention counseling for risk reduction.
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
rry State legislation in many U.S. states, including California, mandates informing women if they have dense breasts on screening mammography, meaning over half of their breast tissue is comprised of non-adipose tissue. Breast density is important to interpret screening sensitivity and is an established breast cancer risk factor. Environmental chemical exposures may play an important role in this, especially during key windows of susceptibility for breast development: in utero, during puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and the peri-menopause. There is a paucity of research, however, examining whether environmental chemical...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Communication Source Type: research
Abstract The breast is the leading cancer site in women throughout the world. That said, breast cancer incidence varies widely, ranging from 27/100,0002 (Central-East Asia and Africa) to 85-94/100,0002 (Australia, North America and Western Europe). Its frequency in France is among the highest in Europe. While in most countries, its incidence has been increasing for more than 40 years, in a few other countries (USA, Canada, Australia, France…), it has been decreasing since 2000-2005. Possibly due to a substantial reduction of hormone-based treatments at menopause, the decrease may be transient. It is al...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Breast density on mammography is a risk factor for breast cancer after adjustment for other risk factors. This risk is particularly high in postmenopausal women and those with a high BMI. PMID: 31650498 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Breast Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: research
You’re staring at a letter from your mammography facility. Your breast exam was normal, great. But then you see a note on the bottom: you have high breast density, which could put you at higher risk for breast cancer in the future. Now what? “The finding of dense breasts on a mammogram can be stressful and confusing for patients,” says Dr. Toni Golen, acting editor in chief of Harvard Women’s Health Watch. It’s information that may concern them, but they don’t know what to do about it. What is breast density? Breasts are composed of: lobules, which produce milk ducts, tubes that carry m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Health Tests and procedures Women's Health Source Type: blogs
We examined the relationship between intrauterine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure (o,p’-DDT, p,p’-DDT, and p,p’-DDE) and mammographic breast density (MBD) in midlife, one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. We focused our analyses on o,p’-DDT exposure given our previous report of a positive association between intrauterine o,p’-DDT exposure and daughter’s breast cancer (BC) risk. Here we estimated associations of intrauterine serum DDTs with MBD in 224 daughters of women in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort whose mothers did not develop...
Source: Reproductive Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeMammographic density (MD) is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, yet its relationship with tumor characteristics is not well established, particularly in Asian populations.MethodsMD was assessed from a total of 2001 Chinese breast cancer patients using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories. Molecular subtypes were defined using immunohistochemical status on ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67, as well as tumor grade. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test associations between MD and molecular subtype (luminal A  = reference) adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), me...
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewHere we aim to review the association between mammographic density, collagen structure, and breast cancer risk.Recent FindingsWhile mammographic density is a strong predictor of breast cancer risk in populations, studies by Boyd show that mammographic density does not predict breast cancer risk in individuals. Mammographic density is affected by age, parity, menopausal status, race/ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). New studies normalize mammographic density to BMI and this may provide a more accurate way to compare mammographic density in women of diverse race and ethnicity. Preclinical and tis...
Source: Current Breast Cancer Reports - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionAlthough the majority of screen-detected cancers are equal to more conspicuous on SM when compared to FFDM, calcifications and asymmetries
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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