Pisum sativum vs Glycine max, a comparative review of nutritional, physicochemical, and sensory properties for food uses

Publication date: Available online 30 November 2019Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Estelle Fischer, Rémy Cachon, Nathalie CayotAbstractBackground; Current issues surrounding meat consumption and changes in eating habits have motivated the development of meat substitutes. Vegetable proteins, especially legume proteins, are of interest. Soybean is the most widely used legume crop for food, but due to some negative aspects, it may be relevant to develop soybean substitutes.Scope and approach; Pea is a possible alternative to soybean and the latter was thus compared with pea to determine if pea would be a good substitute. This review provides a brief insight into the similarities and differences between soybean and pea regarding composition and nutrition as well as physicochemical and sensory aspects impacting their food uses.Key findings and conclusions; As pea is less allergenic than soybean but has similar nutritional and functional properties, it could be a great alternative to soybean. Nevertheless, some particularities of the pea composition can lead to a stronger “beany” off-flavor and so a less acceptable product. In addition, the isoenzymes involved in the development of off-flavor are more varied in the pea. The pea off-flavor may thus be more complicated to control.
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research

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ConclusionAlthough the clinical benefit of omalizumab in asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) has been established in several clinical trials, there are very little data about its effect on severe VKC. In addition to few previously reported cases we can report the rapid effectiveness of omalizumab in VKC clinically and in terms of quality of life. Randomized trials are needed to include omalizumab in third-line treatment of VKC for prevention of visual impairment and further sequelae such as corneal damage.
Source: Allergo Journal International - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Authors: Chang C, Wu H, Lu Q Abstract Food allergy is a global health problem, particularly in developed countries. It is mainly mediated by Th2 cell and IgE produced by B cells. While the pathogenesis of IgE-mediated food allergy is quite straightforward, the factors that lead to the development of food allergies at any age in children and adults are unclear. Recent studies have revealed that genetics, epigenetics, and environmental exposures contribute to the development of atopy. In this chapter, we discuss the interplay between these three key elements, reveal how epigenetic modifications may mediate genetic su...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Conditions:   Allergy;Food;   Adherence, Treatment;   Child, Only Interventions:   Behavioral: Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program;   Other: Food Allergy Knowledge Intervention Sponsors:   Kent State University;   Rhode Island Hospital;   University of Memphis Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
POLLEN COUNT has been forecasted for the UK today by the Met Office. What is the pollen count for today and how can you keep your allergy symptoms at bay while having pets?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Peanut allergy (PA) is associated with an economic and psychologic burden on patients and families. Its diagnosis includes tests for peanut specific IgE (sIgE), the values of which usually are categorized as positive or negative using a predefined cutoff (usually 0.35kU/L). With the use of Bayes theorem, this categorization can be replaced with a continuous interpretation if sIgE which accounts for the prevalence of PA and history of ingestion.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Metabolomic signatures may be helpful to identify biomarkers for food allergy that are both specific and robust [1, 2]. In children, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed increased levels of uric acid in serum of children with peanut allergy [3] and elevated lactate, creatinine and glutamine levels and lower lipid and nicotinic acid levels have been observed in young adults with peanut allergy [4]. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics allows simultaneous quantification of a large number of metabolites that are involved in different pathways [5, 6].
Source: Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionIgE-sensitization to airborne allergens increases with age up to young adulthood, whereas sensitization to food allergens seems to level off. Male sex is strongly associated with IgE-sensitization to airborne allergens from early childhood up to young adulthood. In contrast, there is little evidence for associations between sex and IgE-sensitization to foods.
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
We thank Grigoletto et al for their thoughtful letter regarding our report.1 We agree with the authors ’ conclusion that clinicians should consider history of asthma and asthma control status when managing children with anaphylaxis. In support of their conclusions, the authors cite a study evaluating anaphylactic reactions from peanuts and tree nuts in an outpatient allergy center.2 In contrast to our report, this study includes limited allergens, and may represent a more severe cohort of patients with a higher predilection for asthma and/or severe anaphylaxis based on their referral to an allergy center.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
PMID: 32443118 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Am J Nurs Source Type: research
Conditions:   Allergy;Food;   Adherence, Treatment;   Child, Only Interventions:   Behavioral: Food Allergy Superheroes Training (FAST) Program;   Other: Food Allergy Knowledge Intervention Sponsors:   Kent State University;   Rhode Island Hospital;   University of Memphis Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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