Hydrogel could be step forward in therapies to generate bones in head and neck
A team of UCLA School of Dentistry researchers has developed the first adhesive hydrogel specifically to regenerate bone and tissue defects following head and neck surgeries. Their invention was inspired in part by the way that marine mussels can stick to wet surfaces.Their research is published online in the journal Science Translational Medicine.Over the past few years, surgeons and clinicians have begun using hydrogels to administer therapeutic drugs and stem cells to help regenerate lost tissues and bone defects. This approach has advantages over the previous standard treatment, bone grafts, which can lead to infl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Can ultrasound, 3D printing deepen maternal-fetal bonds?
When a pregnant woman sees her fetus on imaging scans, it can help strengthen...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AR, 3D printing make waves in cardiac care Top 5 clinical applications of pediatric 3D printing How can 3D printing improve kidney cancer surgery? 3D MRI captures changes to fetal head during birth 3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 18, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Behavioral sciences in the promotion of oral health
International& American Associations for Dental Research Alexandria, VA, USA - 2019 marks the Centennial of theJournal of Dental Research (JDR). Over the last century theJDR has been dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease. To celebrate, theJDR is featuring a yearlong, commemorative article and podcast series that highlights topics that have transformed dental, oral and craniofacial research over the past 100 years. The importance and value of behavioral sciences in dentistry has long bee...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - December 5, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Heartwarming moment a toddler born with a skull too small for his brain walks for the first time
Branson Figueroa, two, from Nottingham, New Hampshire, was born with a skull defect called craniosynostosis. He had a seven-hour surgery to correct the condition last week. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New hydrogels show promise in treating bone defects
Bioengineers and dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration compared to hydrogels that are currently available. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing. Current experimental applications using hydrogels and stem cells introduced into the body or expensive biological agents can come with negative side effects.The findings, published online in the journal Nature Communications, suggest that in the near future the...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 28, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

New hydrogels show promise in treating bone defects
Bioengineers and dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration compared to hydrogels that are currently available. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing. Current experimental applications using hydrogels and stem cells introduced into the body or expensive biological agents can come with negative side effects.The  findings, published online in the journal Nature Communications, suggest that in the near future th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Top 5 clinical applications of pediatric 3D printing
What are the most common clinical applications for 3D-printed models created...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: How can 3D printing improve kidney cancer surgery? SIIM: New reimbursement codes set to advance 3D printing 3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults 3D printing helps separate rare case of conjoined twins 3D printing gives pediatric heart surgery a boost (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 31, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study affirms accuracy of 3D-printed anatomical models
Researchers from Chile have found that there is a high correlation between...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AR, 3D printing aid presurgical planning for kidney cancer 3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults 3D printing helps separate rare case of conjoined twins AR, 3D printing make headway in patient education 3D-printed lungs improve patient understanding of surgery (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 23, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Conjoined Twin Girls Successfully Separated After 50 Hours of Operations
Surgeons announced on Monday that they have separated conjoined twin sisters after multiple surgeries that took more than 50 hours to complete. Two-year-old Safa and Marwa Ullah underwent three surgeries carried out between October 2018 and February this year at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, according to the Guardian. The sisters, who hail from Charsadda in Pakistan, were born with their skulls and blood vessels joined together. “We are extremely excited about the future,” Zainab Bibi, the girl’s mother, said according to the Guardian. Their father died of a heart attack before they were born. ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime overnight Source Type: news

New alternate cell growth pathway could lead to better treatments for metastatic cancers
This study found that this resistance is correlated to higher mEAK-7 expression in cancer cells.”Additional study authors are Fatima Haidar, Alexandra Fox, Connor Ray and Daniela Mendon ça, all from the University of Michigan.The study was supported in part by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the Stuart and Barbara Padnos Research Award from the Rogel Cancer Center at the University of Michigan. The authors have no competing interests to declare. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What Causes Temporomandibular Joint Problems?
Discussion The mandible normally grows in a symmetric downward and forward movement relative to the skull base. The condyle is the primary growth center. “The mandible is unique in that its 2 joints and growth centers function together as a single unit.” It is the last bone in the body to reach skeletal maturity. The mandible and its growth are important for maxillary growth and therefore many problems that affect the mandible affect the facial and skulls structures as well. These growth problems can be relatively insidious and therefore may need monitoring over longer periods of time such as patients with unde...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 27, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

ARRS: Radiologists foresee bright future for 3D printing
HONOLULU - What are the predominant applications of 3D printing in healthcare,...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AR, 3D printing aid presurgical planning for kidney cancer 3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults 3D printing gives pediatric heart surgery a boost 3D-printed lungs improve patient understanding of surgery 3D head models reduce workload for brain radiotherapy (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 6, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

AR, 3D printing aid presurgical planning for kidney cancer
Augmented reality (AR) and 3D printing provided better visualization of intricate...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults AR aids image-guided spinal procedures on live patients AR, 3D printing make headway in patient education 3D printing gives pediatric heart surgery a boost Augmented reality heightens accuracy of brain procedure (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 26, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

3D-printed craniofacial models support family consults
Researchers from Saudi Arabia have created 3D-printed models based on the CT...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D printing reduces liver transplant costs, surgery time 3D printing yields custom-fit glasses for kids 3D printing helps separate rare case of conjoined twins 3D printing gives pediatric heart surgery a boost 3D-printed lungs improve patient understanding of surgery (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Is an R & amp;D Race Driving the Surgical Robotics Market?
Robotic-assisted surgery has emerged with an attempt to overcome the limitations of traditional minimally invasive surgical procedures. With increasing competition, the way to gain market share in this quickly growing market is with innovative technology. This means R&D is at the forefront of this market, driving adoption, expanding applications, and leading to a market that will more than double in size by 2025. It’s been a steady trajectory since the first medical robot, Arthrobot, was developed in Canada in 1983 for use during orthopedic procedures1. Then, the first robotic-assisted procedure, neur...
Source: MDDI - April 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Yulia Sorokina and Jeff Wong Tags: R & D Orthopedics Source Type: news

XSurgical Touts MTEC Membership and Future in Surgical Robotics
XSurgical, a firm that is developing a remote-controlled surgical robot technology, has been accepted for membership into the Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium (MTEC). MTEC operates as a biomedical technology consortium that collaborates with multiple government agencies to foster integrated research partnerships in an effort to speed up the development of medical technology solutions for military, veterans, and the civilian population. “The consortium will allow us to collaborate with biomedical technology colleagues at different companies, as well as with multiple government agencies ...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Business Source Type: news

Dog-bite-related craniofacial fractures among pediatric patients: a case series and review of literature - Saadi R, Oberman BS, Lighthall JG.
Dog bites in the pediatric population commonly cause injuries to the head and can be associated with fractures, often leading to prolonged hospital stays, multiple surgical interventions, and long-term complications. Our goal was to evaluate our experience... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

CRISPR gene editing will find applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery
(Wolters Kluwer Health) The CRISPR genome editing technique promises to be a 'transformative leap' in genetic engineering and therapy, affecting almost every area of medicine. That includes plastic surgery, with potential advances ranging from prevention of craniofacial malformations, to therapeutic skin grafts, to new types of rejection-free transplants, according to a paper in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ® , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tranexamic Acid Dosing Clarified for Pediatric Skull Surgery
(MedPage Today) -- Low loading dose on par for blood loss in craniosynostosis surgery (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - September 18, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Surgical treatment of anterior sinus wall fracture due to sports accident - Hadad H, Cervantes LCC, Silva RBPD, Junger B, Gon çalves PZ, Fabris ALDS, Júnior IRG.
Frontal bone fractures represent a low percentage of craniofacial fractures. However, a systematic approach and a correct diagnosis are essential for successful treatment and maintenance of physiology of the frontal sinus and late complications. The purpos... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Pioneering Plastic Surgeon in Transgender Care Dies at 96 Pioneering Plastic Surgeon in Transgender Care Dies at 96
Milton Edgerton helped found the first academic center for sex affirmation surgeries in the United States. He also performed groundbreaking craniofacial surgeries in children.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine News Source Type: news

Face transplantation -- An established option to improve quality of life in patients with severe facial trauma
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Thirteen years after the first successful face transplant, US trauma surgeons should be aware of the current role of facial transplantation for patients with severe facial disfigurement -- including evidence that the final appearance and functioning are superior to that provided by conventional reconstructive surgery. That's the message of a special update on 'Face Transplantation Today' in the June issue of The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, edited by Mutaz B. Habal, M.D., and published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toddler Thrives after Endoscopic Craniosynostosis Surgery
Treatment TermsPediatric Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryPediatric Neurology Sub-Title Minimally Invasive Surgery for Abnormal Head Shape Author Erin Hull Overview When an observant pediatrician told April Longmire and Mike Stone of Louisburg, NC that there were some irregularities in their infant ’s skull, they were instantly worried. Today, their toddler is happy and healthy following minimally invasive craniosynostosis surgery performed by Duke pediatric neurosurgeon Carrie Muh, MD. Preview Image Content Blocks ContentYou never want to have anyone say anything is wrong with your child, ” April exp...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - March 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: efh7 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Virtual Surgical Planning: The Pearls and Pitfalls Virtual Surgical Planning: The Pearls and Pitfalls
A new study examines the benefits and drawbacks of virtual surgical planning in craniofacial surgery.Plastic Reconstructive Surgery-Global Open (PRS Global Open) (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Neurosurgical considerations in craniofacial trauma - Oxford RG, Chesnut RM.
This article dis... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Children with craniofacial defects face most difficult social pressures in elementary school
UCLA HealthDr. Justine LeeFINDINGSUCLA researchers  found that elementary school children with craniofacial anomalies show the highest levels of anxiety, depression and difficulties in peer interactions when compared to youths with craniofacial defects in middle and high schools.The findings suggest that keeping a close watch for these signs and educating the child ’s peers about their condition may be necessary for this age group.BACKGROUNDChildren born with congenital craniofacial anomalies, such as cleft lip and cleft palate, may have difficulty socializing with their peers and others and may face bullyi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tiny diamonds could become best friends to youths with cleft palates
This study showed that our method has a contained, targeted and sustained effect, so we’re very excited about it,” Hong said.Previous experiments showed nanodiamonds to be safe within the body and to be excreted normally. Similarly, earlier work demonstrated that enzymes break down hydrogel.The researchers plan to continue laboratory studies and hope to bring their treatment to clinical trials. Their approach has implications for treating other craniofacial conditions and sleep apnea, as well as healing wounds and bone injuries.Other authors of the study were Dong-Keun Lee, Lawrence Lin, Hsin Chuan Pan, Deborah...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cambridge Baby with 'rugby ball-shaped' head has surgery
Lucy Bowran-Pavey, now 17 months, from Cambridgeshire, was born with rare birth defect craniosynostosis. Doctors said she was at risk of brain damage if she wasn't operated on. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cambridgeshire baby with alien-shaped head has surgery
Lucy Bowran-Pavey, now 17 months, from Cambridgeshire, was born with rare birth defect craniosynostosis. Doctors said she was at risk of brain damage if she wasn't operated on. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taking my own advice: When the professional becomes a parent
As a disability expert, my whole career has been spent giving parents advice. I’ve given advice on parenting, doctors, child development, school and resources to support them. I was confident working with families and helping them navigate the often crazy and overwhelming world of special needs. But when I was 34 weeks pregnant with my own child, I found myself on the other side of the situation. My husband and I learned that our son, Jack, would be born with a cleft palate and micrognathia, or an undeveloped lower jaw. The extent of these facial differences wouldn’t be known until he was born. We met with doct...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jennifer Ryan Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip and palate Dr. Carolyn Rogers Dr. Cory Resnick Pierre Robin sequence Source Type: news

Getting and giving support for cleft lip and palate
Jack Dolan came into the world with a laugh. His mother, Erin, was mid-chuckle during labor when he was born — “a really joyful entrance,” she says. Looking down at her new son, she and her husband, Jimmy, breathed sighs of relief. “We took one look at him and thought, ‘He’s beautiful,’” she remembers. “We knew then that everything was going to be okay.” It was a happy celebration after a pregnancy sometimes marked by stress and anxiety. During ultrasonography, Erin and Jimmy had learned that Jack would be born with a bilateral cleft lip and palate. Erin, a nurse ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip and palate Dr. John Mulliken Olivia Oppel Source Type: news

A happy return: Catching up with Eva
It’s about 2,400 miles from Salt Lake City to Boston. But it’s a distance Jennifer and Vincent Ramirez are more than happy to travel to get care for their daughter Eva. The family first traveled to Boston Children’s Hospital in January of 2016 for surgery to remove Eva’s encephalocele — a surgery her doctors in Utah had said wasn’t possible. This spring, the family was back in Boston for a follow-up visit with the surgeons who performed her surgery, Dr. Mark Proctor, neurosurgeon-in-chief, and Dr. John Meara, plastic-surgeon-in-chief. For this visit, Jennifer and Vincent had decided to b...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Craniofacial Program Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor encephalocele Source Type: news

What are Indications for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)?
DiscussionObstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is defined as a “disorder of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction and/or intermittent complete obstruction (obstructive apnea) that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and normal sleep patterns.” It is different than primary snoring which is snoring without apnea, sleep arousals, or problems with gas exchange. OSAS symptoms include snoring (often with snorts, gasps or pauses), disturbed sleep (often frequent arousals) and daytime neurobehavioral problems. Sleepiness during the day can occur but is less common in...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Mice headed for space to test bone-building drug developed at UCLA
What do space travel, rodents and a bone-building protein all have in common? A team of UCLA scientists is bringing these three elements together to test an experimental drug that could one day result in a treatment for osteoporosis, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide.The drug could also potentially help those with bone damage or loss, a condition that afflicts people with traumatic bone injury, such as injured military service members, as well as astronauts  who lose bone density while in space.Led by Dr. Chia Soo and Dr. Kang Ting, who met and married while working on this project, as well as Dr. B...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Paying it forward: Care for son ’s craniosynostosis spurs mom to run marathon
Will Flanigan can’t stop giggling. Whether he’s teasing his older sister, Spencer, or charming his way out of trouble with his parents, this toddler “is always cracking himself — and us — up,” says his mother, Caroline. “We call him Will the Thrill.” On April 17, 2017, Will brought his good humor from his home in Dallas to the Boston Marathon finish line, where he joined his family in cheering on Caroline as she ran. But this wasn’t just any race. Caroline was running with Boston Children’s Hospital’s Miles for Miracles team for a very special reason: A...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Boston Marathon Craniofacial Program craniosynostosis Dr. Mark Proctor Source Type: news

A new life for Lynkin after encephalocele surgery
When you meet Lynkin Bell, the first things you notice are her big personality and chubby cheeks. You might also see how she adores her brother Lukis and hamming it up for the camera. But you’d never guess that this playful 14-month-old from Texas wasn’t expected to survive, never mind talk, stand or play peekaboo like a pro. And yet, thanks to her parents’ faith and persistence — and surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital — Lynkin can do all those things, and lots more, with the gusto befitting any toddler her age. “It’s a miracle,” says Kaylen Gaston, Lynkin’s mo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Craniofacial Program Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor encephalocele Source Type: news

A Day to Remember That Every Child Deserves a Chance
Emina Cerimovic is a disability rights researcher at Human Rights Watch.By Emina ĆerimovićNEW YORK, Feb 27 2017 (IPS)The day I met Julija she was playing cheerfully with her baby sister on the floor inside their room in Kragujevac, a small town in southern Serbia. When she saw me – a stranger — on the doorstep, she smiled widely and stretched out her hands, offering a hug. As I held her, I could hear how difficult it was for her to breathe. I looked at her, she smiled and touched my face with her hands and only...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Emina Cerimovic Tags: Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Serbia Source Type: news

Efficacy of different methods to reduce pain during debonding of orthodontic brackets.
CONCLUSIONS:The stress relief method showed no difference when compared with the other groups. Finger pressure was more effective than the elastomeric wafer in the lower jaw. Higher pain levels were recorded for the anterior regions with the elastomeric wafer. Females and pain catastrophizers gave higher VAS scores. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 16, 2016 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Families with Apert syndrome find similarities, not differences
Madilynn and her father Rocky For some families in the waiting room on the day of the Apert syndrome clinic, it’s a reunion. For others, it’s a revelation. Coming to Boston Children’s Hospital from as far away as China, some have never met another child with Apert syndrome. Before long, parents and kids of all ages and ethnicities are taking group selfies as the younger children run around and play. “These kids have the brightest smiles, they’re very resilient,” says Tambra Milot, mother of 3-year-old Madilynn. Each year, the clinic sees about 50 children with Apert syndrome, a rare gene...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Our Patients’ Stories apert syndrome Cleft and Craniofacial Center craniosynostosis Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery Dr. Amir Taghinia Dr. Brian Labow Dr. John Meara Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Richard Bruun sleep apnea Source Type: news

Ohio baby has life-saving operation to break his skull to correct the shape of his head
Nine-month-old Caleb Torres, from Ohio, was born with an elongated head. Doctors revealed he had craniosynostosis and that he needed surgery to reshape his head or risk permanent brain damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Measurement helps craniofacial surgeons better evaluate children with skull deformity
(University of Missouri-Columbia) A baby's skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Plates that fuse too early can cause cranial deformities that can lead to learning impairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Measurement helps craniofacial surgeons better evaluate children with skull deformity
A baby ’s skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Previous research has shown that approximately one in 2,000 babies have plates that fuse too early — a condition called craniosynostosis — causing cranial deformities that can lead to learning i mpairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when surgical intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Uganda: 33 Children Undergo Plastic Surgery in Kaberamaido
[Monitor] Kaberamaido -At least 33 children with craniofacial abnormities, including cleft lip and palate, have undergone plastic surgery in Kaberamaido hospital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 22, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

One mom ’s insights: Navigating care for children with behavior differences
Diba Jalalzadeh, now 12, paces energetically around the waiting room. She has been coming to Boston Children’s Hospital since she was a baby. She sees plastic surgeon Dr. John Mulliken for her craniofacial condition, known as Crouzon syndrome. But he’s just one of her many doctors. Diba is followed by Dr. Linda Dagi (Ophthalmology), Dr. Bonnie Padwa (Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery), Dr. Mark Proctor (Neurosurgery), Dr. David Coulter (Neurology), Dr. Laurie Ohlms (Otolaryngology) Dr. John Emans (Orthopedic Surgery), Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan (Developmental Medicine), Dr. Dascha Weir (Gastroenterology and Nutrition...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 17, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Parenting autism Autism Spectrum Center child life Crouzon syndrome Dr. Bonnie Padwa Dr. Carolyn Bridgemohan Dr. Dascha Weir Dr. David Coulter Dr. John Emans Dr. Laurie Ohlms Dr. Linda Dagi Dr. Mark Proctor Dr. Roger Breitbart Source Type: news

What Every Parent Needs To Know About Their Kid's Respiratory Habits
Part of Your Smile, Your Health™ Series, a division of Sleep Fitness, LLC Co-authored by Keelyn Ross What are the benefits of nasal breathing? There is a right way to breathe and a wrong way to breathe. The right way is through the nose, the wrong way is through the mouth. Nasal breathing benefits the body on multiple levels because the nose is super equipped to process incoming air. The nose has a built-in humidifier and filtration system, so when air enters through the nasal passages, it's warmed and moistened. It is also equipped to sense and destroy harmful bacteria before it enters the body. This means ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kailyn ’s smiles, Kailyn’s strength
Photo credit: Samantha K Photography On April 1, 2012, my husband Kevin and I found out we were expecting our second baby. We were very surprised as our daughter Kendall was just seven months old at the time. At the same time, we were very excited we would have two kids so close in age. At our 20-week ultrasound, we had another surprise — this baby had a cleft lip. We were pretty upset when we left the ultrasound. We couldn’t stop asking, “Why us? What did we do wrong?” We were sent for a 3D ultrasound to confirm what we already knew. From there we were referred to the Cleft and Craniofacial Ce...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - July 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Michelle Riley Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cleft and Craniofacial Center cleft lip Dr. John Mulliken Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 21, 2016
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. FlexDex Surgical closes $5m Series B, preps launch of laparoscopic tools FlexDex Surgical said today that it raised a $5 million Series B round it plans to use to advance the laparoscopic surgery tools it’s developing.&nb...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson gets in on 3D printing with Materialise deal for titanium skull & face implants
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said this week that it inked a deal with 3D printing shop Materialise for titanium craniofacial implants customized to individual patients’ anatomies. Leuven, Belgium-based Materialise will print the Trumatch line of implants for J&J’s DePuy Synthes business, for treating patients with disorders of the face and skull. The companies have worked together on craniofacial technology  for 6 years, Johnson & Johnson said. “The Trumatch CMF solutions portfolio includes several advanced technologies for facial reconstruction, orthognathic surgery, ...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Contract Manufacturing Orthopedics Surgical 3D printing DePuy Synthes Johnson & Johnson Materialise Source Type: news