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Cambridge Baby with 'rugby ball-shaped' head has surgery
Lucy Bowran-Pavey, now 17 months, from Cambridgeshire, was born with rare birth defect craniosynostosis. Doctors said she was at risk of brain damage if she wasn't operated on. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridgeshire baby with alien-shaped head has surgery
Lucy Bowran-Pavey, now 17 months, from Cambridgeshire, was born with rare birth defect craniosynostosis. Doctors said she was at risk of brain damage if she wasn't operated on. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taking my own advice: When the professional becomes a parent
As a disability expert, my whole career has been spent giving parents advice. I’ve given advice on parenting, doctors, child development, school and resources to support them. I was confident working with families and helping them navigate the often crazy and overwhelming world of special needs. But when I was 34 weeks pregnant with my own child, I found myself on the other side of the situation. My husband and I learned that our son, Jack, would be born with a cleft palate and micrognathia, or an undeveloped lower jaw. The extent of these facial differences wouldn’t be known until he was born. We met with doct...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jennifer Ryan Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip and palate Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Cory Resnick Pierre Robin sequence Source Type: news

Getting and giving support for cleft lip and palate
Jack Dolan came into the world with a laugh. His mother, Erin, was mid-chuckle during labor when he was born — “a really joyful entrance,” she says. Looking down at her new son, she and her husband, Jimmy, breathed sighs of relief. “We took one look at him and thought, ‘He’s beautiful,’” she remembers. “We knew then that everything was going to be okay.” It was a happy celebration after a pregnancy sometimes marked by stress and anxiety. During ultrasonography, Erin and Jimmy had learned that Jack would be born with a bilateral cleft lip and palate. Erin, a nurse ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip and palate Dr. John Mulliken Olivia Oppel Source Type: news

A happy return: Catching up with Eva
It’s about 2,400 miles from Salt Lake City to Boston. But it’s a distance Jennifer and Vincent Ramirez are more than happy to travel to get care for their daughter Eva. The family first traveled to Boston Children’s Hospital in January of 2016 for surgery to remove Eva’s encephalocele — a surgery her doctors in Utah had said wasn’t possible. This spring, the family was back in Boston for a follow-up visit with the surgeons who performed her surgery, Dr. Mark Proctor, neurosurgeon-in-chief, and Dr. John Meara, plastic-surgeon-in-chief. For this visit, Jennifer and Vincent had decided to b...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Craniofacial Program Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor encephalocele Source Type: news

What are Indications for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)?
DiscussionObstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is defined as a “disorder of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction and/or intermittent complete obstruction (obstructive apnea) that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and normal sleep patterns.” It is different than primary snoring which is snoring without apnea, sleep arousals, or problems with gas exchange. OSAS symptoms include snoring (often with snorts, gasps or pauses), disturbed sleep (often frequent arousals) and daytime neurobehavioral problems. Sleepiness during the day can occur but is less common in...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Mice headed for space to test bone-building drug developed at UCLA
What do space travel, rodents and a bone-building protein all have in common? A team of UCLA scientists is bringing these three elements together to test an experimental drug that could one day result in a treatment for osteoporosis, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide.The drug could also potentially help those with bone damage or loss, a condition that afflicts people with traumatic bone injury, such as injured military service members, as well as astronauts  who lose bone density while in space.Led by Dr. Chia Soo and Dr. Kang Ting, who met and married while working on this project, as well as Dr. B...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Paying it forward: Care for son ’s craniosynostosis spurs mom to run marathon
Will Flanigan can’t stop giggling. Whether he’s teasing his older sister, Spencer, or charming his way out of trouble with his parents, this toddler “is always cracking himself — and us — up,” says his mother, Caroline. “We call him Will the Thrill.” On April 17, 2017, Will brought his good humor from his home in Dallas to the Boston Marathon finish line, where he joined his family in cheering on Caroline as she ran. But this wasn’t just any race. Caroline was running with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Miles for Miracles team for a very special reason: A...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Boston Marathon Craniofacial Program craniosynostosis Dr. Mark Proctor Source Type: news

A new life for Lynkin after encephalocele surgery
When you meet Lynkin Bell, the first things you notice are her big personality and chubby cheeks. You might also see how she adores her brother Lukis and hamming it up for the camera. But you’d never guess that this playful 14-month-old from Texas wasn’t expected to survive, never mind talk, stand or play peekaboo like a pro. And yet, thanks to her parents’ faith and persistence — and surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital — Lynkin can do all those things, and lots more, with the gusto befitting any toddler her age. “It’s a miracle,” says Kaylen Gaston, Lynkin’s mo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Craniofacial Program Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor encephalocele Source Type: news

A Day to Remember That Every Child Deserves a Chance
Emina Cerimovic is a disability rights researcher at Human Rights Watch.By Emina ĆerimovićNEW YORK, Feb 27 2017 (IPS)The day I met Julija she was playing cheerfully with her baby sister on the floor inside their room in Kragujevac, a small town in southern Serbia. When she saw me – a stranger — on the doorstep, she smiled widely and stretched out her hands, offering a hug. As I held her, I could hear how difficult it was for her to breathe. I looked at her, she smiled and touched my face with her hands and only...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Emina Cerimovic Tags: Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Serbia Source Type: news

Efficacy of different methods to reduce pain during debonding of orthodontic brackets.
CONCLUSIONS:The stress relief method showed no difference when compared with the other groups. Finger pressure was more effective than the elastomeric wafer in the lower jaw. Higher pain levels were recorded for the anterior regions with the elastomeric wafer. Females and pain catastrophizers gave higher VAS scores. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 16, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Families with Apert syndrome find similarities, not differences
Madilynn and her father Rocky For some families in the waiting room on the day of the Apert syndrome clinic, it’s a reunion. For others, it’s a revelation. Coming to Boston Children’s Hospital from as far away as China, some have never met another child with Apert syndrome. Before long, parents and kids of all ages and ethnicities are taking group selfies as the younger children run around and play. “These kids have the brightest smiles, they’re very resilient,” says Tambra Milot, mother of 3-year-old Madilynn. Each year, the clinic sees about 50 children with Apert syndrome, a rare gene...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our Patients’ Stories apert syndrome Cleft and Craniofacial Center craniosynostosis Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery Dr. Amir Taghinia Dr. Brian Labow Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Richard Bruun sleep apnea Source Type: news

Ohio baby has life-saving operation to break his skull to correct the shape of his head
Nine-month-old Caleb Torres, from Ohio, was born with an elongated head. Doctors revealed he had craniosynostosis and that he needed surgery to reshape his head or risk permanent brain damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Measurement helps craniofacial surgeons better evaluate children with skull deformity
(University of Missouri-Columbia) A baby's skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Plates that fuse too early can cause cranial deformities that can lead to learning impairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Measurement helps craniofacial surgeons better evaluate children with skull deformity
A baby ’s skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Previous research has shown that approximately one in 2,000 babies have plates that fuse too early — a condition called craniosynostosis — causing cranial deformities that can lead to learning i mpairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when surgical intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Uganda: 33 Children Undergo Plastic Surgery in Kaberamaido
[Monitor] Kaberamaido -At least 33 children with craniofacial abnormities, including cleft lip and palate, have undergone plastic surgery in Kaberamaido hospital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 22, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

One mom ’s insights: Navigating care for children with behavior differences
Diba Jalalzadeh, now 12, paces energetically around the waiting room. She has been coming to Boston Children’s Hospital since she was a baby. She sees plastic surgeon Dr. John Mulliken for her craniofacial condition, known as Crouzon syndrome. But he’s just one of her many doctors. Diba is followed by Dr. Linda Dagi (Ophthalmology), Dr. Bonnie Padwa (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Dr. Mark Proctor (Neurosurgery), Dr. David Coulter (Neurology), Dr. Laurie Ohlms (Otolaryngology) Dr. John Emans (Orthopedic Surgery), Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan (Developmental Medicine), Dr. Dascha Weir (Gastroenterology and Nutrition...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 17, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Parenting autism Autism Spectrum Center child life Crouzon syndrome Dr. Bonnie Padwa Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan Dr. Dascha Weir Dr. David Coulter Dr. John Emans Dr. Laurie Ohlms Dr. Linda Dagi Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Roger Breitbart Source Type: news

What Every Parent Needs To Know About Their Kid's Respiratory Habits
Part of Your Smile, Your Health™ Series, a division of Sleep Fitness, LLC Co-authored by Keelyn Ross What are the benefits of nasal breathing? There is a right way to breathe and a wrong way to breathe. The right way is through the nose, the wrong way is through the mouth. Nasal breathing benefits the body on multiple levels because the nose is super equipped to process incoming air. The nose has a built-in humidifier and filtration system, so when air enters through the nasal passages, it's warmed and moistened. It is also equipped to sense and destroy harmful bacteria before it enters the body. This means ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kailyn ’s smiles, Kailyn’s strength
Photo credit: Samantha K Photography On April 1, 2012, my husband Kevin and I found out we were expecting our second baby. We were very surprised as our daughter Kendall was just seven months old at the time. At the same time, we were very excited we would have two kids so close in age. At our 20-week ultrasound, we had another surprise — this baby had a cleft lip. We were pretty upset when we left the ultrasound. We couldn’t stop asking, “Why us? What did we do wrong?” We were sent for a 3D ultrasound to confirm what we already knew. From there we were referred to the Cleft and Craniofacial Ce...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Michelle Riley Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip Dr. John Mulliken Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 21, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. FlexDex Surgical closes $5m Series B, preps launch of laparoscopic tools FlexDex Surgical said today that it raised a $5 million Series B round it plans to use to advance the laparoscopic surgery tools it’s developing.&nb...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson gets in on 3D printing with Materialise deal for titanium skull & face implants
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said this week that it inked a deal with 3D printing shop Materialise for titanium craniofacial implants customized to individual patients’ anatomies. Leuven, Belgium-based Materialise will print the Trumatch line of implants for J&J’s DePuy Synthes business, for treating patients with disorders of the face and skull. The companies have worked together on craniofacial technology  for 6 years, Johnson & Johnson said. “The Trumatch CMF solutions portfolio includes several advanced technologies for facial reconstruction, orthognathic surgery, ...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Contract Manufacturing Orthopedics Surgical 3D printing DePuy Synthes Johnson & Johnson Materialise Source Type: news

Printing your skull: How 3D printing helps surgeons plan complex encephalocele brain surgeries
At five months’ gestation, Bentley Yoder was given little chance to live. A routine 20-week “gender reveal” ultrasound showed that a large portion of his brain was growing outside of his skull, a malformation known as an encephalocele. But he was moving and kicking and had a strong heartbeat, so his parents, Sierra and Dustin, carried on with the pregnancy. Born through a normal vaginal delivery (the doctors felt that a C-section would interfere with Sierra’s grieving process), Bentley surprised everyone by thriving and meeting most of his baby milestones. But the large protuberance on his head was...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Blog Vector Blog Source Type: news

Jack’s journey managing Robin sequence
Jennifer and 8-week-old Jack Jennifer Ryan is a disability expert. She started her career doing home visits with drug-addicted and abused babies, then ran a center and started a program for kids with autism and now works in a collaborative elementary school. But nothing prepared this new mom for the challenges she would face with her own child. “It’s completely different when it’s your own,” she says now, after her son Jack was treated at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Cleft and Craniofacial Center for a group of birth defects known as Pierre Robin sequence or just Robin sequence. For...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft palate Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Cory Resnick Pierre Robin sequence Source Type: news

Jack ’s journey managing Robin sequence
Jennifer and 8-week-old Jack Jennifer Ryan is a disability expert. She started her career doing home visits with drug-addicted and abused babies, then ran a center and started a program for kids with autism and now works in a collaborative elementary school. But nothing prepared this new mom for the challenges she would face with her own child. “It’s completely different when it’s your own,” she says now, after her son Jack was treated at Boston Children’s Hospital’s Cleft and Craniofacial Center for a group of birth defects known as Pierre Robin sequence or just Robin sequence. For...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research and Innovation Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft palate Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Cory Resnick Pierre Robin sequence Source Type: news

NYU’s Bluestone Center Awarded $1.2M from NIH to Investigate Gene Delivery for the Treatment of Oral Cancer Pain
Proposed studies will test the effectiveness of a novel, non-viral gene delivery method developed by Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano in treating cancer painThe National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain.Quality of life for oral cancer patients can be dismal. “Most of my oral cancer patients have severe pain,” says Brian L. Schmidt, DDS, MD, PhD, professor in the D...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - July 6, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

NYU ’s Bluestone Center Awarded $1.2M from NIH to Investigate Gene Delivery for the Treatment of Oral Cancer Pain
Proposed studies will test the effectiveness of a novel, non-viral gene delivery method developed by Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano in treating cancer pain The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded Drs. Brian Schmidt and Seiichi Yamano a $1.2M (3-year) grant to test whether their non-viral gene delivery method can effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. Quality of life for oral cancer patients can be dismal. “Most of my oral cancer patients have severe pain,” says Brian L. Schmidt, DDS, MD, PhD, professor in ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - July 6, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

A second chance for Bentley and his encephalocele
Sierra Yoder was having a normal pregnancy, but the 20-week prenatal ultrasound seemed to tell another story. The Yoders learned that their child — a boy to be named Bentley — had something called an encephalocele. Brain tissue was bulging out of an abnormal opening in his skull, unprotected by bone. “They said he had zero chance of survival — ‘incompatible with life,’ they told us,” recalls Sierra. “I specifically remember asking is there any chance he could survive? They said no, that in the best-case scenario, he’s going to be a vegetable. They made it out like I was...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Susan Goobie encephalocele Simulation Program Source Type: news

A second chance for Bentley and his encephalocele
Sierra Yoder was having a normal pregnancy, but the 20-week prenatal ultrasound seemed to tell another story. The Yoders learned that their child — a boy to be named Bentley — had something called an encephalocele. Brain tissue was bulging out of an abnormal opening in his skull, unprotected by bone. “They said he had zero chance of survival — ‘incompatible with life,’ they told us,” recalls Sierra. “I specifically remember asking is there any chance he could survive? They said no, that in the best-case scenario, he’s going to be a vegetable. They made it out like I was...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Susan Goobie encephalocele Simulation Program Source Type: news

Paul Krebsbach named new dean of UCLA Dentistry
University of Michigan Dr. Paul Krebsbach Dr. Paul Krebsbach, one of the nation’s leading researchers in tissue engineering and stem cell biology and a respected academic leader, has been appointed dean of the UCLA School of Dentistry. Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Scott Waugh announced today that Krebsbach will become the eighth dean of UCLA Dentistry, effective June 30. He will succeed Dr. No-Hee Park, who has served as dean since 1998 and is returning to teaching and research. Krebsbach has been a member of the faculty at the University of Michigan since 1996. He is the Roy H. Roberts Professor of Dentist...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ultrasonic surgery reduces pain and swelling after chin surgery
(Wolters Kluwer Health) For patients undergoing plastic surgery of the chin (genioplasty), the use of ultrasonic 'piezosurgery' equipment reduces trauma, pain, and swelling, compared to traditional surgical drills, reports a study in the The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Stratification of risk to the surgical team in removal of small arms ammunition implanted in the craniofacial region: case report - Forbes JA, Laughlin I, Newberry S, Ryhn M, Pasley J, Newberry T.
In cases of penetrating injury with implantation of small arms ammunition, it can often be difficult to tell the difference between simple ballistics and ballistics associated with unexploded ordnances (UXOs). In the operative environment, where highly fla... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Protein combination improves bone regeneration, UCLA study shows
A UCLA research team has found a combination of proteins that could significantly improve clinical bone restoration. The findings may be a big step toward developing effective therapeutic treatments for bone skeletal defects, bone loss and osteoporosis. The study, led by Dr. Kang Ting, professor and chair of the section of orthodontics at the UCLA School of Dentistry; Dr. Chia Soo, professor of plastic surgery and vice chair for research at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA; and Dr. Aaron James, a fellow in surgical pathology, will appear as the lead article in the February print edition of the American Jour...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 29, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A fighting chance for Eva
Violet and Vincent with their new sister Early in 2015, Jennifer and Vincent Ramirez had everything they wanted — two healthy children: Violet, 5, and Vincent, 3, and they had just bought a new home in Salt Lake City. The couple decided to try for a third child. Jennifer learned she was pregnant in a few weeks. “Everything was going according to plan,” recalls Vincent. In July of 2015, the entire family packed into an exam room for Jennifer’s five-month ultrasound. “The doctor wasn’t talking much, and the ultrasound seemed to be taking longer than usual,” says Jennifer. After the u...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Craniofacial Program encephalocele John Meara Mark Proctor microcephaly Source Type: news

Formerly conjoined twins reunite with their hospital team
Maria de Jesus and Maria Teresa Alvarez, the formerly conjoined Guatemalan twins who were separated in 2002 at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA in a landmark 23-hour surgery that was followed around the world, returned to UCLA today to visit with pediatric patients and the medical staff who cared for them for many months. The girls, who were nicknamed the “two Marias” by hospital staff, are now 14 and live near each other in Southern California with two adoptive families. Maria de Jesus, now called Josie, spent the holidays back in 2002, in the hospital with her sister Maria Teresa, now known as Teresita. ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 15, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

FDA OKs StimRelieve chronic migraine trial
StimRelieve said today it won FDA investigational device exemption to launch a trial of its percutaneously implantable Halo CFNS device for treating chronic migraines. Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.-based StimRelieve said its Halo CFNS device, using wirelessly-powered, nanotech neurostimulators, is 95% smaller than other implantable treatment options. The wireless device, powered by an external transmitter in the ear, is implanted with a standard-gauge needle, the company said. “To date, treatments for chronic migraines have had limited and inconsistent results. Chronic migraine headache pain is a crippling condition...
Source: Mass Device - December 11, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Clinical Trials StimRelieve Source Type: news

Blanket forts, healthy hearts and life: What our families are thankful for
When parents and children first arrive at our front door — no matter why or from where they come — they forever become part of our extended family. On this Thanksgiving, just like the 47 million others who are traveling to see loved ones, we too packed up the car and drove to visit 11 of the families who have stayed with us at Boston Children’s over the years. We wanted to find out what they were most thankful for and what makes this season special to them. Thank you to the families of Ella S., Julian, Ella D., Addison, Callum, Nora, Avery, Jace, Molly, Charlotte, Murphy and Robbie for welcoming us i...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 26, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Thanksgving Source Type: news

Catching up with Violet: At home in Oregon
Early in 2015, Violet, an Oregon toddler with an impish grin and halo of dark curls, inched her way into hearts all over the world. Violet was born with a Tessier cleft — an extremely rare and serious craniofacial anomaly. It’s a highly complex condition requiring specialty care. Her parents found what their daughter needed at Boston Children’s Hospital. They traveled from Oregon to Boston, where a multidisciplinary team led by Dr. John Meara, Plastic Surgeon-in-Chief, and Dr. Mark Proctor, vice-chair of neurosurgery, undertook a life-changing transformation. The nine-hour surgery that changed Violet&rsqu...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 12, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories 3-D printing craniofacial anomaly Dr. John Meara Tessier cleft Source Type: news

Surgical treatment of upper and middle facial zone traumas in progress of concomitant traumatic craniofacial injuries - Lagvilava G, Gvenetadze Z, Toradze G, Devidze I, Gvenetadze G.
In 2012-2015, 207 patients with concomitant craniofacial injuries, who underwent surgical treatment, were observed; among them 176 were men and 31- women. Age of the patients ranged from 16 to 60 years. According to localization and severity of trauma and ... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - September 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

July highlights: Mother’s intuition, music therapy & more
Catch up on what you may have missed on Thriving last month. Our staff takes a look back at a few of this month’s favorite posts. A mother’s intuition—and a fall down the stairs—save a little girl’s life Liz Beaulieu is likely the only person in the world who can say she saved her child by falling down the stairs. Her daughter, Arielle, was just 4 days old. Liz was carrying her downstairs when she slipped. Not sure whether Arielle had hit her head, she whisked her to her local ER. “She seemed fine, and they said that she looked fine,” Liz says. Still concerned, though, Liz ke...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 4, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Boston Children's Hospital staff Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories Chiari Malformation concussion congenital heart defect Dr. Alex Taylor Dr. Ben Warf Dr. Bonnie Padwa Dr. Lawrence Karlin Dr. Michael O'brien Dr. Michael Scott Dr. Roger Nuss hemifacial microsomia Source Type: news

Kyle Cooper waits 18 years for oral surgery
Monday through Saturday, Kyle Cooper wakes up at 5:40 in the morning to get to his construction job by 7:00. On his only day off, he shoots trap at the local sportsman’s club with his grandfather. Things that would bother a typical teen—a long commute, arduous work, little time off for friends—barely faze Kyle. This 18-year-old has the quiet confidence and patience of someone twice his age. Kyle’s demeanor may be due in part to having had to wait a lifetime for something he wanted so badly. He was born with hemifacial microsomia (HFM), a craniofacial anomaly that resulted in the left side of this fa...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 27, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories Bonnie Padwa Craniofacial Anomalies Program plastic and oral surgery department Source Type: news

Life with ‘the little warrior’ 19 months after encephalocele surgery
Photo courtesy of Lorrin Sell Nearly every morning in the quiet, early light, 19-month-old Owen Sheridan awakens not with a cry but with a steady, strong-willed yell, just to tell his parents he’s ready to begin the day. “We will change his diaper and bring him into bed with us,” says Owen’s mom Jen Sheridan. “He will babble happily. And when he smiles, it is the sweetest thing.” For the Sheridans, the smile is just one of the many miracles since Owen, the little warrior as they call him, returned home from Boston Children’s Hospital on Jan. 11, 2014. Born with a rare growth called...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 14, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

UCLA study reveals bone-building protein’s impact on bone stem cells
A new study by UCLA researchers shows that administering the protein NELL-1 intravenously stimulates significant bone formation through the regenerative ability of stem cells. These preclinical results could one day have an impact on the development of a treatment for osteoporosis, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide, as well as potentially help those with traumatic bone injuries, such as members of the military or even astronauts who lose bone density while in space. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, was led by co-senior authors Dr. Kang Ting, chair of orthodontics and the divisio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 29, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What Life Is Like With A Disfigured Face
(Photo: © Anthony Gerace) In a world obsessed with beauty, living with a facial disfigurement can be hard. Neil Steinberg explores the past and present to find out what it’s like to look different.“Take your ear off for me, please,” Rosie Seelaus says to Randy James, who is sitting on a black exam chair in a special room designed for viewing colors in the Craniofacial Center on the Near West Side of Chicago.He reaches up and detaches his right ear, which she created for him out of silicone seven years before. The ear is shabby, stained from skin oil and mottled by daily use. Viewed under various lig...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 26, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Doctors perform historic skull-and-scalp transplant surgery
(Reuters) — A man whose cancer left him with severe damage to the top of the head received what his doctors in Houston describe as the 1st skull-and-scalp transplant, the MD Anderson Cancer Center said yesterday. James Boysen, a 55-year-old software developer from Austin, received the craniofacial tissue transplant at the same time as a kidney and pancreas transplant at Houston Methodist Hospital May 22 in surgeries that lasted nearly a day, it said. “For this patient, it means a new lease on life,” said Dr. Jesse Selber, a reconstructive plastic surgeon who was the co-leader of the team that performed th...
Source: Mass Device - June 5, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Surgical Organ Transplant Source Type: news

Tranexamic Acid Reduces Blood Loss in Craniofacial SurgeryTranexamic Acid Reduces Blood Loss in Craniofacial Surgery
Following implementation of a tranexamic acid protocol, postoperative transfusions dropped to zero for craniosynostosis surgery in infants at one center. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Craniosynostosis: Heading in the right direction
Credit: Rachel Larson Photography When Ella Dorsey was born, her father Paul noticed something different about the shape of her skull. Her mother Cynthia, tired after the birth, assumed Ella’s head had gotten a little misshapen going through the birth canal, not an unusual thing to happen. But just before they were discharged, Cynthia noticed that a pediatrician she hadn’t yet met was paying particular attention to Ella’s head. “She was holding the baby, touching her head, constantly going over the baby’s skull,” she remembers. “I finally said to her, ‘Is the baby OK?’&...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 21, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories craniosynostosis neurosurgery Source Type: news

Here’s Why You Have a Chin
Nature is nothing if not parsimonious, especially when it comes to the human body. There’s a reason we don’t have webbed feet or nut-cracking beaks like other species, and that’s because we don’t need them. The system isn’t perfect, of course. If you ever wind up having painful abdominal surgery, odds are pretty fair that it will be your good-for-nothing appendix that’s to blame. And wisdom teeth seem a lot less wise when you consider how often they fall down on the job and need to get yanked. As it turns out, the same why-bother pointlessness is true of what you might consider one of yo...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 15, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized aesthetics anthropology Biology chin craniofacial structure early humans Face mating primitive humans Source Type: news

How craniosynostosis turned a Costa Rican family into New England Patriots fans
Like many new mothers, Lyana Guzman Gutierrez was exhausted but overjoyed after giving birth to a healthy and beautiful baby boy. But within two weeks, Lyana, who lived near San Jose, Costa Rica, noticed that Marcel’s eyes and other facial features were not aligned. Lyana’s mother urged her to bring Marcel to the pediatrician, who referred her to a local radiologist. The specialist diagnosed Marcel with craniosynostosis, a condition in which the fibrous joints or sutures between the plates of the skull fuse too early during a child’s development. This resulted in asymmetry of Marcel’s head which, if...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 18, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Our patients’ stories craniosynostosis Mark Proctor neurology Source Type: news

Violet’s story: The next chapter
Just shy of her second birthday, Violet is ready to move on to the next chapter of her life. Her face has inspired hundreds of thousands of Facebook likes and shares. The New York Times feature about her has captivated the world. The video series about her medical journey has gone viral. But these images and words tell a tiny part of Violet’s story. Behind the dramatic medical case is a toddler with an impish grin, delightful belly laugh and (mostly) quiet determination. Before Violet was born, doctors told her parents, Alicia and Matt, that their twin daughters had a rare craniofacial defect called an encephalocele....
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 30, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Our patients’ stories Source Type: news