Co-addiction of meth and opioids hinders treatment

(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment found that methamphetamine use was associated with more than twice the risk for dropping out of treatment for opioid-use disorder.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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For those with issues of substance abuse, or those in recovery, the COVID-19 pandemic is an added stress to an already heavy burden.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Montreal Source Type: news
Apr 28, 2020. . Sponsored by Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Source: Rural events via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: events
Apr 21, 2020. . Sponsored by Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Source: Rural events via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: events
Apr 14, 2020. . Sponsored by Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Source: Rural events via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: events
Apr 7, 2020. . Sponsored by Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
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Apr 29, 2020. . Sponsored by Addiction Technology Transfer Center Network, Center for Excellence on Protected Health Information (CoE-PHI), Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies (CASAT), National Consortium of Telehealth Resource Centers
Source: Rural events via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: events
WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2020 -- The social distancing and isolation of the coronavirus pandemic may put people struggling with addiction at risk for relapse, an expert says. Feeling stressed, isolated and scared may drive them back to substance abuse,...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs
While some people who’ve become addicted to alcohol and drugs have to hit rock bottom before they’re ready to accept treatment, most realize or can be convinced of the need to get professional help long before such a calamitous event. As for the timing, knowing when you are ready for treatment, it’s different for everyone. It may help to know some of the common signs you’re ready to take the crucial next step.  You’ve Had Enough — And So Has Everyone Else The list of addictive behaviors is long and varied, including problem drinking and alcohol abuse that descends into alcohol use d...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism Habits Substance Abuse Source Type: news
Patterns generally involve repetitive action, a task or behavior engaged in frequently, often without giving it much thought. Much daily behavior is fairly automatic, an activity done so many times that it feels comfortable and there’s no inherent harm in it. Or, it’s a behavior that we’re reluctant to change because of a reward associated with it. Toxic behavioral patterns are also often automatic, don’t necessarily present themselves as inherently harmful, and they’re more likely to continue due to the associated reward.  Some patterns have caused trouble in the past, are currently cont...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alcoholism Habits Self-Help Substance Abuse alcholism Habit Change Personal Growth Source Type: blogs
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