It ’ s OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

(CNN) — Caesar salad lovers rejoice — your crispy romaine lettuce leaves are OK to eat now. The nationwide, monthslong E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce ended Wednesday, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration. The romaine, which came from Salinas, California, infected a total of 167 people in 27 states. This included 85 hospitalizations, including 15 patients who developed a type of kidney failure — hemolytic uremic syndrome — known to be associated with this particular type of bacteria, E. coli O157:H7. The toxin produced by the bacteria typically causes symptoms such as vomiting, stomach cramps and bloody diarrhea. No deaths have been linked to the outbreak. The onset of illnesses were reported between September 20 and December 21, 2019, and the outbreak affected people ranging in age from younger than 1 to 89. Nearly two-thirds of those impacted were female. The CDC no longer advises people to avoid lettuce from the Salinas Valley. The contaminated lettuce that sickened people during the outbreak is no longer being sold, the agency said. The FDA said its investigation into the source of the outbreak is continuing, and it plans to conduct another “in-depth, root-cause investigation” to explain how contamination occurred. Why E. coli loves leafy greens “Leafy greens, such as lettuce, can become contaminated in the field by soil, contaminated water, animals or im...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Romaine Lettuce Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 26 January 2020Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): Hanxu Pan, Kai Dong, Lei Rao, Liang Zhao, Xiaomeng Wu, Yongtao Wang, Xiaojun LiaoAbstractEscherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome in humans, has been implicated in large food-borne outbreaks all over the world. When confronted with harsh environmental stresses, it can enter into a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state, which poses a great risk to food safety and public health since conventional methods are invalid to detect VBNC cells. Herein, a system for detecting VBNC state Escheri...
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
The US Centers for Disease Control and the US Food and Drug Administration have declared that the recent nationwide E. Coli outbreak, which contaminated romaine lettuce, ended as of Wednesday. Authorities traced the outbreak back to the Salinas Valley growing region in California. The FDA has lifted a consumer advisory to avoid romaine lettuce from Salinas “as the growing season for this region is over and there is no longer a need for consumers to avoid it.” Health officials had previously advised consumers, retailers and restaurants to throw out any romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif. region. People...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news
Authors: Luna-Guevara JJ, Arenas-Hernandez MMP, Martínez de la Peña C, Silva JL, Luna-Guevara ML Abstract Many raw vegetables, such as tomato, chili, onion, lettuce, arugula, spinach, and cilantro, are incorporated into fresh dishes including ready-to-eat salads and sauces. The consumption of these foods confers a high nutritional value to the human diet. However, the number of foodborne outbreaks associated with fresh produce has been increasing, with Escherichia coli being the most common pathogen associated with them. In humans, pathogenic E. coli strains cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemoly...
Source: International Journal of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: Int J Microbiol Source Type: research
The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises consumers, retailers and restaurants throw out any romaine lettuce that was grown in the Salinas, Calif. region. The number of E. coli infections has increased to 102 cases reported in 23 states, including 10 cases of kidney failure, since the outbreak was declared late November. E. coli illnesses began in late September, according to the CDC, which is continuing to investigate if any other products can be linked to the outbreak. No common grower, supplier, distributor or brand of lettuce has been identified, the CDC reports. At least one case involves a child un...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
Ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advises consumers, retailers and restaurants throw out any romaine lettuce that was grown in the Salinas, Calif. region after 67 cases of E. coli have been reported in 19 states, including six cases of kidney failure. E. coli illnesses began in late September, according to the CDC, which is continuing to investigate if any other products can be linked to the outbreak. At least one case involves a 3-year-old child, and multiple cases involve children under 18 years old, CDC spokesperson Laura Whitlock tells TIME. “If it’s ro...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
We examined 252 rectal swabs obtained from 134 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 97 red deer (Cervus elaphus) and 21 fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-eastern Poland. The samples were enriched in modified buffered peptone water. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were conducted to determine the virulence profile of stx1, stx2 and eae or aggR genes, to identify the subtypes of stx1 and stx2 genes, and to perform O and H serotyping. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were detected in the rectal swabs collected from 1/134 roe deer (0.75%) and 4/97 red deer (4.1%), and they were not detected in fallow deer (Dama dama). The remaining E....
Source: Food Microbiology - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Food Microbiol Source Type: research
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an important pathogen that causes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). After an EHEC outbreak involving uncooked beef, serving raw beef ...
Source: BMC Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
ConclusionsSTEC prevalence among young children with diarrhea in Romania was high and the risk of HUS is emerging. The establishment of a systematic laboratory-based surveillance program including identification of the circulating STEC strains coupled with epidemiological investigation of HUS patients is warranted to determine the source and mode of transmission of STEC and prevent of STEC-associated diarrhea and HUS.
Source: Gut Pathogens - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
An O104:H4 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain caused a large outbreak of bloody diarrhea and the hemolytic uremic syndrome in 2011. We previously developed an ampicillin (Amp)-treated C57BL/6 mouse model to measure morbidity (weight loss) and mortality of mice orally infected with the prototype Stx-EAEC strain C227-11. Here, we hypothesized that mice fed C227-11 cured of the pAA plasmid or deleted for individual genes on that plasmid would display reduced virulence compared to animals given the wild-type (wt) strain. C227-11 cured of the pAA plasmid or deleted for the known pAA-enc...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the regulation of the chromosomal subAB1 gene in laboratory E. coli strain DH5α and STEC O113:H21 strain TS18/08 using a luciferase reporter gene assay. Special emphasis was given on the role of the global regulatory protein genes hfq and hns on subAB1 promoter activity. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to analyze the expression of Shiga toxin 2a (Stx2a), SubAB1 and cytolethal distending toxin V (Cdt-V) genes in STEC strain TS18/08 and its isogenic hfq and hns deletion mutants. The deletion of hfq led to a significant increase of up to 2-fold in subAB1 expression, ...
Source: Applied and Environmental Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Environ Microbiol Source Type: research
More News: Canada Health | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) | Food and Drug Administration (FDA) | Fruit | Gastroenteritis | Health | Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) | Lettuce | Outbreaks | Sports Medicine | Urology & Nephrology | Vegetables