Do vestibular loss patients who complain of subjective cognitive impairments actually have objective cognitive impairments? An exploratory study

DiscussionThese preliminary results suggest that even if patients believe that they have reduced cognition caused by their vestibular deficits, it remains challenging to demonstrate the effects using simple (standard) objective cognitive measures. We discuss the mismatch in results in terms of cognitive specificity, complexity and compensation. We propose that the objective measures may more likely show effects if combined with a dual task, or by performing complex imagery tasks, adding strain to cognitive resources.
Source: Neurophysiologie Clinique - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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Conclusions Tertiary patients with vertigo and dizziness report negative illness perceptions and cognitive and behavioral responses to symptoms that are associated with self-reported handicap over time. Future studies are needed to investigate whether targeting these factors alongside traditional treatment approaches improves handicap in patients with chronic dizziness.
Source: Psychosomatic Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
ConclusionsTherapeutic principles comprise cognitive –behavioral therapy, vestibular rehabilitation exercises, and serotonergic medication. However, large‐scale, randomized, controlled trials are still missing. Follow‐up observations after multimodal interdisciplinary therapy reveal an improvement in symptoms in most patients with chronic dizzin ess. The study was not designed to detect diagnosis‐specific effects, but patients with PPPD and patients with other vestibular disorders benefit from multimodal therapies.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusion Patients with PPPD may be more attuned to spatial elements than to the content of emotionally charged visual stimuli. [...] Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, BrazilArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  open access Full text
Source: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
TITUSVILLE, N.J. – (August 3, 2020) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for SPRAVATO® (esketamine) CIII nasal spray, taken with an oral antidepressant, to treat depressive symptoms in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) with acute suicidal ideation orbehavior.1 SPRAVATO® is the first and only approved medicine that has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms within 24 hours,1 providing a new option for significant symptom relief until a longer-ter...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
Previous studies have shown that vestibular migraine (VM) is a cerebral disease with recurrent vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) is an effective type of physical therapy for minimizing vestibular symptoms, as it improves vestibular compensation in patients with VM. Currently, the cerebral regions that are associated with the pathogenesis of VM are largely unknown. To further understand the underlying mechanisms of VM, we performed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after 1 month of VR in 14 patients with VM. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the 36-Item Short-Form Health Surve...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
  At the thought of losing a job or missing a mortgage payment, Gabe is an anxious discombobulated mess, while Lisa is cool as a cucumber. In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa ponder: Why do people have such vastly different ways of reacting to the world? They also discuss — with the special flare that only a divorced couple has — the good old days when Gabe would have full-blown panic attacks and Lisa had to get them through it. How did they handle these scary moments? Is it ever OK to feel anger toward the panicky person? And what if the panicky person accidentally causes harm — sh...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
AbstractHistorical descriptions of fear at heights date back to Chinese and Roman antiquity. Current definitions distinguish between three different states of responses to height exposure: a physiological height imbalance that results from an impaired visual control of balance, a more or less distressing visual height intolerance, and acrophobia at the severest end of the spectrum. Epidemiological studies revealed a lifetime prevalence of visual height intolerance including acrophobia in 28% of adults (32% in women; 25% in men) and 34% among prepubertal children aged 8 –10 years without gender preponderance. Vis...
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Some comorbidities were present in both the AD and control groups, while others were found in the AD group and not in the control group, and vice versa.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: A standard treatment paradigm is lacking in Susac's syndrome as randomized controlled trials do not exist. There are no definitive scores to predict its outcome, and early diagnosis is important as the organs involved can easily become irreversibly damaged. Thus, patients with Susac's syndrome must be treated promptly and aggressively. Our report highlights the possibility of positive long-term prognosis with an early use of rituximab. However, a systematic therapeutic approach on the basis of controlled trials is mandatory to develop a consensus. PMID: 32380850 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: European Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Eur J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
Discussion Fragile X syndrome (FXS) was first clinically described in 1943 by Martin-Bell and in 1969 Lubs found a fragility at the terminal end of the X chromosome. In 1991, three different research groups independently cloned the mutation for the FMR1 gene (Fragile X mental retardation type 1) which has a CGG triplet expansion. The FMR1 gene codes for the FMR protein which is a major regulator of synaptic plasticity and is expressed in the brain and spermatogonia mainly but many other tissues during fetal and early neonatal development. The number of triplets and methylation correlates with clinical expression (increased...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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