How to Deal with Boredom

Many people struggle with chronic boredom. But what exactly is boredom and what are some ways to move beyond it? According to Wikipedia, “Boredom is an emotional and occasionally psychological state experienced when an individual is left without anything in particular to do, is not interested in their surroundings, or feels that a day or period is dull or tedious.” We all know the feeling. It is part of life. But sometimes it’s a symptom of something deeper that needs tending. In my psychotherapy practice, I see a few main causes for chronic states of boredom:  Boredom which functions as a protective defense against emotional pain. Traumatic and adverse experiences during childhood, like being raised in a chaotic household, make a child feel unsafe. The lack of safety triggers overwhelming and conflicting emotions, like rage and fear. To cope alone, a child’s mind compartmentalizes away “bad” feelings to carry on with life. But disconnecting from emotions, as much as it spares us pain, can also manifest as boredom. Boredom in this case is a byproduct of being out of touch with core emotions like sadness, anger, fear, disgust, joy, excitement, and sexual excitement. When we lose access to our core emotions, we cut off a vital source of energy that makes us feel alive. To heal, we must re-connect safely with our vast emotional world through the body. Boredom which functions as a signal that we are under-stimulated. In thi...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Boredom Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSION: Patients' qualitative feedback highlighted the potential feasibility and adaptability of the program for this population. The results of this preliminary study show promising avenues for research in the field of cancer patients' adaptive coping enhancement as well as reduce anxiety and depression symptoms. This type of workshop can be considered as complementary to individual psychotherapies as they may tap into different mechanisms that help foster psychological flexibility as the group format enhances decentering processes. Further research avenues are proposed in order to assess the efficacy of such interven...
Source: L Encephale - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Encephale Source Type: research
Once you begin to dip your toes into psychological therapies, it doesn’t take long before you begin to see TLAs all over the place. So today I’m going to post on two things: some of the TLAs, and why or how we might consider using these approaches in pain rehabilitation. The first one is CBT, or cognitive behavioural therapy. CBT grew out of two movements: behaviour therapy (Skinner and the pigeons, rats and all that behaviour modification stuff), and cognitive therapy (Ellis and Beck and the “cognitive triad” – more on this later). When the two approaches to therapy are combined, we have c...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Clinical reasoning Cognitive behavioral therapy Coping strategies Interdisciplinary teams Occupational therapy Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs
On today’s show, Gabe talks with Dr. Jessi Gold, a self-described misinformation crusader.  In addition to being a practicing psychiatrist, Dr. Gold’s career has focused on writing about mental health and mental illness for a lay audience. Join us as Gabe and Dr. Jessi talk about common sources of psychiatric misinformation, the perils of the supplement industry, how mental health and mental illness are often portrayed incorrectly in the popular media, and why she decided to pursue a very specific type of writing career. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW Guest information for ‘Dr. Jessi’ Podcast Episode...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Health-related Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Psychiatry Psychology The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
In this episode, Gabe talks with PsychCentral.com editor-in-chief Dr. John Grohol about the importance of planning for the end of life.  We all know that everybody dies, but at the same time, no one wants to think about their own inevitable death. Do you know how you would like the end of your life to go?  What if you needed to make that decision for a loved one? Do you know what they want? Would they want to be resuscitated? Do they want to die at home or in a hospital? Do you even know what kinds of decisions need to be made, or what the options are?  Listen in as Dr. John explains that there is a degre...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Death & Dying General LifeHelper The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
You’re intensely insecure and self-conscious, so much so it feels like one of your prime attributes. You’d describe yourself as a true-blue pessimist or cynic. You don’t really get excited about anything. You have a hard time connecting with others. And you find yourself constantly exhausted and drained. Because it’s been this way for so long—decades maybe, you’ve lost count—you just assume it’s you. You assume this is who and how you are. This must be your personality. This is just your way of life. However, these supposed traits and tendencies might actually be a diagnosabl...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Personality Psychotherapy Self-Help Treatment Chronic Depression Dysthymia PDD persistent depressive disorder Source Type: news
Police officers are often the first responders when someone is having a mental illness crisis.  But are members of law enforcement properly equipped for this job?  There are plenty of horrifying stories that would indicate that the answer is “no.”  How do we change this?  Join us as Gabe speaks with Officer Rebecca Skillern from the Huston, Texas, Police Department about how Houston is training its officers to respond to these difficult calls. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Policing and Crisis Intervention Training’ Podcast Episode   Officer Rebecca S...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Policy and Advocacy Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
   Today we are joined by Dr. Russell Morfitt, co-founder of LearntoLive.com.  Dr. Morfitt explains the differences between stress, worry, anxiety, social anxiety, and panic, and tell us how using the techniques of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) can be life changing.  The Learn to Live program is designed to teach CBT skills online to anxiety sufferers, those who suffer from depression, and even insomniacs!  Listen in to learn how you can begin to free yourself from the burdens of anxiety.  SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Anxiety, Stress, and Worry’ Podcas...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
This study aims 1) to explore individual differences in women with chronic pain (CP) in regard to pain intensity, functional impairment, cognitive fusion and depressive symptoms, and 2) to longitudinally test whether cognitive fusion is a significant predictor of depression symptoms, while controlling for pain intensity and functional impairment, over a 12-month period. This study follows a longitudinal design, and was conducted in a sample of 86 women with CP who responded to an online battery of questionnaires in three equally-spaced assessment moments. In order to explore the growth trajectory of variables of interest, ...
Source: Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clin Psychol Psychother Source Type: research
We’ve come a long way since therapists prescribed to their clients to punch their pillows when angry as a cathartic way to release negative emotions. While it helped bring up the emotion, they left out a critical piece in recovery: connecting that emotion to the logical side of our brains. What the person felt was not relief but disassociation. What we know today in neuroscience and psychotherapy research is that when a traumatic event occurs, the brain goes into dysregulation. That is, the body and the mind become disconnected. Our survival or emotional part of our brain kicks in and calls the shots while our logic...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: PTSD Trauma Treatment Disassociation Emotional Dysregulation Resilience Trauma Informed care trauma recovery Validation Source Type: blogs
“Once you learn the art of relaxation, everything happens spontaneously and effortlessly.” – Amma During hectic times, it’s tough to remember that relaxation is more than a luxury. In fact, humans need to relax to maintain balance in their lives. Work stress, family strife, and mounting responsibilities can exact a tremendous toll. Relaxing should be at the top of the list as a healthy coping measure and as a rewarding self-gift. Why do we so often neglect this healing self-care? Do you know the healthiest ways to relax your mind, body and soul? Perhaps the biggest obstacle to relaxing is that some ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
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