The Impact of Obesity in Heart Failure

Obesity has reached worldwide epidemic proportions, adversely impacting health on a global scale. Overweight and obesity adversely impact cardiac structure and function, affecting systolic and diastolic ventricular function. Studies and meta-analyses have documented an obesity paradox in large heart failure cohorts, where overweight and obese individuals with established heart failure have a better short- and medium-term prognosis compared with lean patients; this relationship is strongly impacted by level of cardiorespiratory fitness. There are implications for therapies aimed at increasing lean and muscle mass, and weight loss, for the prevention and treatment of compared with in patients with concomitant obesity.
Source: Heart Failure Clinics - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research

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With advancements in technology leading to improvements in survival as well as quality of life,1,2 left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly used to support patients with end-stage heart failure as either a bridge to cardiac transplantation (BTT) or as destination therapy (DT). Concurrent with the epidemic of heart failure,3 is also the problem of obesity which is present in greater than one third of U.S. adults when defined as a body mass index [BMI]> 30 kg/m2. Obesity is a risk factor for the development of heart failure4 and many obese patients will progress to end-stage disease requiring evaluation fo...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractDiabetes mellitus (DM) is a major and worsening global health problem, currently affecting over 450 million people and reducing their quality of life. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) accounts for more than 90% of DM and the global epidemic of obesity, which largely explains the dramatic increase in the incidence and prevalence of T2DM in the past 20 years. Obesity is a major risk factor for DM which is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The electro-mechanical function of the heart is frequently compromised in diabetic patients. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of ...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Obesity is increasing in prevalence worldwide and in the general U.S. population.1 This epidemic also extends to patients with heart failure (HF),2 with obesity being a significant risk factor for the development of HF.2 –5 However, it remains uncertain to what extent obesity-related HF should be considered a clinically distinct phenotype within the broader categories of HF or whether obesity more simply reflects one of the comorbidities associated with chronic HF.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity is increasing in prevalence worldwide and in the general U.S. population.1 This epidemic also extends to patients with heart failure (HF) 2 with obesity being a significant risk factor for the development of HF.2 –5 However, it remains uncertain to what extent obesity-related HF should be considered a clinically distinct phenotype within the broader categories of HF or whether obesity more simply reflects one of the co-morbidities associated with chronic HF.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
This study aims to determine if there is an association between higher BMI and exchange-free survival at one year post LVAD implantation.
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: 461 Source Type: research
The heart health of younger Americans may be declining, even after years of medical progress. Heart disease is, and has for years been, the leading cause of death among American men and women. But for decades, medical and therapeutic advances were enough to drive down cardiovascular death rates. More recently, however, that progress has stalled and the trend has begun to reverse, with certain populations seeing rising rates of some heart issues. In a new research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, which was based on national death certificate data, researchers charted an increase in hear...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
In conclusion, the impaired in situ activity of RyR2 may also account for the poor overall cardiac outcome reported in MetS patients; hence, the SERCA pump and RyR2 are both attractive potential targets for future therapies. Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of biochemical and physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2); it represents a severe public health problem around the world (Alberti et al., 2009). Risk factors for MetS include obesity (particularly central obesity), elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Sound, rhythm, rate, structure, function – countless features of the heart are measured to keep it healthy for as long as possible. Recently, an army of digital health technologies joined the forces of traditional preventive tools in cardiology to counter stroke, heart attack, heart failure or any other cardiovascular risks. In the future, minuscule sensors, digital twins, and artificial intelligence could strengthen their ranks. Let’s see what the future of cardiology might look like! Fitness trackers, chatbots and A.I. against heart disease Let’s say 36-year-old Maria living in Sao Paulo in 2033 d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics cardiology cardiovascular cardiovascular diseases digital digital twin health trackers heart heart health heart rate heart soun Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewDiabetes mellitus (DM) has become a rising epidemic in the last century, more pressing in the last few decades with the exponential rise of obesity, and has become one of the leading causes of death worldwide.Recent FindingsGenetic variants have also been a new field of epidemiology research to determine the underlying genetic component of those risk factors and the association of DM with CVD.SummaryIn light of its significant prevalence, patients remain unaware of their disease progression that arises from genetic and metabolic risk factors. As compared to non-diabetics, those with type 2 DM carry...
Source: Current Cardiology Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Hypertension is the most prevalent non-communicable disease, estimated to affect 1.13 billion individuals nowadays. It is the leading preventable cause of mortality worldwide and a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and chronic renal diseases in developed and developing countries.1,2. Worldwide, the aging population, decreased fitness and obesity epidemic have contributed to the increased prevalence of hypertension3. Given that, it poses a significant health and economic challenge to both developed and developing countries.
Source: Atherosclerosis - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
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