Surgical management of a patient with crouzon syndrome – case report

Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant inheritance that affects the FGFR2 receptors, manifesting as craniosynostosis of the coronal and sagittal sutures. This clinical case reports the treatment of 47-year-old patient C.A.P. whose main complaint was related to obstructive sleep apnea. He reported other syndromic characteristics such as phonetic difficulty, respiratory and masticatory pain, bilateral pain in the temporomandibular joint, and headaches. Clinically, maxillary hypoplasia was observed, associated with exophthalmos and mandibular prognathism.
Source: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research

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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Caring for the Ages - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: On My Mind Source Type: news
This article explains the high comorbidity of craniofacial pain (chronic face pain, temporomandibular disorders, and primary headaches) with obstructive sleep breathing disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It is recommended that physicians treating OSA should be aware of the concurrent chronic pain that affects the quality of sleep, and also dentists treating chronic pain be aware of a sleep breathing origin so that proper reciprocal referrals be made for optimal patient treatment outcome. Recent findings: These comorbid relationships are not limited to adults. The most recent literature demonstrates that children...
Source: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: SLEEP AND RESPIRATORY NEUROBIOLOGY: Edited by Lee K. Brown and Adrian J. Williams Source Type: research
If you are one of the estimated 40 million+ Americans who suffer each year from chronic sleep disorders or one of the additional 20 million who experience occasional sleeping problems, you know first hand how the problem can affect your quality of life. A sleep disorder can interfere with your work, your ability to drive and your participation in social activities. Did you know that many patients who suffer from sleep disorders are also dealing with a problem directly related to disorders in their temporomandibular joint (TMJ)? The TMJ is the joint that attaches your lower jaw, or mandible, to the temporal bone of your he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Alessandri-Bonetti G, Bortolotti F, Bartolucci ML, Marini I, D'Antò V, Michelotti A Abstract AIMS: To determine if pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masticatory and neck muscles change after the application of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in a sample of 27 OSA patients (24 males and 3 females; mean age ± standard deviation [SD]: 54.8 ± 11.8, mean apnea-hypopnea index ± SD: 23.5 ± 13.3) and 27 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Exclusion criteria were signs and symp...
Source: Journal of Orofacial Pain - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Oral Facial Pain Headache Source Type: research
More News: Craniofacial Surgery | ENT & OMF | Headache | Obstructive Sleep Apnea | Pain | Pain Management | Pathology | Radiology | Respiratory Medicine | Sleep Apnea | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Temporomandibular Disorders